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Duke Heart Pulse week ending January 23rd 2022

Highlights of the week:

Duke Health Welcomes Craig Albanese as Executive VP & COO

Please join us in welcoming Craig Albanese, MD, MBA, to Duke University Health System! In October, Duke Health named Albanese, a seasoned health care executive and distinguished academic pediatric surgeon, as our next executive vice president and chief operating officer. He succeeds William Fulkerson, MD, who held the executive vice president position since 2010. Fulkerson stepped down from the role at the end of the 2021. Albanese began his new role on Monday, Jan. 17.

As executive vice president, Albanese will serve as the senior leader overseeing the timely execution of DUHS goals and strategic priorities. He will work with other clinical enterprise leaders to deliver outstanding outcomes and care across Duke’s network, from the hospital to ambulatory clinics to care in homes and the community. He will also bring new insights to manage the organization’s COVID pandemic response, to support the health system’s faculty and staff and to further advance the clinical enterprise strategic plan.

Albanese was previously with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, where he served as senior vice president and chief medical officer of the $9.2 billion, 10-hospital academic health system.

Please click here to view a video released this week where he introduces himself to the Duke team: https://duke.is/57vus

Welcome to Duke, Dr. Albanese!

Endress Named Clinical Lead 3300 Effective Jan. 31st

We are pleased to share that Gerald Endress, a clinical nurse on 3300, has been named Clinical Lead. Endress has worked on 3300 since July 2016 when he began as a new graduate RN. Gerald graduated from Durham Tech Community College and then received his BSN from Western Governors University. Gerald holds several leadership roles here at Duke including Charge Nurse, Preceptor, Responsiveness/Purposeful Rounding Project Manager, and is a member of the DUH Pain team and 3300 Scheduling committee. Endress holds an MS in Exercise Physiology from Old Dominion University and served for many years as the Fitness Director of the former Duke Diet & Fitness Center (now the Duke Lifestyle and Weight Management Center).

Gerald and his husband, Scott, have been married for five years and live in Raleigh. He is well-known for his great sense of humor. His new role as Clinical Lead is effective January 31st.

Congratulations, Gerald!

First Subject Enrolled in PATCHWORK

Congratulations to Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology fellow Zak Loring and his research team – they have enrolled their first patient in the PATCHWORK trial. This study follows the NIH Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant on which Loring serves as PI: Non-invasive hemodynamic sensor patch for remote, early detection and prevention of heart failure with left bundle branch block. The team is targeting any patients who are referred for an echo who do not have complex congenital heart disease and are not actively being paced. If you have any questions about the study or wish to refer a patient, please contact Zak Loring, Melissa Lefevre or Danielle Wilson via email.

Cardiac MRI-DN Wins Performance Award

Congratulations to the Duke Heart Cardiac MRI-DN team – they earned the Patient Experience Monthly Performance Award for Outpatient Test & Treatment (OP T&T) Response to Concerns/Complaints Most Improved from Prior Quarter. Increased Top-Box score from July 2021 – September 2021 to October 2021 – December 2021.

Some of the comments received by the team include:

  • Staff was great
  • So sweet and great with my son. Absolutely loved them.”
  • Everyone was wonderful. We’re all very appreciative.”

Congratulations and keep up the great work!

Duke MLK Observances Continue

Thursday, Jan. 27: It Starts with Me: Shifting Priorities to Create the Beloved Community. 11-11:45 a.m. via Zoom.

Dr. King once said, “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” At Duke Health we are putting actions behind these words as we raise our voices together to create a community that is stronger, healthier and more just. While our 2022 celebrations look different from years past, here’s how you can honor Dr. King’s legacy and further his selfless dream:

  • Participate in the Jan. 27 Virtual Event. Click here to joinIt Starts with Me: Shifting Priorities to Create the Beloved Community,” from 11 – 11:45 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 27. The keynote speaker will be Damon Tweedy, MD, JD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, and author of “Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine.” View the flyer and share as appropriate. Download the Zoom background.
  • Consider volunteering. Check out opportunities available in the community via MLK service events or Activate Good.

COVID-19 Update

Consider joining the next Duke Health Leadership Town Hall tomorrow, January 24, to ask questions and hear updates on our COVID response, testing, and Omicron. The Zoom event can be accessed here.

Duke Health’s Adopt-A-Unit is a matchmaking program that enables teams to actively support units continuing to fight on the frontlines of COVID through efforts such as meals, expressions of gratitude or other well-being support. If you are a leader interested in adopting a unit, please complete this smartsheet form. Once your information is received, a program member will be in touch to connect you with a unit in need that fits your budget and timeline. If you’d like to donate to our Healthcare Worker Unit Support fund, click here for details. Questions? Contact caring@duke.edu.

Reminder: All Duke University Health System (DUHS) and Private Diagnostic Clinic (PDC) team members, regardless of work location, are required to receive and provide documentation of a completed COVID-19 booster vaccination by 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022, or within 28 days of their eligibility under CDC and state guidelines. More details are available in this email that was sent to all staff on Tuesday, Dec. 28.

All the latest Clinical Operations updates related to COVID can be found at https://covid-19.dukehealth.org.

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

Cardiology Grand Rounds

January 25: End of Life in Heart Failure with Carmelo Milano, Chet Patel and Tony Galanos. 5 p.m., Webex.

February 1: Topic TBA. Presenter will be Caitlin Drescher.

February 10: Topic TBA. Our guest will be AAMC President, Dr. David Skorton.

February 15: Topic TBA. Presenter will be Toi Spates.

 

THIS WEEK: Dzau Distinguished Lecture in Global Health

Wednesday, Jan. 26:  Restoring Global Solidarity on the Road to Pandemic Recovery — A Conversation with Dr. Agnes Binagwaho and Dr. Paul Farmer. Noon – 1:30 p.m., Zoom. Registration required: https://bit.ly/3tbw7SM.

Global health crises require global responses. But in the effort to control COVID-19, rising tides of nationalism have threatened collective action and deepened health inequities for many countries. In the face of these challenges to global health solidarity, the Duke Global Health Institute presents a probing discussion with two of the world’s preeminent global health experts – Dr. Agnes Binagwaho and Dr. Paul Farmer – on how the world failed to cooperate to fight the pandemic and how to chart a new vision to achieve health equity.

This interactive webinar will span two continents, with our featured speakers appearing at the University of Global Health Equity in Butaro, Rwanda. Dr. Gavin Yamey, professor of the practice of global health and public policy, will moderate the conversation from Duke, fielding questions from the online audience. Attendees will join using Zoom webinar, space permitting.

 

Call for Applicants: 2022 AAMC Early-Career Women Seminar

The Department of Medicine and Program for Women in Internal Medicine (PWIM) are pleased to announce sponsorship for one faculty member to attend the in-person AAMC Early-Career Women Seminar on July 19-22, 2022. This popular and highly interactive seminar provides women at the assistant professor level with foundational leadership knowledge and skills to help achieve career goals and thrive as successful leaders in academic medicine and science. If interested in being considered for sponsorship, please send an email to Kimberly Dorman (kimberly.dorman@duke.edu) by January 31, 2022. Members of the office of the Vice-Chair for Faculty Development and Diversity (Drs. Laura Svetkey and Daniella Zipkin) will select one faculty member to nominate to attend and will notify the applicant by email.

 

Duke Research Week 2022

January 31 – February 4: Registration is now open for Duke Research Week 2022. Join us virtually for a week-long celebration of research underway at Duke! There is an excellent lineup of faculty lectures, panel discussions, “flash talks” with graduate students, trainees and postdoctoral fellows, and guest presenters for the Robert J. Lefkowitz, MD, Distinguished Lecture and Daubechies Lecture. Check out the full agenda here: https://dukeresearchweek.vfairs.com/en/#distinguishedlectures

National Wear Red Day

Friday, Feb. 4: National Wear Red Day. Help increase awareness of the impact cardiovascular disease has on all of us — wear red on Friday, Feb. 4! We would love to have individual and team photos of you sporting your awareness gear to share in Pulse!!

Kisslo Spring Courses Announced

The 2022 Echo Techs Anatomic & Computer Dissections Course will be held on Saturday, Feb. 5 (Basic) and Saturday, Feb. 12 (Intermediate) for fellows, echo techs and attendings.

Registration is required. Seats fill fast and space is limited. Boxed breakfast/lunch will be provided (as allowed per Covid restrictions). If you would like more information or want to register, please email Dawne Smith. A calendar invitation to confirm registration will be sent to you or you may be added to a waitlist if the sessions are filled. First time participants are given priority. Please let her know if you have taken the course before. If you register and your plans change, please cancel as soon as possible by declining the calendar invite or contacting Dawne so that the open seat can be offered to someone on the waitlist.

The Basic Course on Feb. 5 will take place in the Duke South Amphitheater located across from the Duke South cafeteria entrance. The Intermediate Course on Feb. 12 will take place in the Main Lecture Hall in the Searle Center. Directions for access will be provided closer to the course date. Questions? Dawne can be reached at 919-668-1524 or dawne.t.smith@duke.edu.

 Newly Announced CME

April 23: Duke Sports Cardiology & Sudden Death in Athletes Symposium with course directors Jim Daubert and Bill Kraus. Virtual. For information or to register, contact Christy Darnell christy.darnell@duke.edu or 919-880-8686.

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged. Submissions by Noon, Wednesdays, to be considered for weekend inclusion. 

Duke Heart in the News:

January 17 — Manesh Patel and Marat Fudim

HCP Live

7 FDA Drug Decisions To Watch Through July 2022

https://duke.is/jk9uj

January 18 — Sana Al-Khatib

Medscape

Subclinical Atrial Disease: A Window to Prevent AF and HF?

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966784

January 19 — Duke University Health System

Kiss 95.1 FM

25 of the Best Employers to Work For in North Carolina

https://duke.is/yn9b5

January 20 — Adrian Hernandez

News & Observer

Ivermectin’s potential to treat COVID gets a serious look in Duke University study

https://duke.is/r9dxy###

Division of Cardiology Publications Indexed in PubMed January 13-19, 2022

Assimon MM, Pun PH, Wang LC, Al-Khatib SM, Brookhart MA, Weber DJ, Winkelmayer WC, Flythe JE. Analysis of Respiratory Fluoroquinolones and the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death Among Patients Receiving Hemodialysis. JAMA Cardiol 2022;7(1):75-83. PM: 34668928.

Berger JS, Kornblith LZ, Gong MN, Reynolds HR, Cushman M, Cheng Y, McVerry BJ, Kim KS, Lopes RD, Atassi B, Berry S, Bochicchio G, de Oliveira Antunes M, Farkouh ME, Greenstein Y, Hade EM, Hudock K, Hyzy R, Khatri P, Kindzelski A, Kirwan BA, Baumann Kreuzi. Effect of P2Y12 Inhibitors on Survival Free of Organ Support Among Non-Critically Ill Hospitalized Patients With COVID-19: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA 2022;327(3):227-236. PM: 35040887.

Cavender MA, Harrington RA, Stone GW, Steg PG, Gibson CM, Hamm CW, Price MJ, Lopes RD, Leonardi S, Deliargyris EN, Prats J, Mahaffey KW, White HD, Bhatt DL. Ischemic Events Occur Early in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Are Reduced With Cangrelor: Findings From CHAMPION PHOENIX. Circ Cardiovasc Interv 2022;15(1):e010390. PM: 34915723.

Doll JA, Nelson AJ, Kaltenbach LA, Wojdyla D, Waldo SW, Rao SV, Wang TY. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Operator Profiles and Associations With In-Hospital Mortality. Circ Cardiovasc Interv 2022;15(1):e010909. PM: 34847693.

Felker GM, Solomon SD, Claggett B, Diaz R, McMurray JJV, Metra M, Anand I, Crespo-Leiro MG, Dahlström U, Goncalvesova E, Howlett JG, MacDonald P, Parkhomenko A, Tomcsányi J, Abbasi SA, Heitner SB, Hucko T, Kupfer S, Malik FI, Teerlink JR. Assessment of Omecamtiv Mecarbil for the Treatment of Patients With Severe Heart Failure: A Post Hoc Analysis of Data From the GALACTIC-HF Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Cardiol 2022;7(1):26-34. PM: 34643642.

Gandhi S, Garratt KN, Li S, Wang TY, Bhatt DL, Davis LL, Zeitouni M, Kontos MC. Ten-Year Trends in Patient Characteristics, Treatments, and Outcomes in Myocardial Infarction From National Cardiovascular Data Registry Chest Pain-MI Registry. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 2022;15(1):e008112. PM: 35041478.

Haghighat L, Reinhardt SW, Saly DL, Lu D, Matsouaka RA, Wang TY, Desai NR. Comfort Measures Only in Myocardial Infarction: Prevalence of This Status, Change Over Time, and Predictors From a Nationwide Study. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 2022;15(1):e007610. PM: 35041476.

Huffman KM, Parker DC, Bhapkar M, Racette SB, Martin CK, Redman LM, Das SK, Connelly MA, Pieper CF, Orenduff M, Ross LM, Ramaker ME, Dorling JL, Rosen CJ, Shalaurova I, Otvos JD, Kraus VB, Kraus WE. Calorie restriction improves lipid-related emerging cardiometabolic risk factors in healthy adults without obesity: Distinct influences of BMI and sex from CALERIE™ a multicentre, phase 2, randomised controlled trial. EClinicalMedicine 2022;43:101261. PM: 35028547.

Li C, Qu L, Matz AJ, Murphy PA, Liu Y, Manichaikul AW, Aguiar D, Rich SS, Herrington DM, Vu D, Johnson WC, Rotter JI, Post WS, Vella AT, Rodriguez-Oquendo A, Zhou B. AtheroSpectrum Reveals Novel Macrophage Foam Cell Gene Signatures Associated With Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk. Circulation 2022;145(3):206-218. PM: 34913723.

Lima FV, Manandhar P, Wojdyla D, Wang T, Aronow HD, Kadiyala V, Weissler EH, Madan N, Gilchrist IC, Grines C, Abbott JD. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Following Diagnostic Angiography by Noninterventional Versus Interventional Cardiologists: Insights From the CathPCI Registry. Circ Cardiovasc Interv 2022;15(1):e011086. PM: 34933569.

Lopez-Sendon JL, Cyr DD, Mark DB, Bangalore S, Huang Z, White HD, Alexander KP, Li J, Nair RG, Demkow M, Peteiro J, Wander GS, Demchenko EA, Gamma R, Gadkari M, Poh KK, Nageh T, Stone PH, Keltai M, Sidhu M, Newman JD, Boden WE, Reynolds HR, Chaitman BR. Effects of initial invasive vs. initial conservative treatment strategies on recurrent and total cardiovascular events in the ISCHEMIA trial. Eur Heart J 2022;43(2):148-149. PM: 34514494.

Mann DL, Givertz MM, Vader JM, Starling RC, Shah P, McNulty SE, Anstrom KJ, Margulies KB, Kiernan MS, Mahr C, Gupta D, Redfield MM, Lala A, Lewis GD, DeVore AD, Desvigne-Nickens P, Hernandez AF, Braunwald E. Effect of Treatment With Sacubitril/Valsartan in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Cardiol 2022;7(1):17-25. PM: 34730769.

Newby LK. A new biomarker of acute coronary ischaemia: from bench to bedside? Eur Heart J 2022;43(2):164-166. PM: 34791138.

Nørgaard BL, Gaur S, Fairbairn TA, Douglas PS, Jensen JM, Patel MR, Ihdayhid AR, Ko BSH, Sellers SL, Weir-McCall J, Matsuo H, Sand NPR, Øvrehus KA, Rogers C, Mullen S, Nieman K, Parner E, Leipsic J, Abdulla J. Prognostic value of coronary computed tomography angiographic derived fractional flow reserve: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Heart 2022;108(3):194-202. PM: 34686567.

Reed SD, Yang JC, Rickert T, Johnson FR, Gonzalez JM, Mentz RJ, Krucoff MW, Vemulapalli S, Adamson PB, Gebben DJ, Rincon-Gonzalez L, Saha A, Schaber D, Stein KM, Tarver ME, Bruhn-Ding D. Quantifying Benefit-Risk Preferences for Heart Failure Devices: A Stated-Preference Study. Circ Heart Fail 2022;15(1):e008797. PM: 34937393.

Rymer JA, Li S, Pun PH, Thomas L, Wang TY. Racial Disparities in Invasive Management for Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction With Chronic Kidney Disease. Circ Cardiovasc Interv 2022;15(1):e011171. PM: 34915722.

Rymer JA, Narcisse D, Cosiano M, Tanaka J, McDermott MM, Treat-Jacobson DJ, Conte MS, Tuttle B, Patel MR, Smolderen KG. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Symptomatic, Non-Limb-Threatening Peripheral Artery Disease: A State-of-the-Art Review. Circ Cardiovasc Interv 2022;15(1):e011320. PM: 34937395.

Takagi H, Leipsic JA, McNamara N, Martin I, Fairbairn TA, Akasaka T, Nørgaard BL, Berman DS, Chinnaiyan K, Hurwitz-Koweek LM, Pontone G, Kawasaki T, Rønnow Sand NP, Jensen JM, Amano T, Poon M, Øvrehus KA, Sonck J, Rabbat MG, Mullen S, De Bruyne B, et al. Trans-lesional fractional flow reserve gradient as derived from coronary CT improves patient management: ADVANCE registry. J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr 2022;16(1):19-26. PM: 34518113.

Timmons JA, Anighoro A, Brogan RJ, Stahl J, Wahlestedt C, Farquhar DG, Taylor-King J, Volmar CH, Kraus WE, Phillips SM. A human-based multi-gene signature enables quantitative drug repurposing for metabolic disease. Elife 2022;11:10.7554/eLife.68832. PM: 35037854.

Vora AN, Swaminathan RV. Posting Another Win for Intravascular Imaging: Moving Away From Angiography-Only Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Toward a More Comprehensive Approach. Circ Cardiovasc Interv 2022;15(1):e011670. PM: 35041451.

Wang H, Noordam R, Cade BE, Schwander K, Winkler TW, Lee J, Sung YJ, Bentley AR, Manning AK, Aschard H, Kilpeläinen TO, Ilkov M, Brown MR, Horimoto AR, Richard M, Bartz TM, Vojinovic D, Lim E, Nierenberg JL, Liu Y, Chitrala K, Rankinen T, Musani SK, et al. Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-sleep interactions identify novel loci for blood pressure. Mol Psychiatry 2021;26(11):6293-6304. PM: 33859359.

Yancy CW, Hernandez AF, Fonarow GC. Identifying Treatments for Stage C2 Heart Failure. JAMA Cardiol 2022;7(1):34-35. PM: 34643645.

Duke Heart Pulse – Week Ending January 16th 2022

Chief’s message:

Hopefully you all will get a moment this weekend to enjoy the North Carolina “Snow.” As we reflect on MLK day, we remember the non-violent protests and consistent work of Dr. King to advocate and fight for justice and civil rights for all.  I am including some of his words below to consider in our upcoming days of action and service.

“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in healthcare is the most shocking and inhumane.”

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?”

“The time is always right to do what is right.”

Rounding this last week in the CICU, I was again reminded by the tremendous dedication of our fellows, residents, nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, APPs, faculty, and countless other staff that are continually working as teams to help care for our patients and each other.  Thank you all for the unwavering dedication, professionalism, and clinical expertise.

Highlights of the week:

Rymer, Greene Selected for 2022 LEADER Program

Jennifer Rymer

Duke Heart faculty members Jennifer Rymer and Stephen Greene are among 36 Duke

Stephen Greene

physician scientists selected to the 2022 cohort for Duke’s course on Leadership Development for Researchers (LEADER). The faculty development program is an interactive 5-month series designed for junior faculty who are leading research teams. The leadership course is designed to help build critical skills for leading teams, such as conflict management, effective mentorship, negotiation skills, leading with emotional intelligence and balancing competing priorities.

Congratulations, Jenn and Steve!

 

 

7E Earns Beacon Award for Excellence

We are excited to share that our Duke Heart Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (ICU) has received a Beacon Award for Excellence from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)!

This national award recognizes caregivers in units whose consistent and systematic approach to evidence-based care optimizes patient outcomes. Units that receive this national recognition serve as role models to others across the country on their journey to excellent patient and family care. The application reviewers noted the unit’s strong sense of collaboration amongst teams to drive patient outcomes and improve quality of care.

Beacon Awards are national awards recognizing nursing excellence and speak to the caliber of nursing provided on the unit. A team must apply for consideration and must meet clearly defined criteria across five categories: leadership structures and systems; appropriate staffing and staff engagement; effective communication, knowledge management and learning development; evidence-based practice and processes; and outcome measurements.

Only 20 Cardiac ICUs in the U.S. currently hold this designation. We are incredibly proud of 7 East!

Congratulations and way to go, team!!!

 

Kudos to Eleazu!

Kristin Newby shared a terrific note with us that she received this week about cardiology fellow Ijeoma Eleazu:

Hi Dr. Newby,

I wanted to write a quick message singling out Dr. Eleazu for special praise. Our team had a difficult night last night, not only because of challenges in patient care, but also with the additional stress on everyone, largely because of Covid. Despite the multiple codes and many other challenges, Dr. Eleazu was a true leader, providing a steady and reassuring hand throughout. She demonstrated unflappability despite the increased stress and difficulties in patient care. For the housestaff, she was a tremendous advocate, stepping up when we needed input or a voice of support. Throughout it all, she continue to teach, challenging us to rise the occasion by allowing us to formulate our own plans rather than dictating.

I am thankful for her leadership and exemplary performance and wanted to make sure it was recognized.

Best regards, Hubie Haywood

Great work, Ijeoma!

Kudos to Whitney Bakimli!

One of our excellent Cardiothoracic Surgery Step-down Unit nurses, Whitney Bakimli, has received a Great Catch from Duke University Hospital leadership!

Whitney noticed two identical orders for Lasix for a patient. While the total dose was not unusual, she was concerned that it might be too high for this particular patient. Whitney contacted the provider and learned that the order was mistakenly duplicated.

Great job, Whitney!

MLK Commemoration 2022

This year’s Martin Luther King, Jr. keynote address will take place at 3 p.m. today (Sunday, Jan. 16). How Long Must We Wait: Striving For the Beloved Community will be given by historian and social activist, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. The event, originally planned to occur in Duke Chapel, has been moved to a virtual event that will be live streamed due to the pending winter storm. There are several community service opportunities scheduled this week in honor of MLK Day. We encourage you to check them out. Information about both the keynote address and service opportunities are available on the Duke MLK Commemoration website (https://mlk.duke.edu).

 

COVID-19 Update

As of Friday, Jan. 14, Duke Health has moved from Tier 2 (Limited Access) to Tier 3 (Restricted Access) of our visitation guidelines. The transition was made based on recommendations from the CDC and our infectious disease experts due to the increased COVID infection rates in our community and among team members.

Documentation regarding visitation restrictions as well as the latest Clinical Operations updates regarding COVID-19 and links to the most recent DUHS Leadership Virtual Town Hall recordings can be found here: https://covid-19.dukehealth.org.

Reminder: All Duke University Health System (DUHS) and Private Diagnostic Clinic (PDC) team members, regardless of work location, are required to receive and provide documentation of a completed COVID-19 booster vaccination by 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022, or within 28 days of their eligibility under CDC and state guidelines. More details are available in this email that was sent to all staff on Tuesday, Dec. 28.

Critical Need for Blood Donations

On Tuesday, the American Red Cross announced a national blood crisis – the worst shortage in more than 10 years. If you’d like to donate, there are several upcoming blood drives scheduled to take place in The Great Hall at Trent Semans Center:

  • Thursday, Jan. 20 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Feb. 1 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Feb. 15 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m

The best way to locate a drive in your area and to schedule a donation is by visiting: https://www.redcrossblood.org/.

ICYMI: Durham County Offering Boosters to Ages 12-15, Third Doses to Ages 5-11; Pfizer Booster Waiting Period Reduced to Five Months

As of Monday, January 10, the Durham County Department of Public Health expanded COVID-19 vaccination eligibility at its vaccination clinic. They will offer booster doses of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines for all people ages 12-15, and third doses of Pfizer vaccines for children ages 5-11 who are moderately to severely immunocompromised. Additionally, booster vaccinations will now be available for all people 12 and older five months after they complete a primary Pfizer vaccination series, reducing the waiting period from its previous length of six months. To learn more, visit: https://bit.ly/3qsa4Fm.

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

Cardiology Grand Rounds

January 18: The Ultimate ‘Anti-Racism Statement’ Medicine Can Make is to Diversify its Ranks with Quinn Capers, IV of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. 5 p.m. via Webex.

January 20: Road to Heart Transplantation: Challenges, Opportunities, New Frontiers with Mary Keebler, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. 5 p.m., Webex.

January 25: Palliative Care Grand Rounds with Carmelo Milano, Chet Patel and Tony Galanos. Time and location TBA.

February 1: Topic TBA. Presenter will be Caitlin Drescher.

February 10: Topic TBA. Our guest will be AAMC President, Dr. David Skorton.

February 15: Topic TBA. Presenter will be Toi Spates.

Dzau Distinguished Lecture in Global Health

Wednesday, Jan. 26:  Restoring Global Solidarity on the Road to Pandemic Recovery — A Conversation with Dr. Agnes Binagwaho and Dr. Paul Farmer. Noon – 1:30 p.m., Zoom. Registration required: https://bit.ly/3tbw7SM.

Global health crises require global responses. But in the effort to control COVID-19, rising tides of nationalism have threatened collective action and deepened health inequities for many countries. In the face of these challenges to global health solidarity, the Duke Global Health Institute presents a probing discussion with two of the world’s preeminent global health experts – Dr. Agnes Binagwaho and Dr. Paul Farmer – on how the world failed to cooperate to fight the pandemic and how to chart a new vision to achieve health equity.

This interactive webinar will span two continents, with our featured speakers appearing at the University of Global Health Equity in Butaro, Rwanda. Dr. Gavin Yamey, professor of the practice of global health and public policy, will moderate the conversation from Duke, fielding questions from the online audience. Attendees will join using Zoom webinar, space permitting.

 

Call for Applicants: 2022 AAMC Early-Career Women Seminar

The Department of Medicine and Program for Women in Internal Medicine (PWIM) are pleased to announce sponsorship for one faculty member to attend the in-person AAMC Early-Career Women Seminar on July 19-22, 2022. This popular and highly interactive seminar provides women at the assistant professor level with foundational leadership knowledge and skills to help achieve career goals and thrive as successful leaders in academic medicine and science. If interested in being considered for sponsorship, please send an email to Kimberly Dorman (kimberly.dorman@duke.edu) by January 31, 2022. Members of the office of the Vice-Chair for Faculty Development and Diversity (Drs. Laura Svetkey and Daniella Zipkin) will select one faculty member to nominate to attend and will notify the applicant by email.

 

Duke Research Week 2022

January 31 – February 4: Registration is now open for Duke Research Week 2022. Join us virtually for a week-long celebration of research underway at Duke! There is an excellent lineup of faculty lectures, panel discussions, “flash talks” with graduate students, trainees and postdoctoral fellows, and guest presenters for the Robert J. Lefkowitz, MD, Distinguished Lecture and Daubechies Lecture. Check out the full agenda here: https://dukeresearchweek.vfairs.com/en/#distinguishedlectures

National Wear Red Day

Friday, Feb. 4: National Wear Red Day. Help increase awareness of the impact cardiovascular disease has on all of us — wear red on Friday, Feb. 4! We would love to have individual and team photos of you sporting your awareness gear to share in Pulse!!

Kisslo Spring Courses Announced

The 2022 Echo Techs Anatomic & Computer Dissections Course will be held on Saturday, Feb. 5 (Basic) and Saturday, Feb. 12 (Intermediate) for fellows, echo techs and attendings.

Registration is required. Seats fill fast and space is limited. Boxed breakfast/lunch will be provided (as allowed per Covid restrictions). If you would like more information or want to register, please email Dawne Smith. A calendar invitation to confirm registration will be sent to you or you may be added to a waitlist if the sessions are filled. First time participants are given priority. Please let her know if you have taken the course before. If you register and your plans change, please cancel as soon as possible by declining the calendar invite or contacting Dawne so that the open seat can be offered to someone on the waitlist.

The Basic Course on Feb. 5 will take place in the Duke South Amphitheater located across from the Duke South cafeteria entrance. The Intermediate Course on Feb. 12 will take place in the Main Lecture Hall in the Searle Center. Directions for access will be provided closer to the course date. Questions? Dawne can be reached at 919-668-1524 or dawne.t.smith@duke.edu.

 

Newly Announced CME

April 23: Duke Sports Cardiology & Sudden Death in Athletes Symposium with course directors Jim Daubert and Bill Kraus. Virtual. For information or to register, contact Christy Darnell christy.darnell@duke.edu or 919-880-8686.

 

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged. Submissions by Noon, Wednesdays, to be considered for weekend inclusion.

Duke Heart in the News:

January 7 — Robert McGarrah

The Washington Post

Lipoprotein(a) is a type of ‘bad’ cholesterol you’ve probably never heard of. Some doctors are out to change that.

https://duke.is/gmcqy

January 8 — Duke University Hospital (Carmat)

Healio/Cardiology

Most read in HF of 2021: Empagliflozin for HFpEF, COVID-19-related myocarditis and more

https://duke.is/gmcqy

January 12 — Maitreya Thakkar

Healio/Cardiology

New perspectives on CV risk assessment of prospective kidney recipients, donors

https://duke.is/6738f

Division of Cardiology Publications Indexed in PubMed January 6-12, 2022

Bishawi M, Milano C, Gaca J, Carr K, Wang A, Glower DD. The outcome of mitral repair for degenerative versus ischemic mitral regurgitation using a single complete ring. J Card Surg 2022;37(2):290-296. PM: 34665478.

Califf RM, Wong C, Doraiswamy PM, Hong DS, Miller DP, Mega JL. Biological and clinical correlates of the patient health questionnaire-9: exploratory cross-sectional analyses of the baseline health study. BMJ Open 2022;12(1):e054741. PM: 34983769.

Devore AD, Schlendorf KH. HCV Positive Allograft Use in Heart Transplant: A Silver Lining to an Epidemic. J Card Fail 2022;28(1):42-43. PM: 34628017.

Fox KAA, Virdone S, Bassand JP, Camm AJ, Goto S, Goldhaber SZ, Haas S, Kayani G, Koretsune Y, Misselwitz F, Oh S, Piccini JP, Parkhomenko A, Sawhney JPS, Stepinska J, Turpie AGG, Verheugt FWA, Kakkar AK. Do baseline characteristics and treatments account for geographical disparities in the outcomes of patients with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation? The prospective GARFIELD-AF registry. BMJ Open 2022;12(1):e049933.  PM: 34996784.

Friedman DJ, Overmann JA, Fish JM, Gaeta SA, Tranter JH, Thao R, Piccini JP. Continuous and discontinuous radiofrequency energy delivery on the atrial free wall: Lesion transmurality, width, and biophysical characteristics. Heart Rhythm O2 2021;2(6Part A):635-641. PM: 34988509.

Lala A, Mentz RJ. The JCF Reviewer Mentorship Program. J Card Fail 2022;28(1):1-2. PM: 35000756.

Lam KY, Reardon MJ, Yakubov SJ, Modine T, Fremes S, Tonino PAL, Tan ME, Gleason TG, Harrison JK, Hughes GC, Oh JK, Head SJ, Huang J, Deeb GM. Surgical Sutureless and Sutured Aortic Valve Replacement in Low-risk Patients. Ann Thorac Surg 2022;113(2):616-622. PM: 33794164.

Oshunbade AA, Lirette ST, Windham BG, Shafi T, Hamid A, Gbadamosi SO, Tin A, Yimer WK, Tibuakuu M, Clark D, Kamimura D, Lutz EA, Mentz RJ, Fox ER, Butler J, Butler KR, Garovic VD, Turner ST, Mosley TH, Hall ME. Hypertensive Diseases in Pregnancy and Kidney Function Later in Life: The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) Study. Mayo Clin Proc 2022;97(1):78-87. PM: 34565606.

Packer DL, Mark DB, Lee KL. CABANA: underpowered and with detrimental protocol changes: is ‘ablation salvation’?-Reply by the authors of the CABANA trial. Europace 2022;24(1):3. PM: 34792125.

Patel MR, Jeremias A, Maehara A, Matsumura M, Zhang Z, Schneider J, Tang K, Talwar S, Marques K, Shammas NW, Gruberg L, Seto A, Samady H, Sharp ASP, Ali ZA, Mintz G, Davies J, Stone GW. 1-Year Outcomes of Blinded Physiological Assessment of Residual Ischemia After Successful PCI: DEFINE PCI Trial. JACC Cardiovasc Interv 2022;15(1):52-61. PM: 34991824.

Rao VN, Obeid MJ, Rigiroli F, Russell SD, Patel CB, Molinger J, Gupta RT, Agarwal R, Fudim M. Pericardial Adipose Tissue Volume and Left Ventricular Assist Device-Associated Outcomes. J Card Fail 2022;28(1):149-153. PM: 34274515.

Rasmussen PV, Pallisgaard JL, Hansen ML, Gislason GH, Torp-Pedersen C, Ruwald M, Alexander KP, Lopes RD, Al-Khatib SM, Dalgaard F. Treatment of older patients with atrial fibrillation by morbidity burden. Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes 2022;8(1):23-30. PM: 32857834.

Rimbach R, Yamada Y, Sagayama H, Ainslie PN, Anderson LF, Anderson LJ, Arab L, Baddou I, Bedu-Addo K, Blaak EE, Blanc S, Bonomi AG, Bouten CVC, Bovet P, Buchowski MS, Butte NF, Camps SGJA, Close GL, Cooper JA, Das SK, Dugas LR, Ekelund U, Entringer S. Total energy expenditure is repeatable in adults but not associated with short-term changes in body composition. Nat Commun 2022;13(1):99. PM: 35013190.

Sharma A, Zheng Y, Ezekowitz JA, Westerhout CM, Udell JA, Goodman SG, Armstrong PW, Buse JB, Green JB, Josse RG, Kaufman KD, McGuire DK, Ambrosio G, Chuang LM, Lopes RD, Peterson ED, Holman RR. Cluster Analysis of Cardiovascular Phenotypes in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Established Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: A Potential Approach to Precision Medicine. Diabetes Care 2022;45(1):204-212. PM: 34716214.

Steinberg BA, Zhang M, Bensch J, Lyons A, Bunch TJ, Piccini JP, Siu A, Spertus JA, Stehlik J, Wohlfahrt P, Greene T, Hess R, Fang JC. Quantifying the Impact of Atrial Fibrillation on Heart Failure-Related Patient-Reported Outcomes in the Utah mEVAL Program. J Card Fail 2022;28(1):13-20. PM: 34324927.

Tamirisa KP, Al-Khatib SM, Mohanty S, Han JK, Natale A, Gupta D, Russo AM, Al-Ahmad A, Gillis AM, Thomas KL. Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Management of Atrial Fibrillation. CJC Open 2021;3(12 Suppl):S137-S148. PM: 34993443.

Tanawuttiwat T, Stebbins A, Marquis-Gravel G, Vemulapalli S, Kosinski AS, Cheng A. Use of Direct Oral Anticoagulant and Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Insights From the STS/ACC TVT Registry. J Am Heart Assoc 2022;11(1):e023561. PM: 34970918.

Tcheng JE, Nguyen MV, Brann HW, Clarke PA, Pfeiffer M, Pleasants JR, Shelton GW, Kelly JF. The Medical Device Unique Device Identifier as the Single Source of Truth in Healthcare Enterprises – Roadmap for Implementation of the Clinically Integrated Supply Chain. Med Devices (Auckl) 2021;14:459-467. PM: 34992475.

Wang P, Castellani CA, Yao J, Huan T, Bielak LF, Zhao W, Haessler J, Joehanes R, Sun X, Guo X, Longchamps RJ, Manson JE, Grove ML, Bressler J, Taylor KD, Lappalainen T, Kasela S, Van Den Berg DJ, Hou L, Reiner A, Liu Y, Boerwinkle E, Smith JA, Peyser PA. Epigenome-wide association study of mitochondrial genome copy number. Hum Mol Genet 2021;31(2):309-319. PM: 34415308.

Warraich HJ, Kitzman DW, Nelson MB, Mentz RJ, Rosenberg PB, Lev Y, Whellan DJ. Older Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Who Live Alone: An Analysis From the REHAB-HF Trial. J Card Fail 2022;28(1):161-163. PM: 34147611.

 

Duke Heart Pulse week ending January 9th 2022

Chief’s message:

Hope you all had some time with family and had a happy new year.  We know the upcoming weeks and months will be challenging to all of us, including many of our colleagues, staff, faculty and fellows in healthcare.  We appreciate the continued diligence across the Heart Center in helping care for our patients and each other.

Highlights of the week:

Kudos Across Duke Heart & to Center of Excellence Staff!

The latest surge in COVID-19 infections has posed great challenges across all areas of Duke Heart and we recognize how stressful this has been to each member of our team and to our colleagues across the Health System. We appreciate the flexibility our entire team is showing and your willingness to support one another. THANK YOU for all that you’re doing.

The Duke Heart Leadership team has check-ins throughout the day to monitor and assess needs during this rapidly changing situation. If you are in need of resources, supplies or other support please do not hesitate to reach out to us. We will do everything we can to get you what you need as soon as possible.

The leadership team for Duke Heart is deeply grateful for all efforts across the Heart Center as we respond to the current surge in infections and the impact that is having on staffing levels. We especially want to thank Joe Kelly, Melissa Williams and the full Center of Excellence team for stepping up, saying ‘yes’, and mobilizing their team to help.

After a big increase in the number of Duke Health employees who have been out sick with COVID, nurses across the health system — including a number of nurses from the Duke Heart Center of Excellence — who do not work directly in patient care settings are assisting with efforts to return employees to work. They have been making calls to employees and screening them for suitability to return to work. They are collaborating closely with the Employee Occupational Health and Wellness (EOHW) team to apply the latest recommendations on reducing the risk of infectious spread in the workplace. Employees with active symptoms which are not improving are being re-assigned to an EOHW case manager.

Again, thank you for all that you’re doing. We will continue to support one another and our patients and we will get through this, together. Keep up the outstanding work!

Heart Transplants Hit 116 for Year; Further Reduction in Wait Times Noted

Our Duke Heart Transplant team completed a remarkable 116 heart transplants in 2021 and the latest Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) report — released on Thursday, January 6 — shows excellent outcomes as well as a reduction in our median wait times.

“We continue to have year over year growth and this past year was our highest ever at 116 total heart transplants,” says Adam DeVore, medical director, Duke Heart Transplantation Program. “Our wait times have been the lowest in the southeast for a while and a lot of that is due to the DCD program and changes around that. We have also seen an increase in referrals from other transplant centers throughout the region, which we attribute to our ability to get patients transplanted faster as well as good outcomes.”

Based on data reported to SRTR from October 2018 through December 31, 2021, Duke’s median wait time has decreased by 57 percent.

“Our highest ever volume, with continued excellent results, reflects the amazing work by the entire team, says Jacob Schroder, MD, surgical director, Duke Heart Transplantation Program and Co-Director, Cardiothoracic Surgical Intensive Care Unit. “We continue to be leaders, and innovators, in advanced heart failure therapies, not only in the U.S. but the world. 116 is just the beginning.”

DeVore says it’s important to recognize that these results are not just the result of the transplant program, but the efforts of all members across Duke Heart Center.

“The transplant program itself is a huge team made up of people from surgery, anesthesia and cardiology and the latest data demonstrates the hard work of our team across those areas,” DeVore added. “However, this is also very much a celebration of the Heart Center. These patients go to the Echo lab, they get MRIs, they go to the Catheterization lab, they sometimes come into the Health System because they need an EP procedure… and then maybe at some point they need a transplant. So, not only is this great news for the heart transplant program, but it’s a reflection of the work done across Duke Heart.”

We could not have said it better. Impressive work, across the board. Congratulations, team!

Bryner Named Assistant Program Director, CT Surgery Residency Program

We are pleased to share that Ben Bryner has been named the new assistant program director of our Cardiothoracic Surgery Residency Program.

In a note to the cardiothoracic faculty in December, Dr. Edward P. Chen, chief of the division, commented: “During his time on faculty, Dr. Bryner has proven to be a tireless educator committed to providing our resident learners with a rich and comprehensive training experience. We look forward to his leadership in our training program as well as his development of creative and innovative methods to further advance and improve upon our education mission. Dr. Bryner will continue the tradition of excellence in this role established by his predecessor, Dr. Brittany Zwischenberger. I would also like to express my sincere gratitude to Dr. Zwischenberger for her devoted service to our residency program over the last several years.”

Congrats, Ben!

Gutierrez Selected for ACC Emerging Faculty Leadership Academy

Dr Tony Gutierrez 06.19.2018
Duke Heart

Congratulations to Tony Gutierrez! He was recently notified of his selection from a competitive group of candidates to participate

in the 2022 American College of Cardiology’s Rick Nishimura, MD, MACC and Patrick T. O’Gara, MD, MACC Emerging Faculty Leadership Academy. The leadership course will be held May 1-3 at Heart House in Washington, DC.

Well deserved!

Snider Named President-Elect of AmSECT

Duke Heart perfusionist William Scott Snider has been named President-Elect of the American Society of Extracorporeal Technology (AmSECT) Board of Directors. The term begins in April. Snider currently serves on the Board as Treasurer. He also chairs AmSECT’s Perfusion Without Borders subcommittee.

We asked him recently about his experiences with AmSECT and his commitment to volunteering:

“Like a lot of society volunteers, I became a member of AmSECT as a student and watched from a distance for a long time — not really understanding all that a professional society can mean or the long history behind it and the many volunteers who spend hours upon hours of time in the pursuit of professional excellence within our profession,” Snider says. “As I have become more involved over the years, I have gained a better appreciation for all of these things and am very grateful for all that has been done to grow our field and keep it strong. I volunteer because it’s very exciting to me to be a small part of that big vision.

“My path in AmSECT and my career at Duke began at almost the same time, and each have rewarded me in very similar ways. Each day I’m humbled by the quality of character of each of the nurses, doctors and allied health professionals that I work with. The vision statement of Duke, ‘to educate and discover,’ is very similar to the mission statement of AmSECT. For more than 50 years, they have been driven by a goal to support our workforce as they support their patients. It’s a vision that’s shared by everyone who dedicates their life to healthcare. What makes it so gratifying is doing it together, as a team. If there was one thing that I could share about why I value both AmSECT and Duke, it would be because of the truly remarkable, conscientious, professional, motivated people that I’ve met along the way. They continue to inspire me, and I’m so fortunate to be a part of it all.”

Congratulations, Scott!

Kisslo Spring Courses Announced

The 2022 spring session dates of the echocardiography course led by Joe Kisslo have been released. The Echo Techs Anatomic & Computer Dissections Course will be held on Saturday, Feb. 5 (Basic) and Saturday, Feb. 12 (Intermediate) for fellows, echo techs and attendings.

Registration is required. Seats fill fast and space is limited. Boxed breakfast/lunch will be provided (as allowed per Covid restrictions). If you would like more information or want to register, please email Dawne Smith. A calendar invitation to confirm registration will be sent to you or you may be added to a waitlist if the sessions are filled. First time participants are given priority. Please let her know if you have taken the course before. If you register and your plans change, please cancel as soon as possible by declining the calendar invite or contacting Dawne so that the open seat can be offered to someone on the waitlist.

The Basic Course on Feb. 5 will take place in the Duke South Amphitheater located across from the Duke South cafeteria entrance. The Intermediate Course on Feb. 12 will take place in the Main Lecture Hall in the Searle Center. Directions for access will be provided closer to the course date. Questions? Dawne can be reached at 919-668-1524 or dawne.t.smith@duke.edu.

Coston & Team Place in Top 4, NurseHack4Health

Congratulations to Kimberly Coston, one of our amazing nurses on 3300, and to her ‘Knightingale‘ team members for placing among the top four teams in the November NurseHack4Health hackathon sponsored by Johnson & Johnson. Coston collaborated with the other healthcare professionals on her team (located throughout the world) and worked on a project to combat nursing burnout.

Team Knightingale

Project title: Solving for nurse burnout, which has been exacerbated by COVID-19, with cloud-based software for hospitals and facilities to assess, reaffirm and reset nurses’ mental health.

Track: Diversity in Practice and Care

Team Members: Ryan Etzel, Layne Price, Sharonda Davis, Pak Chau, Rachel Harper, Kimberly Coston, Rob McKenna and Rashna Batliwala

“We are so proud to have Kimberly on our 3300 team!” says Courtney Stierwalt, clinical lead RN for 3300.

Designed to give nurses the unique opportunity to create solutions for challenges that directly impact them and their profession, the weekend-long virtual hackathon was themed “building a sustainable nursing workforce of the future” and was a direct response to the urgent need to recruit and retain a diverse nursing workforce as a nursing shortage accelerates around the country. Nursing turnover is reaching nearly 20 percent per year, leading to a risk of decreased stability and quality in patient care and increasing health system costs.

Over the course of 48 hours, a diverse audience of innovators, including registered nurses, physicians, academics, nursing students, developers and design experts from 38 states and over 40 countries came together to focus on developing solutions for long-standing foundational challenges in the nursing workforce.

Nicely done, Kimberly!

Kudos to all Cardiology Fellows!

We were sent a wonderful note by Anna Lisa Chamis ahead of the holidays – it was sent to the entire team of cardiology fellows from Jacob Schroder.

“I just wanted to write you all a note expressing my gratitude for the amazing job you guys do on a daily basis.

Year in, year out, the CV fellow group is hands down the best in the hospital. For most other specialties, I often skip the trainees and go straight for attending-to-attending communication. Cardiology is different, though. Most of the time, I see the CV fellows as more of an ally and equal and will seek them out first. Not to mention, for our trainees, the cardiology fellows are a huge resource. I still remember being the surgical intern covering 31/3300. Dan Bensimon, a fellow at that time, was the person I called constantly for CV issues. Saved my life. And I know for my wife, Vanessa, that person was one Chet Patel (!) and she felt the same way.

Being a fellow is often a daunting and thankless job. But…

  • Keep doing what you are doing, you have a significant role in how well our patients do
  • Call any time day or night
  • Come visit any time in the OR, especially when you are bored, curious, or want to see how we deal with one of your patients!

Happy New Year!!! 2022 is going to be off the hook.” — JNS

“Thank you so much for taking the time to write this thoughtful feedback about and to the cardiology fellows. Our cardiology fellows (and faculty!) are truly lucky to learn from and collaborate with the best CT surgeons anywhere. #ilovedukeheart” — Anna Lisa

The Duke Heart team is truly special — please keep that gratitude flowing! Sharing with one another how much you appreciate and value your teammates is important, especially during these challenging times. We love sharing your uplifting notes and kudos in Pulse. Keep up the great work, everyone!

Kudos to the Duke Electrophysiology Team

We received a warm note from a grateful patient family member during the holiday season. They wrote:

“Hi Dr. Piccini, Our family is deeply grateful for your care of our beloved family member over the weekend. You inspired a great deal of confidence regarding his care plan, which greatly reduced his stress while hospitalized. Being an ever proud Frenchman, he was very pleased about your experiences with and fond feelings for France. Thanks to you and your team, he will be returning home in better condition than he left. We would like to wish you and your family un Joyeux Noel!” – grateful family member (names withheld to maintain confidentiality)

And this related note to the team from Diane Sauro, “Thank you all for the exceptional work you do every day. We appreciate all you do for your patients and the team.” — Diane

Great work, Jon and team!

Kudos to Kesler!

A grateful patient took some extra time last month to speak with James Mills and send a follow-up note about Autumn Kesler, nurse practitioner, via MyChart:

“When you hired Autumn you hit a grand slam completely out of the park! She is great!” – grateful patient

According to Cheri Wills, Health Center Administrator for Duke Cardiology of Raleigh, “Autumn has only been with our clinic since March 2021 and fit in immediately. She is wonderful in so many ways and we are fortunate to have her as part of our team.”

Way to go, Autumn!

Heart Services Holiday Open House

The Heart Services Leadership team held a holiday open house on Wednesday, Dec. 22 on the 8th floor of the HAFS building. A good time was had by all – thank you to those of you who were able to stop by and celebrate the season with us!

COVID-19 Update

You can quickly access the latest Clinical Operations updates regarding COVID-19 as well as the most recent DUHS Leadership Virtual Town Hall recordings here: https://covid-19.dukehealth.org.

Reminder: All Duke University Health System (DUHS) and Private Diagnostic Clinic (PDC) team members, regardless of work location, are required to receive and provide documentation of a completed COVID-19 booster vaccination by 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022, or within 28 days of their eligibility under CDC and state guidelines. More details are available in this email that was sent to all staff on Tuesday, Dec. 28.

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

Cardiology Grand Rounds

January 11: Telehealth to Improve Functional Status and Quality of Life in Veterans with Peripheral Artery Disease with Tony Gutierrez. 5 p.m. via Webex.

January 18: The Ultimate ‘Anti-Racism Statement’ Medicine Can Make is to Diversify its Ranks with Quinn Capers, IV of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. 5 p.m. via Webex.

 

MLK Commemoration 2022

Sunday, Jan. 16: How Long Must We Wait: Striving For the Beloved Community. The 2022 MLK keynote address will be given by historian and social activist, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor on Sunday, Jan. 16 at 3 p.m. at Duke Chapel. [UPDATE (1/14/22): This even will be virtual due to weather.] In addition, several community service opportunities are scheduled for the week of MLK Day. You can find more information about the main ceremony and service opportunities on the Duke MLK Commemoration website (https://mlk.duke.edu/). The Commemoration Service is free and open to the public. In accordance with Duke University COVID-19 mitigation policies, all guests must wear a mask at all times when indoors regardless of vaccination status. Parking will be available to all guests at the Bryan Center Garage free of charge.

 

Dzau Distinguished Lecture in Global Health

Wednesday, Jan. 26:  Restoring Global Solidarity on the Road to Pandemic Recovery — A Conversation with Dr. Agnes Binagwaho and Dr. Paul Farmer. Noon – 1:30 p.m., Zoom. Registration required: https://bit.ly/3tbw7SM.

Global health crises require global responses. But in the effort to control COVID-19, rising tides of nationalism have threatened collective action and deepened health inequities for many countries. In the face of these challenges to global health solidarity, the Duke Global Health Institute presents a probing discussion with two of the world’s preeminent global health experts – Dr. Agnes Binagwaho and Dr. Paul Farmer – on how the world failed to cooperate to fight the pandemic and how to chart a new vision to achieve health equity.

This interactive webinar will span two continents, with our featured speakers appearing at the University of Global Health Equity in Butaro, Rwanda. Dr. Gavin Yamey, professor of the practice of global health and public policy, will moderate the conversation from Duke, fielding questions from the online audience. Attendees will join using Zoom webinar, space permitting.

Duke Well-Being Ambassador Virtual Course

January 11 – March 15: The Well-being Essentials for Learning Life-Balance (WELL-B) weekly webinar series begins January 11, 2022 at 3 p.m. EST. For only one hour a week for 10 weeks (with an optional 11th week for sharing content with colleagues), healthcare workers can learn about the science and practice of well-being from Dr. Bryan Sexton, Dr. Carrie Adair, and Dr. Kyle Rehder. These strategies can enhance your well-being, and through sharing, the well-being of your co-workers. Available to all Duke Health employees and those outside of Duke as well. More information: bit.ly/dukewellb. Offered by the Duke Center for Healthcare Safety and Quality.

Call for Applicants: 2022 AAMC Early-Career Women Seminar

The Department of Medicine and Program for Women in Internal Medicine (PWIM) are pleased to announce sponsorship for one faculty member to attend the in-person AAMC Early-Career Women Seminar on July 19-22, 2022. This popular and highly interactive seminar provides women at the assistant professor level with foundational leadership knowledge and skills to help achieve career goals and thrive as successful leaders in academic medicine and science. If interested in being considered for sponsorship, please send an email to Kimberly Dorman (kimberly.dorman@duke.edu) by January 31, 2022. Members of the office of the Vice-Chair for Faculty Development and Diversity (Drs. Laura Svetkey and Daniella Zipkin) will select one faculty member to nominate to attend and will notify the applicant by email.

Duke Research Week 2022

January 31 – February 4: Registration is now open for Duke Research Week 2022. Join us virtually for a week-long celebration of research underway at Duke! There is an excellent lineup of faculty lectures, panel discussions, “flash talks” with graduate students, trainees and postdoctoral fellows, and guest presenters for the Robert J. Lefkowitz, MD, Distinguished Lecture and Daubechies Lecture. Check out the full agenda here: https://dukeresearchweek.vfairs.com/en/#distinguishedlectures

National Wear Red Day

Friday, Feb. 4: National Wear Red Day. Help increase awareness of the impact cardiovascular disease has on all of us — wear red on Friday, Feb. 4! We would love to have individual and team photos of you sporting your awareness gear to share in Pulse!!

Newly Announced CME

April 23: Duke Sports Cardiology & Sudden Death in Athletes Symposium with course directors Jim Daubert and Bill Kraus. Virtual. For information or to register, contact Christy Darnell christy.darnell@duke.edu or 919-880-8686.

Postponed: Evening with Heart Benefitting Marfan

Due to the latest COVID surge, An Evening with Heart to benefit the Marfan Foundation has been postponed to Thursday, May 5. Location remains the same: The Maxwell in Raleigh, NC. The event will include a silent auction, cocktails, heavy hors d’oeuvres and entertainment. Proceeds will benefit The Marfan Foundation. For information please visit: https://bit.ly/3cHIBYD.

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged. Submissions by Noon, Wednesdays, to be considered for weekend inclusion. 

Duke Heart in the News:

December 19 — Svati Shah

Healio/Cardiology Today

AHA to fund research on long-term impact of COVID-19 on heart, brain health

https://bit.ly/33686Sa

December 22 — Manesh Patel

Medscape

Apixaban: The ‘Anticoagulant of Choice’ for AF

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/965390#vp_1

December 22 — Manesh Patel

tctMD

Correction Issued for Controversial Study Linking COVID-19 Vaccines to ACS Risk

https://bit.ly/3F8NQfR

December 26 — Harry Severance

ACEP eNow

Top 5 Articles of 2021: How the COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines Work, and Some Current Concerns

https://bit.ly/3zNl9nK

December 27 — Jennifer Rymer

Healio/Cardiology Today

Racial gap remains in invasive management for patients with MI with chronic kidney disease

https://bit.ly/3FaYzqa

December 30 — Sana Al-Khatib

Healio/Cardiology

The Take Home: AHA Scientific Sessions

https://bit.ly/3f2P5CL

December 30 — Tristram Bahnson

Healio/Cardiology Today

Catheter ablation outcomes in patients with AF vary by age: CABANA

https://bit.ly/3F7vITG

December 31 — Jennifer Rymer and Manesh Patel

HCP Live

The Best from AHA & TCT 2021 with Jennifer Rymer, MD

https://bit.ly/3F5xS65

Division of Cardiology Publications Indexed in PubMed December 16-22, 2021

Boakye E, Kwapong YA, Obisesan O, Ogunwole SM, Hays AG, Nasir K, Blumenthal RS, Douglas PS, Blaha MJ, Hong X, Creanga AA, Wang X, Sharma G. Nativity-Related Disparities in Preeclampsia and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Among a Racially Diverse Cohort of US Women. JAMA Netw Open 2021;4(12):e2139564. PM: 34928357.

Carnicelli AP, Owen R, Pocock SJ, Brieger DB, Yasuda S, Nicolau JC, Goodman SG, Cohen MG, Simon T, Westermann D, Hedman K, Andersson Sundell K, Granger CB. Atrial fibrillation and clinical outcomes 1 to 3 years after myocardial infarction. Open Heart 2021;8(2):e001726. PM: 34911791.

Fanaroff AC, Li S, Marquis-Gravel G, Giri J, Lopes RD, Piccini JP, Wang TY. Atrial Fibrillation and Coronary Artery Disease: A Long-Term Perspective on the Need for Combined Antithrombotic Therapy. Circ Cardiovasc Interv 2021;14(12):e011232. PM: 34932388.

Franklin JM, Platt R, Dreyer NA, London AJ, Simon GE, Watanabe JH, Horberg M, Hernandez A, Califf RM. When Can Nonrandomized Studies Support Valid Inference Regarding Effectiveness or Safety of New Medical Treatments? Clin Pharmacol Ther 2022;111(1):108-115. PM: 33826756.

Friedman DJ, Emerek K, Sørensen PL, Graff C, Loring Z, Jackson KP, Polcwiartek C, Singh JP, Kisslo J, Søgaard P, Atwater BD. Relationship Between Electrical and Mechanical Dyssynchrony and Outcomes Among Patients Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy. Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol 2021;14(12):e010217. PM: 34843407.

Fudim M, Wojdyla DM, Alexander JH, Goodman SG, Mehran R, Windecker S, Aronson R, Vinereanu D, Halvorsen S, Bahit MC, Granger CB, Lopes RD. Efficacy and Safety of Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation, Recent Acute Coronary Syndrome, or Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and a History of Heart Failure: Insights From the AUGUSTUS Trial. J Am Heart Assoc 2021 Dec 21;10(24):e023143. PM: 34873913.

Fuery MA, Chouairi F, Natov P, Bhinder J, Rose Chiravuri M, Wilson L, Clark KA, Reinhardt SW, Mullan C, Miller PE, Davis RP, Rogers JG, Patel CB, Sen S, Geirsson A, Anwer M, Desai N, Ahmad T. Trends and Outcomes of Cardiac Transplantation in the Lowest Urgency Candidates. J Am Heart Assoc 2021;10(24):e023662. PM: 34743559.

Greene SJ, Butler J, Fonarow GC. Contextualizing Risk Among Patients With Heart Failure. JAMA 2021;326(22):2261-2262. PM: 34779819.

Hegde SM, Lester SJ, Solomon SD, Michels M, Elliott PM, Nagueh SF, Choudhury L, Zemanek D, Zwas DR, Jacoby D, Wang A, Ho CY, Li W, Sehnert AJ, Olivotto I, Abraham TP. Effect of Mavacamten on Echocardiographic Features in Symptomatic Patients With Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. J Am Coll Cardiol 2021;78(25):2518-2532. PM: 34915982.

Kolupoti A, Fudim M, Pandey A, Kucharska-Newton A, Hall ME, Vaduganathan M, Mentz RJ, Caughey MC. Temporal Trends and Prognosis of Physical Examination Findings in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: The ARIC Study Community Surveillance. Circ Heart Fail 2021;14(12):e008403. PM: 34702047.

Lunsford-Avery JR, Engelhard MM, Navar AM, Kollins SH. Author Correction: Validation of the Sleep Regularity Index in Older Adults and Associations with Cardiometabolic Risk. Sci Rep 2021;11(1):24398. PM: 34916542.

Lunyera J, Diamantidis CJ, Bosworth HB, Patel UD, Bain J, Muehlbauer MJ, Ilkayeva O, Nguyen M, Sharma B, Ma JZ, Shah SH, Scialla JJ. Urine tricarboxylic acid cycle signatures of early-stage diabetic kidney disease. Metabolomics 2021;18(1):5. PM: 34928443.

Marquis-Gravel G, Hammill BG, Mulder H, Roe MT, Robertson HR, Wruck LM, Sharlow A, Harris DF, Pohlman FW, Hernandez AF, Jones WS. Validation of Cardiovascular End Points Ascertainment Leveraging Multisource Electronic Health Records Harmonized Into a Common Data Model in the ADAPTABLE Randomized Clinical Trial. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 2021;14(12):e008190. PM: 34886680.

Murray EM, Whellan DJ, Chen H, Bertoni AG, Duncan P, Pastva AM, Kitzman DW, Mentz RJ. Physical Rehabilitation in Older Patients Hospitalized with Acute Heart Failure and Diabetes: Insights from REHAB-HF. Am J Med 2022;135(1):82-90. PM: 34516959.

Ross M, Henao R, Burke TW, Ko ER, McClain MT, Ginsburg GS, Woods CW, Tsalik EL. A comparison of host response strategies to distinguish bacterial and viral infection. PLoS One 2021;16(12):e0261385. PM: 34905580.

Simon GE, Bindman AB, Dreyer NA, Platt R, Watanabe JH, Horberg M, Hernandez A, Califf RM. When Can We Trust Real-World Data To Evaluate New Medical Treatments? Clin Pharmacol Ther 2022;111(1):24-29. PM: 33932030.

Simon GE, Platt R, Watanabe JH, Bindman AB, John London A, Horberg M, Hernandez A, Califf RM. When Can We Rely on Real-World Evidence to Evaluate New Medical Treatments? Clin Pharmacol Ther 2022;111(1):30-34. PM: 33895994.

Singh AK, Carroll K, McMurray JJV, Solomon S, Jha V, Johansen KL, Lopes RD, Macdougall IC, Obrador GT, Waikar SS, Wanner C, Wheeler DC, Więcek A, Blackorby A, Cizman B, Cobitz AR, Davies R, DiMino TL, Kler L, Meadowcroft AM, Taft L, Perkovic V. Daprodustat for the Treatment of Anemia in Patients Not Undergoing Dialysis. N Engl J Med 2021;385(25):2313-2324. PM: 34739196.

Singh AK, Carroll K, Perkovic V, Solomon S, Jha V, Johansen KL, Lopes RD, Macdougall IC, Obrador GT, Waikar SS, Wanner C, Wheeler DC, Więcek A, Blackorby A, Cizman B, Cobitz AR, Davies R, Dole J, Kler L, Meadowcroft AM, Zhu X, McMurray JJV. Daprodustat for the Treatment of Anemia in Patients Undergoing Dialysis. N Engl J Med 2021;385(25):2325-2335. PM: 34739194.

Watanabe JH, Simon GE, Horberg M, Platt R, Hernandez A, Califf RM. When Are Treatment Blinding and Treatment Standardization Necessary in Real-World Clinical Trials? Clin Pharmacol Ther 2022;111(1):116-121. PM: 33829639.

Division of Cardiology Publications Indexed in PubMed Dec 23, 2021-Jan 5, 2022

Ariss RW, Minhas AMK, Issa R, Ahuja KR, Patel MM, Eltahawy EA, Michos ED, Fudim M, Nazir S. Demographic and Regional Trends of Mortality in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction in the United States, 1999 to 2019. Am J Cardiol 2022;164:7-13. PM: 34857365.

Bekfani T, Hamadanchi A, Ijuin S, Bekhite M, Nisser J, Derlien S, Westphal J, Bogoviku J, Morris DA, Fudim M, Braun-Dullaeus RC, Möbius-Winkler S, Schulze PC. Relation of left atrial function with exercise capacity and muscle endurance in patients with heart failure. ESC Heart Fail 2021;8(6):4528-4538. PM: 34726343.

Breathett KK, Xu H, Sweitzer NK, Calhoun E, Matsouaka RA, Yancy CW, Fonarow GC, DeVore AD, Bhatt DL, Peterson PN. Is the affordable care act medicaid expansion associated with receipt of heart failure guideline-directed medical therapy by race and ethnicity? Am Heart J 2022;244:135-148. PM: 34813771.

Chew DS, Li Z, Steinberg BA, O’Brien E, Pritchard J, Bunch TJ, Mark DB, Patel MR, Nabutovsky Y, Greiner MA, Piccini JP. Association between economic and arrhythmic burden of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cardiac implanted electronic devices. Am Heart J 2022;244:116-124. PM: 34800369.

Do WL, Nguyen S, Yao J, Guo X, Whitsel EA, Demerath E, Rotter JI, Rich SS, Lange L, Ding J, Van Den Berg D, Liu Y, Justice AE, Guan W, Horvath S, Assimes TL, Bhatti P, Jordahl K, Shadyab A, Valencia CI, Stein AD, Smith A, Staimez LR, Conneely K, Narayan K. Associations between DNA methylation and BMI vary by metabolic health status: a potential link to disparate cardiovascular outcomes. Clin Epigenetics 2021;13(1):230. PM: 34937574.

Fudim M, Borges-Neto S. Utility of diastolic dyssynchrony in the setting of cardiac resynchronization therapy. J Nucl Cardiol 2021;28(6):2644-2646. PM: 31512196.

Gaudino M, Di Franco A, Alexander JH, Bakaeen F, Egorova N, Kurlansky P, Boening A, Chikwe J, Demetres M, Devereaux PJ, Diegeler A, Dimagli A, Flather M, Hameed I, Lamy A, Lawton JS, Reents W, Robinson NB, Audisio K, Rahouma M, Serruys PW, Hara H, Taggart et al. Sex differences in outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting: a pooled analysis of individual patient data. Eur Heart J 2021;43(1):18-28. PM: 34338767.

Goldstein SA, Krasuski RA. Pulmonary Hypertension in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease. Cardiol Clin 2022;40(1):55-67. PM: 34809917.

Huang MN, D’Anniballe VM, Gunn MD. Monocytes as a Cellular Vaccine Platform to Induce Antitumor Immunity. Methods Mol Biol 2022;2410:627-647. PM: 34914073.

Krasuski RA. Pulmonary Hypertension. Cardiol Clin 2022;40(1):xi-xii. PM: 34809921.

Pagidipati NJ, Phelan M, Page C, Clowse M, Henao R, Peterson ED, Goldstein BA. The importance of weight stabilization amongst those with overweight or obesity: Results from a large health care system. Prev Med Rep 2021;24:101615. PM: 34976671.

Duke Heart Pulse – Week Ending December 19th 2021

Chief’s message:

Dear Duke Heart Faculty, Staff, Fellows, Residents, and Community.

Duke Chapel decorated for the Christmas holidays.

As 2021 comes to an end, we take time to reflect on the amazing accomplishments, resiliency, and teamwork of our entire Duke Heart community.   In another difficult year, we were again privileged to be able to provide healthcare to our community, to be able to lean on each other in challenging times, and to be able to celebrate joint successes.  Importantly we cherish our ability to continue to be with each other through these difficult times, frequently centering on our mission to train the next generation of heart leaders while we work to discover and deliver heart health.

So, on behalf of the Duke Heart Leadership team, we offer our heartfelt wishes of joy and health to you and your loved ones. More than ever, we recognize life is precious and hope that the season brings you peace — happiness, and warmth that comes from shared moments spent with friends and family.

Happy Holidays and Best Wishes in the upcoming year!

Highlights of the week:

Pediatric Team Receives SVRF Funding

We learned this week that Andrew Landstrom, MD, PhD, and his colleagues have been awarded a 2021 Single Ventricle Research Fund award. The funding was announced publicly on Wednesday, Dec. 15 by Additional Ventures. Landstrom will receive $660,000 ($220K for three years) to study single ventricle heart disease in the laboratory; his project is titled, “Leveraging induced pluripotent stem cells to define the developmental drivers of hypoplastic left heart syndrome.” Landstrom will serve as principal investigator; Drs. Nick Andersen and Joe Turek will serve as co-investigators.

Nicholas Andersen

The grant is particularly notable because it represents the first major funding award for the Single Ventricle Care and Research Program (SVCRP) launched in 2019 and housed within Duke’s Pediatric and Congenital Heart Center. The SVCRP is dedicated to the care of children born with single ventricle heart disease and improving their survival and quality of life. Their multi-disciplinary team is dedicated to the longitudinal care of these patients, from fetal life through adulthood. The program is led by Nick Andersen, surgical director; Andrew McCrary, cardiology director, and Veera Allareddy, medical director.

Congratulations to all!!!

Lee Completes EP Fellowship; Will Return to Military Service

Joshua Lee, DO, a fellow in the Duke Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology Fellowship program, is completing his training with us this month and then heading back to San Antonio, TX. There, he will complete his military service with the U.S. Army and put his new skillset to work caring for patients at Brooke Army Medical Center, a 400-bed hospital situated at Fort Sam Houston.

Lee joined the EP fellowship in July 2019, spending the bulk of his time at Duke training during the COVID-19 pandemic. He says he chose the Duke program in part based on overall reputation, but also because he had known a former Duke EP fellow serving in the U.S. Army who had raved about their training here.

“When I first came to interview, I immediately sensed the collegiality between the EP attendings, as well as between the fellows and the attendings,” Lee says. “I knew I’d pick up excellent skills and knowledge here, but I also felt that I’d be joining a supportive, encouraging team who would provide great mentorship.”

He says that beyond the supportive environment, one of the things that really stood out to him was the emphasis on the importance of teamwork.

“Patient care is not just about offering a knowledgeable team of physicians,” Lee states. “It’s a holistic partnership involving EP technicians, EP staff, cardiologists, surgeons and general medicine – it’s all about teamwork. This has really been emphasized during my years here at Duke and it’s very similar to my work in the Army where you have a core group of people working together. You really develop a strong bond with others on your team.”

Electrophysiology began to intrigue Lee while he was practicing as a general cardiologist in San Antonio. During that time, he encountered a cardiac sarcoid patient with a recurrent ventricular tachycardia (VT). An electrophysiologist on the team performed a procedure and afterward the patient was shown to have no signs of VT and felt a lot better.

“It’s amazing how procedures, skills and knowledge are always improving in the EP field,” adds Lee. “Medicine is lifelong learning. I now have some great tools and resources that I’ve picked up during my time here at Duke and I am excited to keep learning more.”

Lee has four more years of commitment to fulfill with the Army and is looking forward to assisting in the training of general cardiology fellows when he gets back to Brooke Army Medical Center.

“It is very bittersweet to leave Duke, and while I feel sad about that, I am so excited to move on to another adventure,” Lee says. “I am so thankful to the many people that I have worked with here, especially the small group of EP attendings who work with our fellowship program. Everyone has been so easy to work with and it has been really fun. I felt happy every day to be here.”

It’s clear that Lee made just as big an impact on the EP team as they did on him.

“We are really grateful to have had Josh in our EP fellowship program during the trying and difficult times of the COVID pandemic,” said Jonathan Piccini, MD, associate professor of medicine and director of Duke Electrophysiology. “He has inspired all of us with his eternal optimism, refreshing smile, and the kindness he extends to everyone. He always goes the extra mile for every single one of his patients. We know the San Antonio area and military will be very fortunate to have Lt. Colonel Lee taking care of them and keeping their hearts in rhythm. We salute you Dr. Lee and thank you for your service to Duke, our country, and the US Armed Forces!”

Congratulations, Josh! We look forward to tracking your career and wish you all the best.

 

Duke Heart Network Welcomes Kotyra as new Senior Director

Duke Network Services is happy to introduce Lisa Kotyra, RN, MSBA, ACNP, as the new Senior Director of the Duke Heart Network.

Lisa comes to Duke Network Services after practicing in the Advanced Heart Failure Program at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) as a Senior Nurse Practitioner and the Program Administrator. Lisa had been with Advanced Heart Failure since 2004 and has experience managing one of the largest VAD centers in the US (behind Duke). Additionally, Lisa’s role included oversight of both CMS and the Joint Commission regulatory processes for Advanced Heart Failure and VAD.  Throughout her career, Lisa has cared for cardiovascular patients, including time spent as a nurse practitioner in the URMC Cardiothoracic ICU and in a private, community cardiology practice in both inpatient and outpatient roles.  Lisa has been a longstanding member of the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC); most recently serving as the NY State representative for the national ACC CV Team.

 

Lisa received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from State University of New York at Binghamton. She received her Masters of Science in Nursing (Acute Care NP Program/Critical Care) from the University of Rochester and her Masters of Science in Business Administration from the Simon Business School at the University of Rochester.

Lisa enjoys paddle boarding, hiking and traveling with family — perfect for our NC landscape. She is married with three children – one of whom is 26, and twins who are 19.

Please give her a warm welcome when you are able to do so!

 

Outing with Califf

Saturday, December 11, brought a fun outing with Rob Califf – Duke and UNC cardiologists Kristin Newby, Sid Smith (UNC), Magnus Ohman and Chris Granger spent the day out on the links helping to “prep” Califf for his FDA Commissioner Senate hearing, which was held on Tuesday, Dec. 14.

For more on the hearing, please visit: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/politics/watch-live-senate-hearing-on-the-nomination-of-robert-califf-as-commissioner-of-fda.

 

Ginsburg Celebrated, Pre-Departure for NIH

The team at Duke’s Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine (CAGPM) gathered this week to honor Geoff Ginsburg in his final days as Center director. Ginsburg, a faculty member in our division of cardiology, is leaving Duke to take on the role of Chief Medical and Scientific Officer for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) All of Us Research Program starting next month. In a recent message to the CAGPM, he said, “Transitions are great opportunities for everyone. I am extremely confident in this team, in your future growth and successes, and that Duke CAGPM will continue to be at the forefront of genomics and precision medicine.”

We wish him all the best in his exciting new role and look forward to staying in touch!

Kudos to Ouyang

We received some terrific feedback from a patient recently on behalf of Wendy Chian Ouyang, one of our terrific nurse practitioners.

The patient’s note states: “Wen a gentle spirit, she is. Dr. Glower picked a great lady, caring, kind and a loving spirit. Super attentive.”

Thank you for the care and the compassion you show to all of the patients you provide care for, Wendy! We are very happy that you joined our team.Diane Sauro, MSN, ANP, NEA-BC, Director-Advanced Practice, Duke Heart Center

Way to go, Wendy!

ICYMI: Final Tributes – Duke Univ & Health System Passings, 2021

We lost several members of our Duke Heart family in 2021. The University published a full list of all staff, faculty and retirees who passed away this past year, through November. To access that publication, please visit: https://bit.ly/3J3zBfB.

Happy Holidays & Reminder from the Pulse!

We wish each of you a calm, peaceful and joy-filled holiday season. Duke Heart Pulse will not be published on Dec. 26 or Jan. 2. We’ll be back on Sunday, Jan. 9. Be safe and healthy out there and we’ll see you in the New Year!

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

Duke Well-Being Ambassador Virtual Course

January 11 – March 15: The Well-being Essentials for Learning Life-Balance (WELL-B) weekly webinar series begins January 11, 2022 at 3 p.m. EST. For only one hour a week for 10 weeks (with an optional 11th week for sharing content with colleagues), healthcare workers can learn about the science and practice of well-being from Dr. Bryan Sexton, Dr. Carrie Adair, and Dr. Kyle Rehder. These strategies can enhance your well-being, and through sharing, the well-being of your co-workers. Available to all Duke Health employees and those outside of Duke as well. More information: bit.ly/dukewellb. Offered by the Duke Center for Healthcare Safety and Quality.

Duke Research Week 2022

January 31 – February 4: Registration is now open for Duke Research Week 2022. Join us virtually for a week-long celebration of research underway at Duke! There is an excellent lineup of faculty lectures, panel discussions, “flash talks” with graduate students, trainees and postdoctoral fellows, and guest presenters for the Robert J. Lefkowitz, MD, Distinguished Lecture and Daubechies Lecture. Check out the full agenda here: https://dukeresearchweek.vfairs.com/en/#distinguishedlectures

 

Save the Date: Wear Your Red

Friday, Feb. 4: National Wear Red Day. Seriously team, put this one on the calendar! It’s never too early to start thinking of what you can wear on National Wear Red Day — red running shoes? Heart socks? The perfect red top or sweater? A cool red tie? What about that AHA gear you picked up at the last in-person Sessions? Stock up, plan ahead and have plenty of attire to wear throughout heart month to help promote cardiovascular disease awareness — and YES — we would love to have individual and team photos to share in Pulse!!

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged. Submissions by Noon, Wednesdays, to be considered for weekend inclusion. Note: Pulse is taking a break for the holidays (Dec. 26, Jan. 2). We’ll return on Jan. 9, 2022!

Duke Heart in the News:

December 13 — Manesh Patel

tctMD

World-wise: As In-Person Meetings Resume, Global Voices Hope to Be Heard

https://duke.is/g4tz7

December 14 — Stephen Greene

Medscape

Metformin Benefits Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure

https://duke.is/w6c3p

December 15 — Svati Shah

Associated Press

$10 million invested to study long-term impact of COVID-19 on heart and brain health

https://duke.is/vdmnw

December 15 — Svati Shah

dicardiology.com

AHA Funds Research on Underlying Causes and Therapies for Cardiovascular Impacts of Long COVID

https://duke.is/ze76a

December 15 — Sunil Rao

Healio/Cardiology Today

DES systems to facilitate transradial PCI receive FDA approval

https://duke.is/mgxbq

December 15 — Rajesh Swaminathan

tctMD

Discharge Safe as Early as a Day After Primary PCI for STEMI

https://duke.is/85yyr

Duke Heart Pulse 12-12-2021

Highlights of the week:

Latest DUH Adult Cardiac Surgery Program STS Ratings

We learned this week that our Adult Cardiac Surgery program has earned 3-star quality ratings for all ranked categories from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). The 3-star ratings were earned for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures; isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) surgery; for AVR + CABG, and for isolated mitral valve replacement and repair (MVRR) surgery.

The Duke University Hospital STS Risk Adjusted Harvest 3 report includes analyzed results for the 3-year period spanning July 2018 to June 2021.

The STS star rating system is one of the most sophisticated and highly regarded overall measures of quality in health care, rating the benchmarked outcomes of cardiothoracic surgery programs in the U.S. The star rating is calculated using a combination of quality measures for specific procedures performed by an STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database (ACSD) participant.

Established in 1989 as an initiative for quality improvement and patient safety among cardiothoracic surgeons, the STS ACSD houses more than 6.5 million surgical records and gathers information from more than 3,800 participating physicians, including surgeons and anesthesiologists from more than 90 percent of groups that perform heart surgery in the U.S. The Database includes three other components: the Congenital Heart Surgery Database (CHSD), the General Thoracic Surgery Database (GTSD), and the mechanical circulatory support database (Intermacs). Duke has participated in the STS National Database since its inception.

This achievement is the result of the effort the entire Duke Heart team puts in every day — across the board – our nurses, residents, fellows, CT surgeons, anesthesiologists, ICU teams, cardiologists, pharmacy leaders, cardiac rehabilitation team and all those who support them. Congratulations!

CVRC Announces Annual Mandel Awards

The Duke Cardiovascular Research Center (CVRC) has recently announced their annual Mandel Awards. The Mandel Funding Program Review Committee made three awards in the Seed program, one award in the Fellow program, and one in the Scholar program. We are pleased to share the projects and scholars receiving funding for the 2022 project period which begins January 1.

Mandel Scholar Award

Ravi Karra, MD

Ravi Karra

Project: Correction of LMNA Cardiomyopathy by Cardioediting

Dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM) due to genetic mutations are common and more likely to progress to end stage heart failure compared to other types of DCM. Here, we propose the development of a system to treat genetic DCM by correcting the causal mutation, using LMNA DCM as an example. We will develop tools to genetically edit LMNA mutations and develop an ultrasound-based method to deliver these tools to the heart. These experiments can establish “cardioediting” as a potential treatment of heritable DCM.

 

Mandel Fellow Award

Pavitra Murali, PhD, mentored by Sudha Shenoy, PhD

Project: Trafficking of Angiotensin Receptors into autophagosomes and its impact on

β-arrestin-dependent signaling

Drugs that bind to the extracellular domains of cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are used to treat a variety of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension. Activated GPCRs trigger a signal transduction cascade that produces physiological responses including contraction/relaxation of smooth muscle cells lining arteries. GPCRs, which are bound by drugs at the plasma membrane, rapidly internalize into the cell into intracellular vesicles called endosomes and subsequently traffic into highly acidic vesicles called lysosomes where the GPCR protein is degraded into small peptides. This degradation ensures the long-term desensitization or dampening of signaling and subsiding of the physiological action. We have found that internalized angiotensin type II receptor (AT1R) localizes into a distinct population of vesicles called autophagosomes, which is an unexpected phenomenon because the pathway that invokes formation of autophagosomes called autophagy is known only for recycling organelles and protein catabolism during cell starvation. Since agonist Ang II provokes autophagy trafficking of the AT1R, we believe that this sub-cellular localization may have putative roles in defining AT1R signaling and physiologic effects. The AT1R is an essential target for drugs used to treat many forms of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension; recent evidence reveals that the AT1R mediates its physiologic effects through both G protein and β-arrestin-dependent pathways. In this proposal, I will study how the autophagy trafficking of the AT1R is regulated, and determine the relevance of this trafficking pathway to AT1R signal transduction. The proposed studies will uncover hitherto unknown molecular mechanisms in AT1R trafficking and signaling and might provide new therapeutic angles to treat high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

 

Mandel Seed Awards

Neil Freedman, MD and Christopher Holley, MD, PhD

Christopher Holley

Project: Atherogenic Mechanisms of Small Nucleolar RNAs

Atherosclerosis fundamentally involves oxidation, a chemical process that is critical for

normal cell function. When oxidation is excessive, it deranges the chemical structure of lipids and proteins and thereby adversely affects their function. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis initiates with oxidation of the cholesterol-rich low-density lipoprotein particles, and perpetuates with excessive oxidative cell signaling—termed “oxidative stress”—in the inner layers of the artery. This project aims to attenuate excessive oxidative signaling through a novel regulatory mechanism involving particular RNA molecules known as small nucleolar RNAs, or “snoRNAs”, which are expressed throughout the body’s cells. We have found a group of four snoRNAs that augment cellular oxidative stress (Rpl13a-snoRNAs); they appear to do so by facilitating the modification of various messenger RNAs with 2’-O-methylation—a modification that reduces the translation of the messenger RNA into protein.

With previous support from the Mandel Foundation, we found that genetic deficiency of these snoRNAs in Apoe-/- mice reduces arterial levels of reactive oxygen species and attenuates atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we found that snoRNA deficiency in smooth muscle cells dramatically increases the expression of a mitochondrial protein (COX4i2) that reduces mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, we hypothesize that snoRNAs augment the level of reactive oxygen species in vascular cells by methylating the messenger RNA encoding COX4i2 and thereby reducing the cellular level of COX4i2 protein.

The Mandel Seed Grant will allow us to continue our snoRNA atherosclerosis studies until we can secure NIH funding. Specifically, this new application seeks to achieve the following aims: (1) to determine whether antagonizing snoRNA function with antisense oligonucleotides reduces atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr-/-) mice, and thereby to determine whether snoRNAs can be targeted therapeutically, and (2) to determine in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages whether the pre-mRNA encoding COX4i2 is a target of snoRNA-guided methylation, and thereby to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of snoRNAs on cellular oxidative stress. Completing these aims will advance our work toward publishing our first manuscript and obtaining NIH support for our ongoing investigations into the anti-atherogenic therapeutic potential of snoRNA-targeted strategies.

 

Christopher Kontos, MD

Project: Regulation of endothelial metabolism by the Tie1 receptor tyrosine kinase

In the presence of oxygen, cells typically generate energy by breaking down glucose through glycolysis, and then the byproduct, pyruvate, is used by mitochondria to generate ATP through aerobic respiration. Under anaerobic conditions lacking oxygen, cells are unable to utilize mitochondrial respiration, and after glycolysis, pyruvate gets converted to lactate, which is then shuttled out of the cell. Although oxidative metabolism is more efficient than anaerobic glycolytic metabolism in terms of energy production, some cells paradoxically utilize glycolysis as their main form of energy production even in the presence of oxygen.

This phenomenon of “aerobic glycolysis”, was first described by Dr. Otto Warburg (also known as the “Warburg Effect”) in cancer cells. Interestingly, aerobic glycolysis occurs not only in aberrant cancer cells, but it is the primary metabolic pathway that endothelial cells lining the vasculature use to generate energy. Alterations in endothelial cell metabolism are a hallmark of their activation, which occurs during new blood vessel growth and inflammation, and while this activation may be helpful in some contexts, e.g., growth of new blood vessels in response to exercise, the activation of endothelial cells in large arteries can be harmful and lead to atherosclerosis and high blood pressure. When endothelial cells are activated, their metabolism changes to increase their rate of glycolysis, but how they do this is not completely understood.

We hypothesize that the endothelial receptor tyrosine kinase Tie1, which is increased in activated endothelial cells, is partially responsible for altering the metabolism of these activated endothelial cells, and that blocking Tie1’s role in this metabolic shift may help prevent vascular dysfunction and subsequent cardiovascular disease.

Huanghe Yang, PhD

Project: Demystify flow-activated chloride conductance in endothelium and its role in hypertension

Mechanical forces are fundamental in cardiovascular health and disease. Lining the interior surface of blood vessels, the endothelium constantly senses blood flow-induced shear and stretch forces and converts these mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals. Endothelial mechanotransduction is therefore central for both acute vasoregulation and chronic vascular remodeling; and malfunction of endothelial mechanotransduction contributes to cardiovascular diseases including hypertension and atherosclerosis. Mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs) are the primary mechanotransducers in the endothelium. The endothelial MSCs, including the recently discovered mechanosensitive PIEZO1 calcium permeable channel, have been extensively investigated. Nevertheless, the molecular identity and pathophysiological role of an endothelial flow-activated chloride conductance (FACC) still remain elusive.

Our preliminary results showed that the FACC is significantly upregulated in angiotensin II (Ang II)-treated endothelial cells in vitro, highlighting the urgency to uncover its molecular identity and contribution in hypertension. With this Seed Grant, we aim to acquire critical preliminary results to strengthen our hypothesis that the functional coupling between Piezo1 mechanosensitive calcium channel and TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) gives rise to the FACC and enhanced endothelial FACC contributes to hypertension. I anticipate to utilize this opportunity to establish collaborations with CVRC investigators and submit an NIH R01 to further understand FACC in endothelial biology and diseases.

Congratulations to all Mandel funding recipients – we look forward to learning more about your work!

ICYMI: 2021 ACC/AHA/SCAI Guideline for Coronary Artery Revascularization

Congratulations to Brittany Zwischenberger and Sunil Rao, two members of the writing team for the latest Guidelines for Coronary Artery Revascularization which were co-published online in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and in Circulation on Thursday. ACC/AHA Joint committee members from Duke include: Sana Al-Khatib, Adrian Hernandez, W. Schuyler Jones, and Dan Mark.

Brittany Zwischenberger

 

Congratulations to Helen Barnes!

Duke Heart’s leadership team wishes to congratulate Helen Barnes who graduated yesterday from University of Mount Olive with a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration in Healthcare Management.

“Helen is a great asset who is always willing to partner on new projects with a ready smile and kind words,” said Laura Blue, DNP, VAD Program Team Lead. “I am so proud of her for pursuing her dream of getting her degree and I think she is a great role model for others who wish to pursue their education. Helen was a big supporter of mine when I was working on my doctorate. When she came to me and let me know she felt she could achieve this, I wanted to support her as much as she had supported me. I am really excited for her.”

Barnes, a dedicated member of the Duke family since 1999, has functioned as an administrative assistant with the Duke’s Ventricular Assist Device program for 11 years. Helen partnered with leadership to develop and successfully lead her final project, “Optimizing Incoming Communication in a Multidisciplinary Subspecialty Clinic.”

Congratulations, Helen!

Hofmeister Lands Emerging Leaders Grant

Karl Hofmeister, a 2021 graduate of Duke’s Cardiac Ultrasound Certificate program, has been selected by the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography (SDMS) Foundation for their 2022 Emerging Leaders Grant Recipient Program. Hofmeister’s cohort will participate virtually in a variety of leadership education opportunities that are designed to engage them in meaningful dialogue and projects related to the future of the profession and leadership volunteerism.

Hofmeister was the first recipient of our Cardiac Ultrasound Certificate program’s inaugural outstanding student award, which is now named after Joseph Kisslo, MD.

The Emerging Leaders program will culminate with one participant being selected to receive a grant to attend the Fall SDMS and SDMS Foundation Board of Directors Meetings, Liaison Meetings, and the 2022 SDMS Annual Conference.

Congratulations, Karl!

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

SI4R Training Workshop

December 14: Stepping in 4-Respect (SI4R) Workshop for Duke Division of Cardiology. 5-7 p.m. Zoom (Details in email from Kim Dorman)

As part of the Department of Medicine Civility Champion initiatives, a 2-hr zoom workshop for all faculty, staff, and trainees throughout all DOM divisions has been developed. Civility Champions are trained faculty, fellows, and chief residents who provide informal support in response to incidents of bias, harassment, or other unprofessional behaviors, and to help those affected understand their options for intervention and reporting. People generally come to Civility Champions after the fact, and the Champions debrief their experiences every quarter.

The workshop that Drs. John Duronville, Jane Gagliardi, Anita Kelsey, Camille Frazier-Mills, Daniella Zipkin, Laura Previll, and Sophia Weinmann will be presenting to the Cardiology clinical faculty is entitled Stepping In 4-Respect. It is being offered twice and is a new component of these civility efforts designed to teach faculty the skills needed to step in (be an “upstander”) in the moment, with a particular focus on race-, ethnicity- and gender-based incidents. This workshop is supported by Dr. Kathleen Cooney, Chair of the DOM, and will be provided to each division’s faculty over the coming months.

Please be sure to attend the workshop on Dec. 14 if you missed the one on Nov. 30. Additional details about registration, the structure and goals of the workshop appeared in the email invitation.

 

Duke Well-Being Ambassador Virtual Course

January 11 – March 15: The Well-being Essentials for Learning Life-Balance (WELL-B) weekly webinar series begins January 11, 2022 at 3 p.m. EST. For only one hour a week for 10 weeks, healthcare workers can learn about the science and practice of well-being from Dr. Bryan Sexton, Dr. Carrie Adair, and Dr. Kyle Rehder. These strategies can enhance your well-being, and through sharing, the well-being of your co-workers. Available to all Duke Health employees and those outside of Duke as well. More information: bit.ly/dukewellb. Offered by the Duke Center for Healthcare Safety and Quality.

 

Duke Research Week 2022

January 31 – February 4: Registration is now open for Duke Research Week 2022. Join us virtually for a week-long celebration of research underway at Duke! There is an excellent lineup of faculty lectures, panel discussions, “flash talks” with graduate students, trainees and postdoctoral fellows, and guest presenters for the Robert J. Lefkowitz, MD, Distinguished Lecture and Daubechies Lecture. Check out the full agenda here: https://dukeresearchweek.vfairs.com/en/#distinguishedlectures

Save the Date: Wear Your Red

Friday, Feb. 4: National Wear Red Day. Seriously team, put this one on the calendar! It’s never too early to start thinking of what you can wear on National Wear Red Day — red running shoes? Heart socks? The perfect red top or sweater? A cool red tie? What about that AHA gear you picked up at the last in-person Sessions? Stock up, plan ahead and have plenty of attire to wear throughout heart month to help promote cardiovascular disease awareness — and YES — we would love to have individual and team photos to share in Pulse!!

Save the Date: Support the Marfan Foundation

February 11: An Evening with Heart to benefit The Marfan Foundation. 7-10 p.m. at The Maxwell in Raleigh, NC. A Valentine’s Day weekend event with silent auction, cocktails, heavy hors d’oeuvres and entertainment. Cocktail attire. Tickets required. For information, visit: https://bit.ly/3cHIBYD.

The Duke Center for Aortic Disease, led by cardiovascular surgeon Chad Hughes, works closely with Marfan patients, their family members and the Marfan Foundation. We are the only location in NC offering access to comprehensive aortic surgical interventions as well as coordinated cardiovascular care and genetic counseling for patients with Marfan syndrome and other connective tissue disorders such as Loeys-Dietz. If you’re interested in learning more about the work being done at Duke or would like to partner or otherwise get involved, please contact Dr. Hughes or Melissa Merrill Burkett, ACNP.

 

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged. Submissions by Noon, Wednesdays, to be considered for weekend inclusion. Note: Pulse will be taking a break for the holidays from Dec. 26 through Jan. 2; we’ll return on Jan. 9, 2022!

 

Duke Heart in the News:

December 3 — E. Hope Weissler and W. Schuyler Jones

tctMD

Statins Underprescribed in PAD Before and After Interventions

https://duke.is/722jz

December 7 — E. Hope Weissler and W. Schuyler Jones

Physician’s Weekly

PAD: Statin Prescribing After Revascularization Still Low

https://duke.is/mmhc7

December 8 — Amanda Coniglio

NIH

Rare gene mutation in some Black Americans may allow earlier screening of heart failure

https://bit.ly/3IGG8N5

December 9 — Duke University Hospital

Becker’s Hospital Review

27 cardiology firsts in 2021

https://bit.ly/3lVQ77f

December 9 — Amanda Coniglio

Clinicalomics

Mutation Linked to Heart Failure in People of African Descent

https://bit.ly/3EKmCNf

Division of Cardiology Publications Indexed in PubMed December 2-8, 2021

Becher PM, Schrage B, Benson L, Fudim M, Corovic Cabrera C, Dahlström U, Rosano GMC, Jankowska EA, Anker SD, Lund LH, Savarese G. Phenotyping heart failure patients for iron deficiency and use of intravenous iron therapy: data from the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Eur J Heart Fail 2021:10.1002/ejhf.2338. PM: 34476878.

Bernstein E, Wang TY. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography: Visually Satisfying Medicine or Evidence-Based Medicine? JAMA Intern Med 2021:10.1001/jamainternmed.2021.5831. PM: 34633409.

Carnicelli AP, Li Z, Greiner MA, Lippmann SJ, Greene SJ, Mentz RJ, Hardy NC, Blumer V, Shen X, Yancy CW, Peterson PN, Allen LA, Fonarow GC, O’Brien EC. Sacubitril/Valsartan Adherence and Postdischarge Outcomes Among Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction. JACC Heart Fail 2021;9(12):876-886. PM: 34509408.

Del Rosario M, Guduguntla V, Wang TY. Nonfatal Myocardial Infarction-Poor Surrogate for Mortality. JAMA Intern Med 2021:10.1001/jamainternmed.2021.5713. PM: 34694340.

Escaned J, Cao D, Baber U, Nicolas J, Sartori S, Zhang Z, Dangas G, Angiolillo DJ, Briguori C, Cohen DJ, Collier T, Dudek D, Gibson M, Gil R, Huber K, Kaul U, Kornowski R, Krucoff MW, Kunadian V, Mehta S, Moliterno DJ, Ohman EM, Oldroyd KG, Sardella G, et al. Ticagrelor monotherapy in patients at high bleeding risk undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: TWILIGHT-HBR. Eur Heart J 2021;42(45):4624-4634. PM: 34662382.

Hess CN, Debus ES, Nehler MR, Anand SS, Patel MR, Szarek M, Capell WH, Hsia J, Beckman JA, Brodmann M, Diaz R, Habertheuer P, Leeper NJ, Powell RJ, Sillesen H, Muehlhofer E, Berkowitz SD, Haskell LP, Bauersachs RM, Bonaca MP. Reduction in Acute Limb Ischemia with Rivaroxaban versus Placebo in Peripheral Artery Disease after Lower Extremity Revascularization: Insights from VOYAGER PAD. Circulation 2021:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.121.055146. PM: 34637332.

Hsia J, Kavanagh ST, Hopley CW, Baumgartner I, Berger JS, Fowkes GR, Jones WS, Mahaffey KW, Norgren L, Patel MR, Rockhold F, Blomster J, Katona BG, Hiatt WR, Bonaca MP. Impact of chronic kidney disease on hemoglobin among patients with peripheral artery disease treated with P2Y inhibitors: Insights from the EUCLID trial. Vasc Med 2021;26(6):608-612. PM: 34082620.

Ma Z, Viswanathan G, Sellig M, Jassal C, Choi I, Garikipati A, Xiong X, Nazo N, Rajagopal S. β-Arrestin-Mediated Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Activation Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension. JACC Basic Transl Sci 2021;6(11):854-869. PM: 34869949.

Mack M, Carroll JD, Thourani V, Vemulapalli S, Squiers J, Manandhar P, Deeb GM, Batchelor W, Herrmann HC, Cohen DJ, Hanzel G, Gleason T, Kirtane A, Desai N, Guibone K, Hardy K, Michaels J, DiMaio JM, Christensen B, Fitzgerald S, Krohn C, Brindis RG, et al. Transcatheter Mitral Valve Therapy in the United States: A Report From the STS-ACC TVT Registry. J Am Coll Cardiol 2021;78(23):2326-2353. PM: 34711430.

Manolio TA, Bult CJ, Chisholm RL, Deverka PA, Ginsburg GS, Goldrich M, Jarvik GP, Mensah GA, Ramos EM, Relling MV, Roden DM, Rowley R, Williams MS, Green ED. Genomic medicine year in review: 2021. Am J Hum Genet 2021;108(12):2210-2214. PM: 34861172.

Matsue Y, Sama IE, Postmus D, Metra M, Greenberg BH, Cotter G, Davison BA, Felker GM, Filippatos G, Pang P, Ponikowski P, Severin T, Gimpelewicz C, Voors AA, Teerlink JR. Association of Early Blood Pressure Decrease and Renal Function With Prognosis in Acute Heart Failure. JACC Heart Fail 2021;9(12):890-903. PM: 34627724.

Salah HM, Pandey A, Soloveva A, Abdelmalek MF, Diehl AM, Moylan CA, Wegermann K, Rao VN, Hernandez AF, Tedford RJ, Parikh KS, Mentz RJ, McGarrah RW, Fudim M. Relationship of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction. JACC Basic Transl Sci 2021;6(11):918-932. PM: 34869957.

Salisbury AC, Safley DM, Kennedy KF, Bhardwaj B, Aronow HD, Jones WS, Feldman DN, Secemsky E, Tsai TT, Attaran RR, Spertus JA. Development and validation of a predictive model for bleeding after peripheral vascular intervention: A report from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry Peripheral Vascular Interventions Registry. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2021;98(7):1363-1372. PM: 34569709.

Samsky MD, Mentz RJ, Stebbins A, Lokhnygina Y, Aday AW, Pagidipati NJ, Jones WS, Katona BG, Patel MR, Holman RR, Hernandez AF, Gutierrez JA. Polyvascular disease and increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes: Insights from the EXSCEL trial. Atherosclerosis 2021;338:1-6. PM: 34741929.

Stefanini GG, Briguori C, Cao D, Baber U, Sartori S, Zhang Z, Dangas G, Angiolillo DJ, Mehta S, Cohen DJ, Collier T, Dudek D, Escaned J, Gibson CM, Gil R, Huber K, Kaul U, Kornowski R, Krucoff MW, Kunadian V, Moliterno DJ, Ohman EM, Oldroyd KG, Sardella G. Ticagrelor monotherapy in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: TWILIGHT-CKD. Eur Heart J 2021;42(45):4683-4693. PM: 34423374.

Weissler EH, Jones WS. Who Will Own the Responsibility to Prescribe Statins? Tragedy of the Commons. JAMA Netw Open 2021;4(12):e2137605. PM: 34860247.

 

Duke Heart Pulse week ending 12-5-2021

Highlights of the week:

New Faculty Spotlight: Brandy Patterson, MD

Brandy Patterson

One of our newest faculty members, Brandy Patterson, MD, joined the Duke Heart faculty in July as an assistant professor of medicine in the division of cardiology. She is a welcome addition to our growing cardio-oncology program and member of the general cardiology team, seeing patients at Duke Cardiology’s South Durham clinic; in Clinic 2F/2G, and in the Duke Cancer Center.

Patterson completed fellowship in cardiology at the University of Florida after earning her MD from the Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami, and completing residency at Allegheny General Hospital in Pennsylvania. During fellowship she became fully attuned to the lack of women enrolled in research clinical trials — particularly those focused on cardiovascular disease — and realized how much work was still needed to educate women about their risk for developing heart disease.

“I was lucky to join the fellowship program in Florida when I did. There were a large number of female faculty members there and they all understood this problem,” Patterson said. “Many women attribute early-onset heart symptoms simply to getting older, or to putting on a bit of weight.  I was astounded by the number of female patients I was seeing that did not recognize heart disease as a woman’s disease. I knew I needed to do something about this.”

After fellowship, she joined the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania where her clinical focus was on treating women with heart disease. From there, she headed to the University of Virginia where she launched a number of efforts aimed at women – she started a women’s heart health group called ‘Club Red’; organized regular community talks for women; partnered with a nutritionist to hold regular community cooking classes; and led walks in the community, all to better engage with women around living a heart-healthy lifestyle. She was able to take her messaging further when she became a regular guest on the local NBC news affiliate in Charlottesville, where they had a medical news segment called ‘House Call’ and then developed one with Patterson in mind, called ‘Straight Talk MD’.

As these community efforts were gaining momentum, a fellow faculty member left UVA and Patterson inherited a number of her patients — many of whom had received treatment for breast and other cancers. As she saw more and more heart patients with a history of cancer treatment, she became increasingly interested in understanding the cardiotoxicity associated with the drugs her patients were or had been taking. Her exploration into this area led her to spearhead the creation of UVA’s cardio-oncology program with two other cardiologists there – a team she led as medical director until her departure for Duke.

Patterson, who was raised in South Florida, was drawn to medicine from an early age. Her mother, an operating room nurse, periodically brought her to the hospital in which she worked. There, she had ample opportunity to observe her mother’s work, her interactions with colleagues and patients, and to learn about the OR space. Her father, a former professional baseball player who pitched for the New York Yankees, endured a number of injuries over time that required surgical intervention, rehabilitation and physical therapy.

“I really developed a deep understanding of what the patient experience is like by living in the footsteps of not only my mother, but my father and his experiences with numerous orthopedic surgeries and the toll it took on us as a family,” Patterson said while reflecting on her choice to pursue a career in medicine. “I wanted to develop and maintain a personal connection with people to increase patient’s healthy life years without disability.”

Having grown up with athletic parents, she was involved in multiple sports from an early age and has always been drawn to living a healthy lifestyle, eating right and exercising. She says she has always has been a big advocate for the joy of movement and to following a Mediterranean-style diet. Patterson and husband Richard Shannon, MD, have a 7-year-old daughter. They enjoy playing golf and tennis, as well as hiking, swimming, and traveling.

Shannon was recruited to Duke two years ago. When the opportunity presented itself for Patterson to join Duke Heart’s growing cardio-oncology program, she jumped at the chance.

“I am very humbled to be a part of this prestigious group and am looking forward to seeing where this opportunity leads. Duke has an amazing health system and this is a tremendous opportunity for us,” she added.

If you have not yet had the opportunity to meet Brandy, we hope you’ll take time to do so. We are thrilled to have her as a member of the Duke Heart team!

 

Daubert & Team Receive $7.9M NHLBI Grant to Examine CAC Scoring

Melissa Daubert

Congratulations to Melissa Daubert and her co-investigators at Johns Hopkins and Wake Forest University. Daubert and her research partners have received a $7.9 million, five-year R01 grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to study the use of coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring to identify who is the most likely to benefit from statin therapy and in whom preventive therapy with statins may not yield a meaningful clinical benefit. CAC PREVENTABLE, an ancillary study to the Pragmatic Evaluation of Events and Benefits of Lipid-lowering in Older Adults (PREVENTABLE) Trial, will enroll 10,000 participants age 75 years and older to undergo baseline CAC scanning and high-sensitivity troponin testing. The study will be led by Melissa Daubert, MD at Duke; Michael Blaha, MD, MPH at Johns Hopkins University, and Nicholas Pajewski, PhD at Wake Forest University.

“By directly visualizing atherosclerotic plaque with CAC scanning and measuring subclinical myocardial injury with high-sensitivity troponin, we believe CAC PREVENTABLE is the most promising for informing person-centered care in older adults,” says Melissa Daubert, MD, associate professor of medicine in cardiology at Duke and director of the Multimodality Imaging Core Laboratory at Duke Clinical Research Institute. “CAC PREVENTABLE could fundamentally change the approach to preventive therapy, potentially limiting overtreatment and focusing statin therapy on those most likely to benefit.”

Current guideline-approved risk prediction models are heavily weighted by age, indiscriminately assigning high-risk status and therefore recommending treatment for nearly all older adults even before the age of 75. Accurate person-centered risk prediction at older ages remains unachievable using traditional risk factor models as these approaches do not capture lifetime cumulative exposure or account for individual resiliency to disease. It also raises concerns about overmedication, drug-drug interactions, lack of personalization, and misallocation of limited healthcare resources in an aging population which often requires multiple pharmacotherapies.

Grant funding began on Sept. 1, 2021. The team expects to enroll their first patient in March, 2022.

Congratulations, Melissa – we look forward to hearing more about this as the study progresses!

 

2022 Incoming Cardiology Fellows Announced

We are pleased to announce the newest members of the Duke Heart team — our incoming cardiology fellows for July, 2022. We are thrilled to have them join us!

Andrew Andreae, MD, joining us after completing residency at Duke; a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine.

Michael Cosiano, MD, joining us after completing residency at Duke; a graduate of Weill Cornell Medicine.

David Elliott, MD, joining us after completing residency at Duke; a graduate of Duke University School of Medicine.

Nathan Goodwin, MD, joining us after completing residency at Duke; a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Medicine.

Aman Kansal, MD, joining us after completing residency at Duke; a graduate of Duke University School of Medicine.

Allie Levin, MD, joining us after completing residency at Massachusetts General Hospital; a graduate of Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Anthony Lin, MD, joining us after completing residency at the University of California at San Francisco; a graduate of Duke University School of Medicine.

Paula Rambarat, MD, joining us after completing residency with Massachusetts General Hospital; a graduate of Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Jessica Regan, MD, joining us after completing residency at Duke; a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine.

Belal Suleiman, MD, joining us after completing residency at University of Texas Southwestern; a graduate of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine.

Congratulations to all!

Photo Submission: Joey Harrington, Journal Club

Our Journal club met this week — shown here is cardiology fellow Joey Harrington (with Tillie) presenting on the Danish LOOP Study along with Bernie Gersh. Photo courtesy of Christopher Granger.

Shout-out to Corley!

We received a note this week in appreciation of cardiology fellow, Ali Corley:

“Anna Lisa, ICC fellows were out of town, so Dr. Corley covered them at the VA today. She did a fantastic job and delivered several stents in the process. She will do great in her ICC year.” — Tony Gutierrez

Nicely done, Ali!

HF section Gathered for Holiday Cheer at the Mentz House.

The HF Section gathered together for a Holiday Party at Rob Mentz’ house on Friday Night. The group had an enjoyable evening with representation from the fellows, APPs, OHT/VAD coordinator teams, research team, cardiologists and surgeons. It was so nice to be able to get together as a group while enjoying a beautiful evening outdoors. Festive food, drinks and karaoke rounded out the evening. Thank you to the whole group for an amazing year!

 

 

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

Cardiology Grand Rounds

December 7: Visiting lecture with Anubha Agarwal of Northwestern Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine. 5 p.m. Webex.

SI4R Training Workshop

December 14: Stepping in 4-Respect (SI4R) Workshop for Duke Division of Cardiology. 5-7 p.m. Zoom (Details in email from Kim Dorman)

As part of the Department of Medicine Civility Champion initiatives, a 2-hr zoom workshop for all faculty, staff, and trainees throughout all DOM divisions has been developed. Civility Champions are trained faculty, fellows, and chief residents who provide informal support in response to incidents of bias, harassment, or other unprofessional behaviors, and to help those affected understand their options for intervention and reporting. People generally come to Civility Champions after the fact, and the Champions debrief their experiences every quarter.

The workshop that Drs. John Duronville, Jane Gagliardi, Anita Kelsey, Camille Frazier-Mills, Daniella Zipkin, Laura Previll, and Sophia Weinmann will be presenting to the Cardiology clinical faculty is entitled Stepping In 4-Respect. It is being offered twice and is a new component of these civility efforts designed to teach faculty the skills needed to step in (be an “upstander”) in the moment, with a particular focus on race-, ethnicity- and gender-based incidents. This workshop is supported by Dr. Kathleen Cooney, Chair of the DOM, and will be provided to each division’s faculty over the coming months.

Please be sure to attend the workshop on Dec. 14 if you missed the one on Nov. 30. Additional details about registration, the structure and goals of the workshop appeared in the email invitation.

Duke Well-Being Ambassador Virtual Course

January 11 – March 15: The Well-being Essentials for Learning Life-Balance (WELL-B) weekly webinar series begins January 11, 2022 at 3 p.m. EST. For only one hour a week for 10 weeks, healthcare workers can learn about the science and practice of well-being from Dr. Bryan Sexton, Dr. Carrie Adair, and Dr. Kyle Rehder. These strategies can enhance your well-being, and through sharing, the well-being of your co-workers. Available to all Duke Health employees and those outside of Duke as well. More information: bit.ly/dukewellb. Offered by the Duke Center for Healthcare Safety and Quality.

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged. Submissions by Noon, Wednesdays, to be considered for weekend inclusion. Note: Pulse will be taking a break for the holidays from Dec. 26 through Jan. 2; we’ll return on Jan. 9, 2022!

Duke Heart in the News:

November 24 — Jacob Schroder

WNCN CBS-17* (Raleigh, NC)

NC family thankful after father’s new generation artificial heart replaced with donor heart at Duke

https://duke.is/9mb9a

*story also carried by Fox-8 Greensboro, Fox-43 Myrtle Beach & NBC-10 Norfolk

November 24 — Tracy Wang

tctMD

Select COVID-19 Patients May Benefit From Postdischarge Anticoagulation

https://duke.is/jsp4y

November 26 — Jacob Schroder

WWAY ABC-3 (Wilmington, NC)

Shallotte family thankful after father’s new generation artificial heart replaced with donor heart at Duke

https://duke.is/c3eww

November 30 — Joanna Cavalier

Healio/Cardiology

EHR data reveal ‘red flag’ comorbidities years before cardiac amyloidosis diagnosis

https://duke.is/zubb8

November 30 — William Kraus

AARP

How 11 Minutes of Exercise Can Help You Live Longer

https://duke.is/m5z7z

December 1 — Kevin Thomas

Physician’s Weekly

Recognizing the Experience of Racial Minorities in the Cardiology Workforce

https://duke.is/vwf9t

 

Duke Heart Pulse 11-28-2021

Chief’s message:

Thanksgiving is a time of reflection and gratitude.  We hope of our extended Duke Heart Family and colleagues had some time to spend with family, friends and the loved ones.  Most importantly, we hope you all had some time to remember and embrace those that enrich our lives.

Highlights of the week:

Carmat Patient Receives New Human Heart

A surgical team led by Drs. Jacob Schroder and Carmelo Milano, has successfully explanted the Carmat new-generation

total artificial heart that was placed into an end-stage heart failure patient at Duke in July. Matthew Moore of Shallotte, N.C., lived with the device for four months. On Monday, Nov. 22, Moore received a donor heart during transplant surgery at Duke University Hospital.

Carmat’s artificial heart, which is approved for use in Europe, is an implantable prosthetic that includes biological valves derived from bovine tissue. It operates on an external power supply. Duke became the first center in North America to implant the prosthetic device, which is currently being studied at four U.S. locations as a bridge to transplant.

“The use of the Carmat total artificial heart system to successfully bridge a patient to heart transplantation at Duke is a milestone for heart failure patients in the United States,” said Schroder, surgical director of Duke’s heart transplant program. “The device is designed to be significantly more hemocompatible, and should greatly reduce thromboembolic events. This is a major advance from previously available devices.”

If the device receives FDA approval, it would provide a bridge to transplant for patients whose hearts require assistance to pump blood through both chambers. Current technology – notably a left-ventricular assist device (LVAD) — supports just one chamber.

“The successful performance of heart transplantation in our patient following initial use of the Carmat total artificial heart system as a temporary support measure is a first in this country,” said Edward P. Chen, MD, chief of the Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery in Duke’s Department of Surgery. “This device will ultimately transform care of patients with end stage cardiac disease. We are privileged at Duke to have a team which pursues delivery of the highest-quality patient care and is constantly looking to improve upon this care through innovation.”

Congratulations to Schroder and Jason Katz, co-principal investigators at Duke for the Carmat Total Artificial Heart (TAH) Early Feasibility Study, and to their clinical research team; to Carmelo Milano and our cardiothoracic surgical team; to Sharon McCartney, Sachin Mehta and our cardiac anesthesiology team members; to Adam DeVore and our heart failure team; to our mechanical circulatory support program; our VAD coordinators; the perfusion team, and to the nursing staff of the CTICU and clinical stepdown units.

We are truly blessed with amazing team members across Duke Heart!

Kahsai Receives CVRC’s 2021 Headley Family Award

Alem Kahsai, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine in the division of cardiology, has received the 2021 Headley Family Award for research within the Duke Cardiovascular Research Center (CVRC). The award to Kahsai, a medicinal and chemical biologist, is for his project ‘Towards understanding the roles of β-arrestins in Alzheimer’s Disease and cardiovascular disorders.’

His project aims to understand the similarities between amyloid-β peptide deposits that occur between neurons in the brain (a hallmark event in the development of Alzheimer’s disease) and cardiac amyloid-β peptide deposits in heart and vascular tissues that are the hallmark of many cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac amyloid-β peptide deposits are associated with cardiomyocyte dysfunction, while vascular deposits promote stiffening, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

There appears to be a positive correlation between increased levels of β-arrestins—key regulators of a class of cell surface receptors called G-protein-coupled receptors—with enhanced γ-secretase activity and the production of amyloid-β peptide in post-mortem brains from Alzheimer’s disease patients compared to healthy controls, Kahsai says. The mechanism by which β-arrestins regulate γ-secretase activity is elusive, and it is this mechanism that he plans to explore.

“Thanks to the Headley award, I can move forward in my research and obtain preliminary data to see the bigger picture,” says Kahsai. “We are trying to devise small molecule drugs that target β-arrestins in the context of Alzheimer’s disease as well as a number of cardiovascular problems, in particular atherosclerosis.”

Funding through the Headley Award will enable Kahsai to reconstitute each component of the γ-secretase- β-arrestin complex outside of the cell and determine how β-arrestins directly regulate γ-secretase activity and thus amyloid-β peptide production within neuronal cells. He hopes the findings from his studies will potentially open a new avenue for therapeutic development through targeting γ-secretase regulating proteins, such as β-arrestins.

He says it is paramount to identify therapeutic targets in order to slow the progression of amyloid-β peptide accumulation in the context of both cardiovascular and neurological disease.

“The CVRC is fortunate to have generous support from donors such as Mr. Headley and his family, who are interested in investing in the basic cardiovascular research that’s so necessary to continue to improve patient treatment and outcomes,” says Maria Price-Rapoza, executive director of the CVRC.

The Headley Family Award was established in 2020 and is made possible through the generosity of Harry and Dorothy Headley in support of basic cardiovascular research at Duke. The award provides annual one-year seed grants of $25,000 (plus indirect costs at 15 percent) targeted toward CVRC researchers who are conducting innovative research into the causes and treatment of hypertension, atherosclerosis and related cardiovascular diseases. The leadership of the Duke CVRC is deeply grateful for the support the Headley’s have provided to our research team.

The award is effective as of Nov. 1. Congratulations, Alem!

Katz Featured in CardioNerds Podcast

CardioNerds has launched a Cardiac Critical Care Series on their podcast and have kicked it off with an episode featuring our own Jason Katz, director of Cardiovascular Critical Care and co-director of Mechanical Circulatory Support and the CICU at Duke. Check it out here: https://apple.co/3HQMJEf.

It’s a good interview and well worth checking out. Great job and congratulations, Jason!

Jason Katz

 

Cardiac Sonography Program Update

Congratulations to Richard Palma, director of the Duke Cardiac Ultrasound Certificate Program, who was recently inducted into the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography‘s (SDMS) Board of Directors. The SDMS is the largest association of sonographers and sonography students in the world. Congrats, Richie!

Palma gave three presentations at the SDMS national meeting held Sept. 29-Oct. 2 at the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta. Palma is shown here with two of his former students who were also invited speakers at SDMS. On the left in the photo is Daniel Bourque, MS, ACS, FASE who is the lead cardiac sonographer for Orlando Regional Medical Center; in the center is Palma, and to the right is Laura Phillips, BS, RDCS, RVT, who is with Yale New Haven Hospital and serves as program director for the vascular ultrasound program at the Hoffman Heart Institute of Connecticut.

Hanukkah Wishes

On behalf of the Duke Heart leadership team, we wish all who will be celebrating Hanukkah a peaceful holiday filled with unexpected blessings. It’s up to each of us to be a light in the darkness — even a little light can go a long way.

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

 

Cardiology Grand Rounds

December 1: The Pathophysiology and Natural History of Perioperative Atrial Fibrillation: Transient Nuisance or Cause for Concern with Bernard Gersh of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. 5 p.m. Webex.   

December 7: Visiting lecture with Anubha Agarwal of Northwestern Medicine.

 

Training Workshop

November 30 & December 14: Stepping in 4-Respect (SI4R) Workshop for Duke Division of Cardiology. 5-7 p.m. Zoom (Details in email from Kim Dorman)

As part of the Department of Medicine Civility Champion initiatives, a 2-hr zoom workshop for all faculty, staff, and trainees throughout all DOM divisions has been developed. Civility Champions are trained faculty, fellows, and chief residents who provide informal support in response to incidents of bias, harassment, or other unprofessional behaviors, and to help those affected understand their options for intervention and reporting. People generally come to Civility Champions after the fact, and the Champions debrief their experiences every quarter.

The workshop that Drs. John Duronville, Jane Gagliardi, Anita Kelsey, Camille Frazier-Mills, Daniella Zipkin, Laura Previll, and Sophia Weinmann will be presenting to the Cardiology clinical faculty is entitled Stepping In 4-Respect. It is being offered twice and is a new component of these civility efforts designed to teach faculty the skills needed to step in (be an “upstander”) in the moment, with a particular focus on race-, ethnicity- and gender-based incidents. This workshop is supported by Dr. Kathleen Cooney, Chair of the DOM, and will be provided to each division’s faculty over the coming months.

Please be sure to attend the workshop on one of these dates (November 30th or December 14th). Additional details about registration, the structure and goals of the workshop appeared in the email invitation.

 

Save the Date & Support the Marfan Foundation

February 11: An Evening with Heart to benefit The Marfan Foundation. 7-10 p.m. at The Maxwell in Raleigh, NC. A Valentine’s Day weekend event with silent auction, cocktails, heavy hors d’oeuvres and entertainment. Cocktail attire. Tickets required. For information, visit: https://bit.ly/3cHIBYD.

The Duke Center for Aortic Disease, led by cardiovascular surgeon Chad Hughes, works closely with Marfan patients, their family members and the Marfan Foundation. We are the only location in NC offering access to comprehensive aortic surgical interventions as well as coordinated cardiovascular care and genetic counseling for patients with Marfan syndrome and other connective tissue disorders such as Loeys-Dietz. If you’re interested in learning more about the work being done at Duke or would like to partner or otherwise get involved, please contact Dr. Hughes or Melissa Merrill Burkett, ACNP.

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged. Submissions by Noon, Wednesdays, to be considered for weekend inclusion.

Duke Heart in the News:

November 19 — Stephen Greene

Medscape

Fewer Strokes on Myosin Activator in Reduced-EF Heart Failure: GALACTIC-HF

https://duke.is/c4e9x

November 19 — Manesh Patel

U.S. News & World Report

Advances in Care, Impact of COVID Highlights of Latest Cardiologists’ Meeting

https://duke.is/8ezmf

November 20 — Manesh Patel

UPI

Pandemic has made heart healthcare more difficult, doctors say at meeting

https://duke.is/w8bz6

November 23 — Sreekanth Vemulapalli

tctMD

US Aortic Valve Trends in Older Patients Hint at Better Outcomes, Access

https://duke.is/ykbht

 

Duke Heart Pulse – week ending 11-21-2021

Highlights of the week:

AHA Scientific Sessions & Watch Party

A big congratulations to all members of our team who showcased the outstanding cardiovascular research and clinical care taking place at Duke during the 2021 AHA Scientific Sessions – in an extraordinarily challenging year, we still had a tremendous showing of speakers, moderators, panelists, discussants and collaborators from across Duke Heart and Duke Clinical Research Institute. Congratulations to Karen Alexander, Renato Lopes, Marat Fudim, Sean Pokorney, Neha Pagidipati, Svati Shah, Adrian Hernandez, Magnus Ohman, Schuyler Jones, L.Kristin Newby, Patricia  Cowper, Gerald Bloomfield, Monique Starks, Jennifer Rymer, Stephen Greene, Kevin Thomas, Sana Al-Khatib, Dan Mark, Pamela Douglas, Jonathan Piccini, Adam DeVore, Robert Mentz, Manesh Patel, Michael Felker, Chris Granger, Jim Daubert, Sunil Rao, Vishal Rao, Michelle Kelsey, Josephine Harrington and Vanessa Blumer and to all of our amazing staff members who support their research, time and efforts.

A full listing of all presentations by members of the DCRI, including On-Demand Content can be found here: https://duke.is/2s2f8; media coverage appears in our News Section, below.

A big hat tip to Chris and Bradi Granger for hosting an AHA Watch Party at their lovely home in Bahama last weekend – it was a fun event held in lieu of the annual AHA Duke Reception to celebrate Duke Heart’s presence at the AHA. The Watch Party included some serious and not-so-serious awards, including “Most Likely to Succeed (as next FDA Commissioner)” which went to Rob Califf.

Other superlatives included:

  • Best Stats awarded to Hillary Mulder and Karen Pieper of the DCRI
  • Best BP Cuff Distribution awarded to Holly Biola of the AHA-Duke-PACE Team
  • Best Dissemination Award given to the ICU iPad Patient-Family Communication Study
  • The Heart Success Champion “Big Gold Belt” Award, given to the Heart Failure team member involved in research that has led to significant improvement in the care of HF patients, went to Steve Green for his presentation of CHAMP-HF. Green is a collaborator or partner on 14 total presentations or posters and, according to his colleagues, “will hunt you down if you fail to prescribe GDMT.”
  • The Rising Star Award, given to a trainee who consistently demonstrates commitment to growth, education and involvement with the AHA, was presented to Vanessa Blumer, a finalist for and winner of the 2021 AHA Laennec Award.
  • The Bench to Bedside Award, given to an individual who leads the way in basic science research went to Lauren Truby for her work with Svati Shah and others surrounding proteomic profiling to identify pre-transplant biomarkers of renal failure after heart transplantation which was accepted and presented as a rapid fire oral abstract.
  • The Master Collaborator Award was awarded to Marat Fudim for his 13 collaborations across the globe during AHA Scientific Sessions ranging in topics from global health to big data in MIs and stroke care to heart failure disparities. “When in doubt, stop, collaborate and listen.”
  • The Best Site-Based Randomized Study was awarded to UNTAP-IT team for improving understanding of patient discomfort and pain during cath.
  • The 2nd Best Caipirinhas award was presented to Renato Lopes
  • Our newest Heart Center Nurse-APP PIs were recognized: Heather Pena, Dustin Tart, Anna Mall, Kelly Brown, Jules Onorato, Jaime McDermott, Callie Tennyson, Shelley Thompson and Kelly Kester
  • Most Synergistic was awarded to Neha Pagidipati

We hope everyone enjoyed the evening! Congrats to each and every one of you.

Blumer Wins AHA Laennec Award at Scientific Sessions

Vanessa Blumer, MD, was awarded the 2021 Laennec Fellow in Training Clinician Award by the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Clinical Cardiology during the AHA Scientific Sessions held virtually last weekend. The award recognizes the importance of clinical acumen, inductive analytic skills, and teaching ability in future academic cardiologists; it is a highly competitive award category.

Blumer, a third year fellow in our cardiovascular disease fellowship program, presented her abstract, A Challenging Case of Endocarditis — Multi-Disciplinary Approach is an Achievable Chimera during the Laennec FIT Award Competition Session. She is the first finalist from Duke to earn the Laennec award, which has been given since 2010.

“I am extremely honored to have been awarded this year’s AHA Laennec FIT Clinician Award,” said Blumer. “All the finalists did an exceptional job and I learned so much from the experience. Mostly, I am beyond grateful to everyone who helped and supported me.”

Congratulations, Vanessa — this is a tremendous accomplishment and we are so excited for you!

New Cardiology Clinic Space Opens at Arringdon in Morrisville

Our newest cardiology ambulatory space, Duke Cardiology of Arringdon, opened on Monday, Nov. 1. Two Open House events were held in late October in order to showcase the location and orient clinicians and staff to the new space.

Special thanks to Matt Fitzsimmons; Drs. Mike Blazing, Camille Frazier-Mills, Sreekanth Vemulapalli and Anita Kelsey; Annette Moore; Karen Strub; Sarah Moore; Allen Stephens, and Amber Stohl for their exceptional work on planning for the space and helping to executing the move from the Southpoint location. This group led the effort, meeting weekly for more than a year, to ensure that perspectives from all stakeholders within Duke Heart Services were taken into account during the planning phase. In addition, the Division’s staff assistant team led by Mitzi Scarlett and Chris Morgenstern provided additional support with a tremendous volume of appointment rescheduling and helping to ensure our patients were informed.

“This was definitely an all hands on deck operation, said Nick Nguyen, MHA, Duke Heart’s administrator for the Division of Cardiology. “We worked to include multiple viewpoints from across our service line before reaching consensus on operations, layout and design. The team met weekly to consider all aspects of the clinical spaces and operations– working and reworking toward an agreed upon solution.”

Arringdon offers a fresh, bright and spacious location with lots of upgrades, including high-low chairs that convert to exam tables, perimeter work spaces that offer individual sit-stand capability and better ergonomics for the team, as well as ample natural lighting. The clinic, located on the 4th floor, offers a 21 exam room clinic; diagnostic imaging capabilities, including echo, stress tests, and nuclear imaging; and a beautiful, relaxing lobby for patients and their family members that offers both standard and electronic check-in. Everything is larger –including hallways — allowing for easier navigation for patients, especially those who are using mobility aids such as walkers, canes or wheelchairs.

Additional clinical areas at Duke offering services at Arringdon include Duke Eye Center, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Orthopedics and Physical Therapy – making cardiovascular visits even more convenient for our patient population. We anticipate an additional cardiology and EP clinic to open on the 2nd floor of Arringdon in early 2022.

Arringdon Clinic is located at 5601 Arringdon Park Drive, Suite 410 in Morrisville. It is very easy to access off of I-40 (take the Page Road Exit), with free, ample parking and picturesque views of the surrounding area.

WIC Gathering Held

On Thursday evening, Nov. 18, members of our Women in Cardiology (WIC) group were able to gather together for the first time in… far too long. The dinner event, which was hosted by Tracy Wang and sponsored by division chief Manesh Patel, was designed to draw together women from throughout the cardiovascular space at Duke as a means of networking and fostering an important community within Duke Heart.

This will hopefully be one of many such events. Those who joined were able to learn more about each other on a personal and professional level, and to plan future initiatives for Duke WIC. The group recently launched a distribution list to help all WIC members and anyone who is interested in joining the group to stay apprised of future events. If you’d like to be included, please drop a note to: womenincardiology@duke.edu.

The group is grateful to all who took time to help organize and attend the dinner – and they are looking forward to future events as well as welcoming newcomers to the group.

Shown L to R in the group photo are: (Back row) Melissa Daubert, Jenn Rymer, Balim Senman, Manasi Tannu, Karen Flores, Cara Hoke, Ali Corley, Jessica Duran, Pam Douglas, Kelly Arps, Ijeoma Eleazu and Vanessa Blumer. (Front row): Josephine Harrington, Karen Alexander, Tracy Wang, Terry Fortin, Toi Spates, and Kiki Osude. Attendees not shown: our newest cardiology faculty member, Brandy Patterson; heart surgeon, Brittany Zwishenberger and electrophysiologist, Camille Frazier-Mills.

 

Mentz, Lala Interview Lady & Dr. Glaucomflecken for JCF

Rob Mentz, chief of our Heart Failure Section and Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Cardiac Failure (JCF) recently joined with JCF deputy editor Anu Lala, a cardiologist at Mount Sinai, to interview Kristin and Will Flanary to explore their experience as co-patients/co-survivors in patient care. Will, an ophthalmologist, is a cardiac arrest survivor thanks to Kristin’s use of CPR on him a year ago.

The duo, known in the Twitterverse as “Lady and Dr. Glaucomflecken,” have developed a large and loyal social media fan base. The video is well worth watching. Additionally, Kristin Flanary wrote a special piece for JCF describing their experience with cardiac arrest, the care they received and their overall journey to recovery. The Quiet Place can be accessed here: https://duke.is/gaaqz.

Great job, Rob!

Robert Mentz

 

 

 

Cardiac MRI Techs Celebrated During Radiologic Technology Week

Duke Heart leadership took time to recognize our cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) technologists last week during National Radiologic Technology Week (Nov. 7-13) by thanking each of them for their professional accomplishments, contributions, and the excellent care they provide to patients. National Radiologic Technology Week is celebrated annually to recognize the vital work of imaging professionals across the nation; it takes place each year during the week of November 8th to commemorate the discovery of the x-ray by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen on November 8, 1895.

Did you know that Duke’s CMRI program was one of the first such dedicated programs in the world? It’s also one of the largest, performing more than 4,000 clinical procedures per year. In fact, their program volume has grown by more than 18 percent in the past year, despite the pandemic.

CMRI technologists start with basic radiologic training but then work to advance their skills and knowledge by becoming specialized in cardiac imaging — gaining a focused understanding of cardiac anatomy, cardiac rhythms, and cardiac disease processes, mastering cardiac terminology, and utilizing MRI technology for all diagnosis and treatment plans.

Duke clinical and research faculty have developed several advances in the field of CMRI, including the development of the Delayed Enhancement technique, which was done with scientists at Siemens. According to the team, this is arguably the single most important advance to propel cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) into widespread clinical use. Delayed Enhancement CMR detects injury to the heart and, importantly, can differentiate irreversible damage from damage that may recover with appropriate treatment – offering essential guidance for clinical decisions.

We hope that all members of our CMRI team paused to reflect on and celebrate their personal and team successes during Radiologic Technology Week. We thank you for everything you have done and continue to do for cardiovascular patients at Duke Health.

Shown here are members of the CMRI technologist team during one of their recent celebrations. L to R: Jeanne Dement, Stephen Darty, George Gamondea, Vera Kimbrell, Rafael Rojas, Ryan Seward.  Not pictured is technologist Nestor Mena. We think you’re awesome – thank you for all you do!

 

Thanksgiving Wishes to All

Finally, as we close out a busy AHA week and look to the end of the month, we want to wish all of our Pulse readers a very peaceful, safe and happy Thanksgiving holiday. Thank you for all that you have done this year.

We are incredibly grateful for the talented faculty and staff throughout Duke Heart who have showed up 110 percent throughout a rough year. Our fellows have gone above and beyond during the pandemic and with the expansion of our CCU; our APPs have done an incredible job of enhancing continuity of care over the past year, despite the many challenges confronting healthcare. We have so many reasons to feel grateful — your presence, your effort, your collective spirit matters.

Duke Heart is a place unlike any other — thank you for being a part of our team. Please take time to recognize the wonderful people around you this holiday season.

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

Cardiology Grand Rounds

December 1: The Pathophysiology and Natural History of Perioperative Atrial Fibrillation: Transient Nuisance or Cause for Concern with Bernard Gersh of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. 5 p.m. Webex.   

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged.

Duke Heart in the News:

November 12 — Manesh Patel

Practical Cardiology

AHA 2021 Scientific Sessions Preview with Manesh Patel, MD

https://duke.is/cze92

November 13 — Manesh Patel

Medscape

Village Health Workers Successfully Treat Hypertension in Rural China

https://duke.is/wsb5y

November 13 — Manesh Patel

tctMD

RAPID CABG: No Penalty to Early Surgery for ACS After Stopping Ticagrelor

https://duke.is/j8pr6

November 13 — Manesh Patel

Healio/Cardiology

‘Feasible’ doctor-led strategy improved blood pressure control in rural China

https://duke.is/8cfwg

November 14 — Sana Al-Khatib

Healio/Cardiology

No increase in atrial arrhythmias, more activity, less sleep with coffee consumption

https://duke.is/ru2e4

November 14 — Geoffrey Ginsburg

WRAL (NBC – Raleigh)

NIH taps Duke researcher for key role

https://duke.is/53atw

November 14 — Sana Al-Khatib

tctMD

Small CRAVE Trial Reassures on Caffeine Safety in Rhythm Disorders

https://duke.is/6ccjn

November 14 — Jonathan Piccini

Healio/Cardiology

No effect of trigger testing on AF-related quality of life, but fewer events

https://duke.is/pre28

November 14 — Sana Al-Khatib

tctMD

Fitbit Joins the AF Hunt, but Effect on Treatment, Outcomes Unknown

https://duke.is/4dfhc

November 14 — Jacob Schroder

The Philadelphia Inquirer

A Big Heart

https://duke.is/6pedr

November 14 — Sana Al-Khatib

Medscape

Fitbit Algorithm Successfully Detects AF

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/962910#vp_1

November 14 — Sana Al-Khatib

tctMD

Empagliflozin Safe in Acute HF, Improves ‘Clinical Benefit’ Over Time: EMPULSE

https://duke.is/9t5sg

November 14 — Sana Al-Khatib

Medscape

CRAVE: No Spike in Atrial Arrhythmias Among Coffee Drinkers

https://duke.is/2gzpj

November 14 — Jonathan Piccini

Healio/Cardiology

Cognitive outcomes similar at 2 years with dabigatran vs warfarin in older adults with AF

https://duke.is/g52yp

November 14 — Sana Al-Khatib

Medpage Today

Coffee Causes This One Arrhythmia, Trial Shows

https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/aha/95644

November 15 — Tracy Wang

Medscape

Oral Factor XIa Inhibitor Cuts Post-Op VTE Risk: AXIOMATIC-TKR

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/963000#vp_1

November 15 — Manesh Patel

Medscape

High-Dose Fish Oil: “Intriguing” Results in COVID-19

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/962972

November 15 — Sana Al-Khatib

HealthDay

Your Morning Cup of Coffee Can Affect Your Heart’s Rhythms

https://duke.is/vqbkr

November 16 — Tracy Wang

Physician’s Weekly

AHA: Novel Oral Factor XIa Inhibitor Demonstrates Prevents VTE in Knee Arthroplasty

https://duke.is/7n339

November 16 — Tracy Wang

Medpage Today

Oral Factor XIa Inhibitor Sets the Stage for a Safer Anticoagulant

https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/aha/95710

November 16 — Manesh Patel

Medscape

No Benefit of Antiplatelets in Noncritical COVID: ACTIV-4a

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/963093

November 16 — Sana Al-Khatib

Medpage Today

Hospitalized Acute HF Patients See Clinical Benefits With Empagliflozin

https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/aha/95694

November 17 — Sunil Rao

Medscape

Left-Main PCI, CABG Mortality Similar; Choice Remains Complex

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/963198

November 19 — Manesh Patel

MSN.com

Advances in Care, Impact of COVID Highlights of Latest Cardiologists’ Meeting

https://duke.is/mjpgc

 

Duke Heart Center Pulse Week ending 11-14-2021

Chief’s message:

AHA21: This weekend we had the AHA meeting 2021 where we had several of our faculty and fellows presenting.  Given the great science and immediate impact on clinical care – we will have updates in the upcoming weeks.  Want to personally congratulate and thank all the faculty and fellows presenting at this years scientific sessions.

Highlights of the week:

Thomas named Vice Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for Duke SOM

Kevin Thomas

Kevin Thomas, MD, associate professor of medicine in cardiology and an electrophysiologist in the Division of Cardiology at Duke, has been named Duke University School of Medicine’s first Vice Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Dr. Thomas currently serves as Assistant Dean for Underrepresented Faculty Development for the School of Medicine and as Director of Faculty Diversity and Health Disparities Research for Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI).

As Vice Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Dr. Thomas will lead the School’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion and will serve as a key advisor and partner to the Dean to advance the School’s goal of cultivating an inclusive, welcoming, respectful and supportive working and learning environment. Dr. Thomas and his team will collaborate with staff, faculty and students across the school to implement the School’s Moments to Movement Strategic Plan to Dismantle Racism and Advance Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and to develop and implement a broad range of policies and programs rooted in equity that foster a greater sense of belonging, engagement, and achievement amongst all members of the School of Medicine and larger Duke Health community.

Dr. Thomas has developed and led a number of programs at Duke that facilitate academic achievement and promotion of Underrepresented Racial and Ethnic Faculty in the School of Medicine, including the School’s Academic Development, Advocacy, Networking Coaching, and Education in Underrepresented Populations (ADVANCE-UP) faculty development program. In 2016, he was the inaugural recipient of the School’s Michelle P. Winn Inclusive Excellence Award, which recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to diversity and inclusion.

Dr. Thomas received a BS degree from Emory University, his MD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and was Chief Resident in Medicine at Duke University in 2003-2004. In 2007, he completed fellowships in cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology at Duke and joined the Duke faculty.

The announcement was made by Mary E. Klotman, MD, Dean of the School of Medicine, on November 8. Dr. Thomas’s service in this role is effective immediately.

Congratulations, Kevin – well deserved!

 

Perfusion Team Update

Congratulations to the following members of our Perfusion Team! Andrew (AJ) Jack, CCP, Demetria Middleton, CCP, DeShantra Kelly, CCP, and Heather Keck, CCP have passed both the Perfusion Basic Science Examination (PBSE) and the Clinical Applications in Perfusion Examination (CAPE).  They are now designated by the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion as Certified Clinical Perfusionists (CCP).  We are so proud of them – this accomplishment is the culmination of many years of hard work and sacrifice.

Kudos also to the Pediatric Perfusion Team. They have successfully rolled out new state of the art technology in cardiopulmonary bypass this week. New Quantum pediatric heart-lung machines with Viper technology made by Spectrum Medical came online this past week – they are equipped with enhanced digitization, safety monitoring and best practice alerts. Spectrum customized the software with our Duke team to fit our specific needs and goals. This software enables the Duke team to continue to customize and design best practices alerts to optimize the care of our patients.

After many, many months of design, coordination, and simulation the team successfully pumped their first case with these heart lung machines on Wednesday, November 10th — a neonatal arterial switch operation.

Pictured here some of the members of the pediatric perfusion team: Amy Evans, Rachel Gambino, Felicia Shugars, Greg Smigla, and Travis Siffring.

Great work, everyone!!!

Shout-out to Hernandez

A shout-out to Adrian Hernandez who volunteered his entire Sunday last weekend (November 7) to help give COVID vaccines to kids at Durham Academy and throughout the broader Durham community.

Our hat tip comes from Jenn Rymer: “I got my son vaccinated and was so thankful to do so, and saw a lot of other Duke parents getting their kids vaccinated. I really appreciated people like Adrian being there to hopefully get our world back to a normal place!”

Nicely done, Adrian!

ICYMI: Code Blue & Duke’s Chaplain Service

A new peer-reviewed journal article is out in the American Journal of Critical Care: “A Descriptive Study of Chaplains’ Code Blue Responses” (https://doi.org/10.4037/ajcc2021854) by co-authors Callie Tennyson, John Oliver (chaplain services) and Karen Joost (pediatrics, palliative care), all of Duke. Background: Family presence during resuscitation is the compassionate practice of allowing a patient’s family to witness treatment for cardiac or respiratory arrest (code blue event) when appropriate. Offering family presence during resuscitation as an interprofessional practice is consistent with patient- and family-centered care. In many institutions, the role of family facilitator is not formalized and may be performed by various staff members. At the large academic institution of this study, the family facilitator is a member of the chaplain staff.

Congrats, Callie, John and Karen!

Duke Heart Family Halloween Fun

Many thanks to Jamie Jollis for collecting some really adorable photos of our Duke Heart team family members to share with Pulse. We hope everyone had an enjoyable Halloween!

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

Cardiology Grand Rounds

We will not hold Cardiology Grand Rounds this week.  

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged.

Duke Heart in the News:

November 5 — Edward Chen

tctMD

TAVI Edges Out Surgery in 2-Year Costs for Low-risk Patients: PARTNER 3

https://bit.ly/3qBHWjE

November 5 — Jennifer Rymer

Medpage Today

Surgical Scores Shine for Prognostication in No-Option PCI — Surgeons, Not So Much

https://bit.ly/3c6YyaB

November 8 — Manesh Patel

tctMD

AHA 2021 Tackles AF Triggers, Watchful Waiting in AS, Data Overload, and More

https://bit.ly/3FfpjX1

November 8 — Manesh Patel

Medscape

AHA 2021 Puts Scientific Dialogue, Health Equity Center Stage

https://wb.md/31WtKYm

November 9 — Geoffrey Ginsburg

Triangle Business Journal

Duke professor leaving to join NIH for ‘once in a lifetime opportunity’

https://bit.ly/3wIdxRR

November 9 — Mitchell Krucoff

tctMD

Cardiogenic Shock: SCAI Categories Get a Rethink as Research Rolls On

https://bit.ly/3n9YtJD

November 9 — Jennifer Rymer

MDEdge

At 5 years, iFR found as effective and safe as FFR for guiding PCI intervention

https://bit.ly/30pwtsS

November 10 — Pamela Douglas

Radiology Today

Heart CT Shows Slight Benefit Over Stress Tests

https://bit.ly/3HhxcwR

November 10 — Pamela Douglas

tctMD

Debating ISCHEMIA: Do the Results Apply to CABG, Too?

https://bit.ly/3CfQ3V7

November 12 — Robert Califf

Associate Press*

Biden picks ex-FDA chief Robert Califf to again lead agency

https://bit.ly/3FcAG1W

*story appears in dozens of news outlets across the U.S.

November 12 — Robert Califf

Politico

Biden nominates Califf as FDA chief

https://politi.co/3FizFoK

Division of Cardiology Publications Indexed in PubMed November 4-10, 2021

Berntorp K, Persson J, Koul SM, Patel MR, Christiansen EH, Gudmundsdottir I, Yndigegn T, Omerovic E, Erlinge D, Fröbert O, Götberg M. Instantaneous wave-free ratio compared with fractional flow reserve in PCI: A cost-minimization analysis. Int J Cardiol 2021;344:54-59. PM: 34600977.

Blumenthal JA, Smith PJ, Jiang W, Hinderliter A, Watkins LL, Hoffman BM, Kraus WE, Liao L, Davidson J, Sherwood A. Effect of Exercise, Escitalopram, or Placebo on Anxiety in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease: The Understanding the Benefits of Exercise and Escitalopram in Anxious Patients With Coronary Heart Disease (UNWIND) Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Psychiatry 2021;78(11):1270-1278. PM: 34406354.

Chouairi F, Miller PE, Guha A, Clarke JR, Reinhardt SW, Ahmad T, Freeman JV, Desai NR, Friedman DJ. Cannabis use disorder among atrial fibrillation admissions, 2008-2018. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2021;44(11):1934-1938. PM: 34506639.

Darden D, Duong T, Du C, Munir MB, Han FT, Reeves R, Saw J, Zeitler EP, Al-Khatib SM, Russo AM, Minges KE, Curtis JP, Freeman JV, Hsu JC. Sex Differences in Procedural Outcomes Among Patients Undergoing Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion: Insights From the NCDR LAAO Registry. JAMA Cardiol 2021;6(11):1275-1284. PM: 34379072.

Dupre ME, Farmer HR, Xu H, Navar AM, Nanna MG, George LK, Peterson ED. The Cumulative Impact of Chronic Stressors on Risks of Myocardial Infarction in US Older Adults. Psychosom Med 2021;83(9):987-994. PM: 34297011.

Feng KY, O’Connor CM, Clare R, Alhanti B, Piña IL, Kraus WE, Whellan DJ, Mentz RJ. Greater Pain Severity Is Associated with Worse Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure. J Cardiovasc Transl Res 2021;14(5):984-991. PM: 33564986.

Grubb AF, Greene SJ, Fudim M, Dewald T, Mentz RJ. Drugs of Abuse and Heart Failure. J Card Fail 2021;27(11):1260-1275. PM: 34133967.

Hein AM, Scialla JJ, Sun JL, Greene SJ, Shaw LK, Chiswell K, Pun PH, Mentz RJ. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate Variability in Patients With Heart Failure and Chronic Kidney Disease. J Card Fail 2021;27(11):1175-1184. PM: 33971291.

Klem I, Cavalier JS. Vasodilator Stress Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Prior Myocardial Infarction. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2021;14(11):2152-2154. PM: 34147445.

Kumar N, Xu H, Garg N, Pandey A, Matsouaka RA, Field ME, Turakhia MP, Piccini JP, Lewis WR, Fonarow GC. Patient characteristics, care patterns, and outcomes of atrial fibrillation associated hospitalizations in patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Am Heart J 2021;242:45-60. PM: 34216572.

Lala A, Mentz RJ. Following Our Hearts: Prioritizing Self-care and Wellness. J Card Fail 2021;27(11):1163-1164. PM: 34749927.

Naidu SS, Baron SJ, Eng MH, Sathanandam SK, Zidar DA, Feldman DN, Ing FF, Latif F, Lim MJ, Henry TD, Rao SV, Dangas GD, Hermiller JB, Daggubati R, Shah B, Ang L, Aronow HD, Banerjee S, Box LC, Caputo RP, Cohen MG, Coylewright M, Duffy PL, Goldsweig AM, et al.  Hot topics in interventional cardiology: Proceedings from the society for cardiovascular angiography and interventions (SCAI) 2021 think tank. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2021;98(5):904-913. PM: 34398509.

Nathan SD, Waxman A, Rajagopal S, Case A, Johri S, DuBrock H, De La Zerda DJ, Sahay S, King C, Melendres-Groves L, Smith P, Shen E, Edwards LD, Nelsen A, Tapson VF. Inhaled treprostinil and forced vital capacity in patients with interstitial lung disease and associated pulmonary hypertension: a post-hoc analysis of the INCREASE study. Lancet Respir Med 2021;9(11):1266-1274. PM: 34214475.

Ramacciotti E, Agati LB, Calderaro D, Volpiani GG, de Oliveira CCC, Aguiar VCR, Rodrigues E, Sobreira ML, Joviliano EE, Dusilek C, Itinose K, Dedivitis RA, Cortina AS, Sanches SMV, de Moraes NF, Tierno PFGMM, de Oliveira ALML, Tachibana A, Chate RC, et al. Medically Ill hospitalized Patients for COVID-19 THrombosis Extended ProphyLaxis with rivaroxaban ThErapy: Rationale and Design of the MICHELLE Trial. Am Heart J 2021;242:115-122. PM: 34480880.

Samsky MD, Morrow DA, Proudfoot AG, Hochman JS, Thiele H, Rao SV. Cardiogenic Shock After Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Review. JAMA 2021;326(18):1840-1850. PM: 34751704.

Shi H, Ossip DJ, Mayo NL, Lopez DA, Block RC, Post WS, Bertoni AG, Ding J, Chen S, Yan C, Xie Z, Hoeschele I, Liu Y, Li D. Role of DNA methylation on the association between physical activity and cardiovascular diseases: results from the longitudinal multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort. BMC Genomics 2021;22(1):790. PM: 34732130.

Sofer T, Kurniansyah N, Aguet F, Ardlie K, Durda P, Nickerson DA, Smith JD, Liu Y, Gharib SA, Redline S, Rich SS, Rotter JI, Taylor KD. Benchmarking association analyses of continuous exposures with RNA-seq in observational studies. Brief Bioinform 2021;22(6):bbab194. PM: 34015820.

Sun D, Richard M, Musani SK, Sung YJ, Winkler TW, Schwander K, Chai JF, Guo X, Kilpeläinen TO, Vojinovic D, Aschard H, Bartz TM, Bielak LF, Brown MR, Chitrala K, Hartwig FP, Horimoto ARVR, Liu Y, Manning AK, Noordam R, Smith AV, Harris SE, Kühnel B, et al. Multi-Ancestry Genome-wide Association Study Accounting for Gene-Psychosocial Factor Interactions Identifies Novel Loci for Blood Pressure Traits. HGG Adv 2021;2(1):100013. PM: 34734193.

Taron J, Foldyna B, Mayrhofer T, Osborne MT, Meyersohn N, Bittner DO, Puchner SB, Emami H, Lu MT, Ferencik M, Pagidipati NJ, Douglas PS, Hoffmann U. Risk Stratification With the Use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography in Patients With Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease. JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2021;14(11):2186-2195. PM: 33865792.

Vemulapalli S, Stebbins A, Jones WS, Gutierrez JA, Patel MR, Dolor RJ, Pellikka PA, Alhanti B, Hoffmann U, Douglas PS. Cardiovascular risk and outcomes in symptomatic patients with suspected coronary artery disease and non coronary vascular disease: A report from the PROMISE trial. Am Heart J 2021;242:82-91. PM: 34384742.

Weissler EH, Ford CB, Patel MR, Goodney P, Clark A, Long C, Jones WS. Younger patients with chronic limb threatening ischemia face more frequent amputations. Am Heart J 2021;242:6-14. PM: 34371002.

Westerterp KR, Yamada Y, Sagayama H, Ainslie PN, Andersen LF, Anderson LJ, Arab L, Baddou I, Bedu-Addo K, Blaak EE, Blanc S, Bonomi AG, Bouten CVC, Bovet P, Buchowski MS, Butte NF, Camps SGJA, Close GL, Cooper JA, Das SK, Cooper R, Dugas LR, Ekelund U, et al. Physical activity and fat-free mass during growth and in later life. Am J Clin Nutr 2021;114(5):1583-1589. PM: 34477824.

 

 

Duke Heart Week ending November 7th 2021

Highlights of the week:

Ginsburg named Chief Medical & Scientific Officer, NIH All of Us Research Program

Geoffrey S. Ginsburg, MD, PhD, a professor of medicine in cardiology, a professor in pathology, biostatistics and bioinformatics, a professor of biomedical engineering, and a professor in Duke’s School of Nursing, will leave Duke to assume the role of Chief Medical and Scientific Officer for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) All of Us Research Program, effective January 2022. Dual announcements were made on Nov. 3 by the NIH and Duke School of Medicine.

In his new role, Ginsburg will have the opportunity to build out the research agenda for All of Us and to engage research scientists across all 27 institutes of the NIH as well as the research community across the U.S. and internationally.

“As I reflect on what I’ve been doing across most of my career both at Millennium Pharmaceuticals in the late 1990s and early 2000s and then at Duke for the last 17 years, this opportunity with All of Us is the capstone for everything I’ve been thinking about,” says Ginsburg. “In the U.S., this platform is second to none in terms of the ability to carry out the research agenda for precision medicine. It encompasses an amazing set of resources that has the potential to really change how we practice medicine, how we do research, and it brings to fruition my particular focus on individualized care, health, and population health.”

Originally announced as the Precision Medicine Initiative cohort program in 2015 by former U.S. President Barack Obama, the name was later changed to the All of Us Research Program, which aims to gather data from at least one million diverse people aged 18 and up who reside in the U.S. as a means of accelerating biomedical research and improving health. The data repository is expected to permit researchers to “take into account individual differences in lifestyle, socioeconomic factors, environment, and biologic characteristics in order to advance precision diagnosis, prevention, and treatment,” according to a 2019 special report in the New England Journal of Medicine.

All of Us is enrolling participants from a network of more than 340 recruitments sites. According to the All of Us research website more than 429,000 participants have joined the program and more than 329,000 have contributed biospecimens to the repository, with more than 80 percent of those participants hailing from groups that have been historically underrepresented in biomedical research. The first 80,000 whole genome sequences will be released by the end of the year.

“A visionary leader in genomics and precision medicine, Dr. Ginsburg has been instrumental in Duke’s work to advance this still emerging field of science, foster important collaborations, and improve human health,” said Mary E. Klotman, MD, Dean, Duke University School of Medicine.

Indeed, Ginsburg has been a transformative leader for Duke University and the School of Medicine for 17 years. He is the founding director of the Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine (CAGPM) and also founding director of MEDx, a partnership between Duke’s Schools of Medicine and Engineering, which is designed to stimulate collaboration and innovation. During his tenure at Duke, Ginsburg has pioneered translational genomics, the development of novel diagnostics, and precision medicine. With a strong commitment to interdisciplinary science and innovation, he has led projects to develop predictive models for common complex diseases using high dimensional genomic data and developed partnerships with engineering colleagues to develop novel point of care sensors.

“Dr. Ginsburg’s achievements at Duke are numerous, and they all center around genetic science and entrepreneurship fueled by innovation and collaboration,” says Kathleen Cooney, MD, chair, Duke Department of Medicine. “Geoff has made an enormous difference here as founder of both the Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine and MEDx. His ability to identify and build partnerships across the Duke enterprise with the Pratt School of Engineering, Duke Heart, and many, many others has been a driving force behind our leadership in precision medicine.”

An internationally recognized expert in genomics and personalized medicine, Ginsburg has authored or co-authored more than 300 peer-reviewed publications. His research has been supported by the NIH, the Department of Defense, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Gates Foundation, and others. Throughout his career, he has demonstrated a strong commitment to interdisciplinary science and innovation, with work spanning oncology, infectious diseases, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders. He is a founding co-chair of the International HundredK+ Cohorts Consortium, and founder and president of the Global Genomic Medicine Collaborative (G2MC), a not-for-profit organization aimed at creating international partnerships to advance the implementation of precision medicine.

Ginsburg has served on a number of advisory councils for the NIH including the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s (NHLBI) Board of External Experts (2007-2016), the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research (2009-2011), the External Advisory Committee of the Pharmacogenomics Research Network (2010-2013), the National Center to Accelerate Translational Science (NCATS) Advisory Council (2012-2017), the NHLBI External Advisory Board for Precision Medicine Initiative (2015-2016), and most recently on the Advisory Committee to the Director of the NIH (2016-2020), and the Genomic Medicine Working Group for the National Human Genome Research Institute (2011 to present). He has held leadership roles as the Chair of the NIH CTSA Translational Steering Committee and as Vice Chair of the Cures Acceleration Network Advisory Board.

Ginsburg will step down from both of his directorship roles at Duke in late December. He will remain on faculty at Duke as an adjunct professor in the School of Medicine. The Center for Applied Genomics will continue to grow and succeed at Duke thanks to the team Ginsburg has grown over the years. Dr. Cooney will serve as interim center director to ensure a smooth and orderly transition once a new director is named. Dean Klotman, Provost Sally Kornbluth, and Jerome Lynch, who was recently named dean of Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering, will work together to plan the future direction of MEDx.

We are so excited for Geoff and this incredible career opportunity for him at the NIH! He has done an outstanding job at Duke and he will be deeply missed. Please join us in congratulating him on this exciting next step in his accomplished career!

 

Celebrating Nurse Practitioner Week 2021

It’s Nurse Practitioner (NP) Week, November 7-13. Please join us in helping to celebrate our many nurse practitioners throughout Duke Heart and Duke Health. They are a vital part of all Duke care teams and an invaluable resource to our patients and their loved ones.

NP Week recognizes the contributions NPs make to the health of patients nationwide. These health care professionals practice in clinics, hospitals, emergency rooms, urgent care centers, nursing homes and private practices across the country — wherever patients are in need. They’ve done an exceptional job in all areas of Duke Heart throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

Did you know there are more than 325,000 NPs licensed in the U.S.? According to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, 81 percent of full time NPs see Medicare patients and 78.7 percent see Medicaid patients; 42.5 percent hold hospital privileges. NPs assess patients, order and interpret tests, make diagnoses and provide treatment, including prescribing medications. As clinicians who blend clinical expertise with an added emphasis on disease prevention and health management, NPs are critical members of health care teams across the U.S.

Please join us in thanking and celebrating our Duke Heart Nurse Practitioners!

 

Positive Top Line Results from U.S. Randomized OCS DCD Heart Trial Announced

TransMedics Group, Inc., announced this week positive topline results from its OCS Donation After Circulatory death (DCD) Heart Trial, which was designed as the first and only randomized trial to compare post-transplant clinical outcomes between hearts transplanted from DCD donors that were resuscitated and assessed on their OCS Heart System and standard criteria donation after brain death (DBD) heart transplants that were preserved using cold storage in the U.S.

The primary goal of the study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of OCS Heart technology to expand the heart donor pool with hearts from DCD donors. Heart transplant candidates were randomized 3:1 into two groups: DCD Heart Possible (DCD) or DBD cold stored hearts (Control). The trial protocol compared the post-transplant outcomes from recipients of DCD hearts preserved on OCS (DCD) to all those who received standard criteria DBD hearts preserved with cold storage (DBD Control).

The OCS DCD Heart trial achieved its primary clinical objectives by meeting the primary

effectiveness endpoint of 6 month patient survival post-transplant which was 95 percent for OCS DCD arm vs. 89 percent for the Control cold storage DBD arm. Even when the outcomes were adjusted for all risk factors between the two groups the results were 94 percent for OCS and 90 percent for Control (non-inferiority p<0.0001), according to the statement released by TransMedics on Nov. 3.

Of 101 DCD donor hearts that were perfused and assessed on OCS Heart technology, 90 were successfully transplanted resulting in a utilization rate of 89 percent. Long-term follow-up is ongoing and the final results are expected to be presented at the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantion 42nd annual meeting and scientific sessions in April 2022 in Boston.

The OCS Heart System was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its

DBD heart indication in September 2021. According to TransMedics, the DCD trial results will be submitted shortly to the FDA in a premarket approval supplement to support the approval for the OCS DCD heart indication.

Jacob Schroder

“The OCS DCD Heart Trial provides objective randomized evidence showing high utilization and

excellent short-term clinical outcomes using hearts that historically were never considered for

transplants in the U.S.,” said Jacob Schroder, MD, surgical director of heart transplantation at

Duke University Health System and the principal investigator for the OCS DCD Heart Trial. “The

more widespread use of DCD hearts for transplantation is the biggest thing to happen since the

beginning of heart transplantation.”

Duke was the first U.S. site to enroll a patient into the TransMedics OCS DCD Heart Trial. Schroder led a Duke Heart transplant team in the first DCD heart transplant in the U.S. on Dec. 2, 2019 at Duke University Hospital. Duke was the lead enroller in the trial.

Al-Khatib, Daubert Listed as Top Scholars, Sudden Cardiac Death

Sana Al-Khatib and Jim Daubert, electrophysiologists with Duke Heart, have been listed by Expertscape in

James Daubert

the top 1 percent of sudden cardiac death experts contributing peer-reviewed journal articles to the scientific literature over the past 10 years. Al-Khatib is ranked as the top contributor, globally.

Expertscape is an online tool geared toward consumers seeking information regarding the most knowledgeable experts in various biomedical research fields. According to their website, Expertscape bases its rankings by mining available scientific publications via online search engines such as PubMed.

Congrats, Sana and Jim!

 

13th Annual Pulmonary Hypertension Symposium Held

The 13th Annual North Carolina Research Triangle Pulmonary Hypertension Symposium was held on Friday, Nov. 5. Course directors H. James Ford of UNC School of Medicine and Duke Heart’s Terry Fortin pulled together a terrific program for more than 240 attendees. In addition to Fortin, Duke presenters included Kishan Parikh, Sudarshan Rajagopal and Jordan Whitson. The event was held online and presented by Duke Health and UNC School of Medicine.

Katz Opens NYU Critical Care Cardiology Symposium

Jason Katz served as a co-course director of the first NYU Langone Critical Care Cardiology Symposium held virtually on Friday, Nov. 5. He kicked off session 1 of the symposium with his presentation, Why Do We Need This Conference? A Journey Through the Evolution of Critical Care Cardiology. The symposium, more than seven years in the making, was a resounding success with more than 850 registrants from over 28 countries. Katz not only helped plan the event, he also served as a moderator for several sessions and pledged to cover costs for any Duke cardiology fellow wishing to attend. Katz’s fellow co-course directors included Carlos L. Alviar, Samuel Bernard, James Horowitz and Eugene Yuriditsky, all of the NYU Grossman School of Medicine, and Christopher Barnett of the University of California, San Francisco.

The NYU Langone Critical Care Cardiology Symposium became the first dedicated Cardiac Critical Care conference to take place in the U.S. Way to go, Jason!

 

Duke Heart at TCT2021

TCT2021, the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics 2021 conference was held Nov. 4-6 as a hybrid event based in Orlando and online. Duke had a strong presence with the following moderators and discussants: Pamela Douglas, Sunil Rao, Jennifer Rymer, Mitch Krucoff, Rob Califf, Sreekanth Vemulapalli, Vishal Rao, Marat Fudim, Christopher Granger and Renato Lopes. Poster presentations included Duke cardiology fellow Zach Wegermann.  Jenn Rymer is quoted in several news stories, be sure to check out our News section, below.

BTW, TCT2021 content is on demand and free for one year. Great job, everyone!

 

Flores Rosario Presents at ACC NC-Chile Case Conference

Karen Flores Rosario, a Duke cardiology 2nd year fellow, was chosen to give an international conference presentation on behalf of the North Carolina chapter of the American College of Cardiology and the Chilean Society of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery (SOCHICAR). The webinar, Clinical Cases from ACC North Carolina and SOCHICAR was held Oct. 25. Flores Rosario presented a brilliant case of lamin cardiomyopathy and did an exceptional job. The discussion was co-moderated by Drs. Adam DeVore and Richard Krasuski.

Well done, Karen!

Upcoming Events & Opportunities

Cardiology Grand Rounds

November 9: Case Conference – Lessons Learned in Peri-Operative LVAD Care with Amanda Coniglio. 5 p.m. Webex.

Request for Nominations: Samuel DuBois Cook Society Awards

The Samuel DuBois Cook Society invites nominations of individuals from every sector of the Duke Community: staff, administrators, and students — undergraduate, graduate or professional.

Founded to be an instrument of social engagement and change, the Cook Society seeks to recognize members of the Duke community who reflect in their work or in their academic pursuits, the objectives to which Dr. Cook dedicated his professional life — social justice, mentoring, the University’s relationship to the black community, and his vision of the “beloved community,” seeking to improve relations among persons of all backgrounds.

Nominations are due November 8, 2021, and winners will be notified in the first week of December.

Awards will be presented during the annual Cook Society Awards Ceremony on February 22, 2022, at the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club.

In evaluating nominees, the committee seeks members of the Duke community who:

  • Actively nurture a sense of community and belonging for Black people.
  • Commit to translate the promise and potential of Black people at Duke into fulfillment and actuality
  • Foster positive and constructive interpersonal and intergroup relations within both Duke University’s and Durham’s Black communities
  • Cultivate positive relations between Black people and other ethnic, racial, and national groups on the basis of an enlightened appreciation and knowledge of our historic interdependence

To learn more/make a nomination please click here.

Request for Nominations: Raymond Gavins Distinguished Faculty Award

The Samuel DuBois Cook Society invites nominations of faculty whose teaching, mentoring, research, publishing, and engagement with faculty, students and staff have helped to improve relations among people of all backgrounds at Duke and beyond.

Nominations are due November 8, 2021, and winners will be notified in the first week of December. Awards will be presented during the annual Cook Society Awards Dinner on February 22, 2022, at the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club.

In evaluating nominees, the committee seeks faculty who:

  • Actively nurture a sense of community and belonging for Black people.
  • Commit to translate the promise and potential of Black people at Duke into fulfillment and actuality
  • Foster positive and constructive interpersonal and intergroup relations within both Duke University’s and Durham’s Black communities
  • Cultivate positive relations between Black people and other ethnic, racial, and national groups on the basis of an enlightened appreciation and knowledge of our historic interdependence

To learn more/make a nomination please click here.

 

Have news to share?

If you have news to share with the Pulse readership, please contact Tracey Koepke, director of communications for Duke Heart at tracey.koepke@duke.edu. We would love to hear about your latest accomplishments, professional news, cool happenings, and any events or opportunities that may be of interest to our Duke Heart family. Please call with any questions: 919-681-2868. Feedback on Pulse is welcome and encouraged.

 

Duke Heart in the News:

October 28 — Duke University Hospital

The Fox Magazine

11 Six Reasons To Relocate To North Carolina: A Useful Guide

https://bit.ly/3nSuXHf

October 29 — Duke University Hospital/Cardiology

Cardiovascular Business

Learning from the best: The world’s top 20 universities for cardiology

https://bit.ly/3BPCDPP

November 1 — Joseph Turek

Science

Skin, nerve transplants from genetically modified pigs could help humans, but organs are a way off

https://bit.ly/3mChFiP

November 2 — Robert Califf and Haider Warraich

STAT

I’ve worked with Robert Califf. He is the leader the FDA needs

https://bit.ly/3CHJHiz

November 4 — Jennifer Rymer

tctMD

Good Early Outcomes With PCI in Complex Patients Unsuited to Surgery: OPTIMUM

https://bit.ly/3D6RHdj

November 4 — Jennifer Rymer

tctMD

OCT Guidance Cuts Stent Use in STEMI Without Plaque Rupture: EROSION III

https://bit.ly/3CVQsNY

Division of Cardiology Publications Indexed in PubMed Oct. 28-Nov. 3, 2021

Breitbart P, Koch A, Schmidt M, Magedanz A, Lindhoff-Last E, Voigtländer T, Schmermund A, Mehta RH, Eggebrecht H. Clinical and cardiac magnetic resonance findings in post-COVID patients referred for suspected myocarditis. Clin Res Cardiol 2021;110(11):1832-1840. PM: 34448040.

Cho SM, Floden D, Wallace K, Hiivala N, Joseph S, Teuteberg J, Rogers JG, Pagani FD, Mokadam N, Tirschwell D, Li S, Starling RC, Mahr C, Uchino K. Long-Term Neurocognitive Outcome in Patients With Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device. JACC Heart Fail 2021;9(11):839-851. PM: 34509403.

Dorling JL, Belsky DW, Racette SB, Das SK, Ravussin E, Redman LM, Höchsmann C, Huffman KM, Kraus WE, Kobor MS, MacIsaac JL, Lin DTS, Corcoran DL, Martin CK. Association between the FTO rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism and dietary adherence during a 2-year caloric restriction intervention: Exploratory analyses from CALERIE™ phase 2. Exp Gerontol 2021;155:111555. PM: 34543722.

Duan KI, Helfrich CD, Rao SV, Neely EL, Sulc CA, Naranjo D, Wong ES. Cost analysis of a coaching intervention to increase use of transradial percutaneous coronary intervention. Implement Sci Commun 2021;2(1):123. PM: 34706775.

Ezekowitz JA, Zheng Y, Cohen-Solal A, Melenovský V, Escobedo J, Butler J, Hernandez AF, Lam CSP, O’Connor CM, Pieske B, Ponikowski P, Voors AA, deFilippi C, Westerhout CM, McMullan C, Roessig L, Armstrong PW. Hemoglobin and Clinical Outcomes in the Vericiguat Global Study in Patients With Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction (VICTORIA). Circulation 2021;144(18):1489-1499. PM: 34432985.

Friedland A, Hernandez AF, Anstrom KJ, Chen-Lim ML, Cohen LW, Currier JS, Forrest CB, Fraser R, Fraulo E, George A, Handberg E, Jackman J, Koellhoffer J, Lawrence D, Leverty R, McAdams P, McCourt B, Mickley B, Naqvi SH, O’Brien EC, Olson R, Prater C, et al.  Design of the Healthcare Worker Exposure Response and Outcomes (HERO) research platform. Contemp Clin Trials 2021;109:106525. PM: 34371163.

Hess CN, Patel MR, Bauersachs RM, Anand SS, Debus ES, Nehler MR, Fanelli F, Yeh RW, Secemsky EA, Beckman JA, Mauri L, Govsyeyev N, Capell WH, Brackin T, Berkowitz SD, Muehlhofer E, Haskell LP, Hiatt WR, Bonaca MP. Safety and Effectiveness of Paclitaxel Drug-Coated Devices in Peripheral Artery Revascularization: Insights From VOYAGER PAD. J Am Coll Cardiol 2021;78(18):1768-1778. PM: 34711335.

Karnam S, Maddala R, Stiber JA, Rao PV. Drebrin, an actin-binding protein, is required for lens morphogenesis and growth. Dev Dyn 2021;250(11):1600-1617. PM: 33896079.

Koontz BF, Levine E, McSherry F, Niedzwiecki D, Sutton L, Dale T, Streicher M, Rushing C, Owen L, Kraus WE, Bennett G, Pollak KI. Increasing physical activity in Cancer Survivors through a Text-messaging Exercise motivation Program (ICanSTEP). Support Care Cancer 2021;29(12):7339-7349. PM: 34050402.

Miller PE, Mullan CW, Chouairi F, Sen S, Clark KA, Reinhardt S, Fuery M, Anwer M, Geirsson A, Formica R, Rogers JG, Desai NR, Ahmad T. Mechanical ventilation at the time of heart transplantation and associations with clinical outcomes. Eur Heart J Acute Cardiovasc Care 2021;10(8):843-851. PM: 34389855.

Noyd DH, Berkman A, Howell C, Power S, Kreissman SG, Landstrom AP, Khouri M, Oeffinger KC, Kibbe WA. Leveraging Clinical Informatics Tools to Extract Cumulative Anthracycline Exposure, Measure Cardiovascular Outcomes, and Assess Guideline Adherence for Children With Cancer. JCO Clin Cancer Inform 2021;5:1062-1075. PM: 34714665.

Ohman EM. The Evolving Post-PCI Antithrombotic Therapies. N Engl J Med 2021;385(18):1712-1714. PM: 34449186.

Oyediran IO, Prattipati S, Sakita FM, Kweka GL, Tarimo TG, Peterson T, Loring Z, Limkakeng AT, Bloomfield GS, Hertz JT. The prevalence, management, and thirty-day outcomes of symptomatic atrial fibrillation in a Tanzanian emergency department. Afr J Emerg Med 2021;11(4):404-409. PM: 34703731.

Shenker RF, Hong JC, Eclov N, Fairchild A, Patel P, Niedzwiecki D, Palta M. Survey of Healthcare Providers Utilization and Perception of Telehealth On-Treatment Visits During COVID-19 Pandemic. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2021;111(3S):S112. PM: 34700417.