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The Impact of Post-IPO Private Equity Ownership on Long-Term Company Performance

By Maria Suhail and Cipriano Echavarría

This thesis contributes to existing knowledge of private equity (PE) by analyzing the
impact of PE ownership post-IPO upon the long-term performance of companies. It considers whether companies perform better when PE funds maintain their ownership stakes post-IPO and whether this performance is also impacted by the degree of ownership that is maintained after IPO. This study uses stock performance (measured by cumulative excess stock returns) as a proxy for long-run company performance. The paper constructs and analyzes a sample of 487 companies that underwent an IPO between 2004 and 2012 to determine the implications of the maintenance and level of PE ownership by analyzing the performance of these companies for six years post-IPO. Results suggest that PE ownership post-IPO positively impacts long-term stock performance of companies. Duration and degree of PE ownership post-IPO are also important determinants of long-run performance likely due to the positive signal that continued PE ownership sends to outside investors about the quality of the company, the information asymmetry that exists between public and private markets and that PE firms are experienced managers that add value to companies.

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Advisors: Professor David Robinson, Professor Michelle Connolly | JEL Codes: G11, G14, G24

Questions?

Undergraduate Program Assistant
Jennifer Becker
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Director of the Honors Program
Michelle P. Connolly
michelle.connolly@duke.edu