Monthly Archives: May 2019

The Expanding Regulatory Perimeter – Crypto-Asset Trading

By | May 30, 2019

Courtesy of Barbara C. Matthews (JD/LLM ’91) “Hi!  I’m from the government.  I’m here to help.” The regulatory perimeter regarding crypto-assets continues to expand.  The latest move comes from the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) which released for comment on 28 May, 2019 suggested regulatory oversight standards[1] to govern crypto-asset trading platforms (the “IOSCO… Read More »

North Carolina’s Proposed Regulatory Sandbox Needs Work

By | May 28, 2019

Last month, a bill was introduced in the North Carolina General Assembly that would make North Carolina the fourth state – after Arizona, Wyoming and Utah – to offer a regulatory sandbox for innovative financial services firms. Broadly defined, a regulatory sandbox is a ‘safe space’ in which businesses can test innovative products or services… Read More »

When Tech Meets Money: the Central-Bank Digital Currency

By | May 22, 2019

Courtesy of Marcelo M. Prates Not long ago, money was simple, central banks were all but invisible, and banks seemed like an inevitable nuisance. Money consisted of the coins and notes carried in wallets, or the checkbook in the desk drawer. Central banks were poorly understood institutions, entrusted with the mystical power to print money.… Read More »

A Typology for Diagnosing and Remedying Regulatory Capture in Financial Regulation

By | May 7, 2019

Courtesy of Justin Rex The study of regulatory capture has a long history across various disciplines. Yet, scholars still disagree on its definition and pervasiveness. This post proposes a typology for organizing literature on regulatory capture under a few key dimensions to help scholars and practitioners better diagnose capture and choose appropriately tailored policy responses.… Read More »

Securities Fraud: Not Just for Policing Financial Markets

By | May 2, 2019

Courtesy of Joseph T. McClure In the wake of the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal, data privacy emerged as a hot-button issue that politicians of all ideological persuasions will add to their stump speeches before the 2020 elections. It also appears likely to join issues such as climate change, gun violence, and workplace sexual misconduct as the… Read More »