29 responses

  1. Ralph Kiszakiewicz
    September 5, 2016

    Soccer is more of a game of anticipation and I appreciate the rules. You have to take in everything about the game from the viewing parties to comimg together the camera angles make it boring sometimes but if you zoom in some of these guys are truly working out there. Its a different type of game that uses regulation format along with round robin in majority of places. In MLS the only difference is playoff and im not sure how it works to qualify in concacaf champions league. I take in everything about the game from goal celebrations to watching athletic players working out there. This game is more for ppl with up beat personalites and that have energy. Americans have gotten more into n soccer they have a chant now..i believe that we will win and i see them getting more into it..also like american football go ny giants! I guess i seen part of my family whos from poland and they are very passonate whenever someone represents them in sports and they have a handful from soccer to volleyball team handball and track and field they alll watch gather have fun and cheer! and make it fun and cool..i can see making the field a little smaller for more tricks but not much…regardless if less goals are scored those players are still working out there. Check out team handball a sport i can see rise in the usa. Respect to all sports and posts here.

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  2. Bounds Cruise
    July 24, 2016

    In the late 19th century baseball became America’s sport not because the game was any better than others, but because it successfully adapted to and represented the cultural changes going on in the country. Coming out of the Civil War and going into the industrial revolution baseball brought together north and south, rural and urban and even black and white (although mostly on a seperate but unequal basis).

    In the early 20th century gridiron football slowly grew, but it was college-based and therefore somewhat elitist. Boxing and horse racing were behind baseball in popularity. However, after WWII the GI Bill plus growth in public universities and the establishment of a few pro football leagues (mainly in the industrial midwest) laid the foundation for the growth of football. Subsequently, the NFL and NCAA benefited tremendously from shrewd management in the era of network-based television.

    Soccer is growing rapidly in the US now, being driven by another cultural phenomenon – globalization, which is focused on the internet. Basketball is also successfully riding this wave, taking an American game in the other direction to the rest of the world. The inability of baseball and gridiron football to exploit globalization has been led to the rapid aging of their fan bases.

    Sports’ gains and losses in popularity come as a result of adapting to technological and cultural changes; not due to any specific features that make the games more or less desirable.

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  3. Derek
    June 5, 2016

    I think it’s more of an economic issue (i.e.- there’s not enough money left for soccer after American Football, Baseball, and Basketball). I don’t think anything in particular about the game, as is, is keeping it from being popular in America. It’s more in the formative years of many modern sports in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, for many reasons, including a still rampant ‘American Exceptionalism’ culture, America chose American Football and Baseball to be its major sports leagues.

    Today, it’s not the game of soccer, itself, that is keeping it from being hugely popular. It’s the fact that with 3 major sports leagues already that (despite what nationalistic Europeans may say) in many ways appeal beyond just the American audience, there is no room or money for soccer. Top athletes in major sports leagues make upwards of $10-15 a year in salaries. The NBA, MLB, and NFL all pay these types of salaries. In order for the MLS to pull in top talent and make itself one of the top soccer leagues in the world (thus, signifying that it is popular in America), it would need to also pay out those kinds of salaries to attract the talent. Also, once the prospect of playing soccer becomes profitable to Americans, some of our top athletic talent would be diverted from American Football, Baseball, and Basketball. It’s not that Americans are athletic enough or ‘good’ enough to play soccer well on the international level. It’s more that our top athletic talent have more options to choose from than most other countries, and so far, have chosen other sports to play.

    As soon as America starts attracting and retaining top talent in the MLS, it will catch fire here. That can already be seen a bit from the effects of David Beckham coming to the LA Galaxy after retiring from English soccer and the deep (if not lucky) run the US National Team had at the last World Cup. It’s a slow process, but I think the US will eventually come around. There’s plenty of ‘haters’ here, but, to be honest, from what I can tell as a whole, the US is coming (slowly) to enjoy and support soccer. Give it another 5-15 years, and I think it’ll be more prominent here, as sports like Baseball and Basketball are slowly waning in popularity due to boring-ness, and the entitled and extravagant personalities that are ruining the games and slowly detracting normal people from being fans.

    Reply

    • Jacob
      August 10, 2016

      I see your point about the weakness of MLS… But I don’t think that’s as important as you’re suggesting.
      For one thing, soccer is still extremely profitable. There is much more than MLS… The best players go to Europe, so the best Americans can still earn extremely high wages (as high as NFL etc), just by going to Europe.
      Also, look at Brazil. Admittedly, there was once a time when the best South American talent did in fact play in Brazil… But it should still be noted that nowadays the best players in Brazil can’t earn the very top salaries without going to Europe… The Brasileirão in Brazil isn’t massively stronger than MLS… The best young Brazilians (such as Neymar, or more recently Gabriel Jesus) are signed by European clubs.

      Reply

  4. Taariq Shabazz
    March 23, 2015

    Soccer fields should be dramatically decreased and have less players on the field at a time. This would allow for a lot more scoring and more emphasis on dribbling and tricks instead of watching senseless running.

    Reply

    • Spencer
      June 4, 2015

      Yes, scoring goals is a time to celebrate, but have you thought about how it will drastically reduce the celebration of goals. If games end up having upwards of 10 goals scored it will take away from the stadium wide celebrations. It just changes the game in ways I personally don’t want to see and I know many others who would argue with me.

      Reply

    • Jacob
      August 10, 2016

      So basically turn it into an American sport…?
      These comments are from people who clearly don’t understand the game; you can’t understand why it is so popular and why people love it and then suggest taking away the very elements that make it an intelligent, creative and popular sport.

      Reply

  5. Taariq Shabazz
    March 23, 2015

    One aspect that possibly contributes to soccers unpopularity in the US would be americans need for frequent and constant excitement. For example in football, basketball, and baseball(popular american sports) scoring is frequent and keeps the crowd in constant excitement.

    Reply

    • Taariq Shabazz
      March 23, 2015

      Soccer fields should be dramatically decreased and have less players on the field at a time. This would allow for a lot more scoring and more emphasis on dribbling and tricks instead of watching senseless running.

      Reply

      • beto
        February 23, 2016

        If you want to watch a smaller field and more scoring watch futsal (indoor soccer/football)

        Reply

    • Oscar Trout
      March 24, 2015

      re: frequent excitement.

      Americans seem to have no problems watching baseball, a sport where the action is often intermittent.

      Reply

    • Tony
      April 19, 2016

      Well, I you see j don’t understand how baseball is considered more exciting, I mean fans can be sitting and watching a man foul off a ball 6-10 times in a row and eventually strike out. To me at least that’s boring

      Reply

    • Jacob
      August 10, 2016

      Not only is Baseball boring with little action, basically the only action *is* the scoring. The point about soccer is that the enjoyment and action is in other areas than actually scoring…
      I mean is a near goal (where the ball goes narrowly wide) actually less exciting than a goal? If so, then surely you’re just watching for the goal itself, and not the sport itself.

      Reply

  6. michael
    July 11, 2014

    Reply to steve: actually such a rule exists (when a player falls down on purpose). It’s called “acting” and the player is granted with a “yellow card”. A second yellow card and he is out, therefore leaving his team with 10 players.

    Reply

    • Jacob
      August 10, 2016

      Well it’s called simulation, never heard acting being used… But I think the point is that regardless of it being outlawed, it happens.
      But every sport has these sort of dark sides… Happens in basketball too.

      Reply

  7. Fernanda
    July 1, 2014

    We, THE WORLD, don’t care if it is less or not popular in U.S
    🙂

    Reply

  8. steve
    June 24, 2014

    the reason is because all the diving and overacting by the players they barely get touched and fall to the ground crying in pain then get up and start playing again americans don’t like fake flops in sports and leave the acting to hollywood they should have a rule like hockey called embellishment and that’s a penalty when you dive to the ground

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  9. Jim Norris
    June 12, 2014

    Soccer will become more popular in the United States ONLY when the rules are changed; e.g. make the goal HIGHER, change the clock (count DOWN, not count UP), allow substitutions/change lines while in-play (like ice hockey) and get more AMERICAN players, or at least those who can speak passable English.
    You might also try quitting your crying about: Soccer (we will NEVER call it ‘Football’) is the most popular sport in the world, and should also be so in the USA for just that reason, and realizing that, until you have the potential to exponentially score more goals, NOTHING will ever change in the USA. Soccer, as it is, puts most of us to sleep.

    Reply

    • Oscar Trout
      March 24, 2015

      Jim, modifications to the game have been attempted and were basically unsuccessful. The changes made little impact in drawing new fans, and the changes worked to alienate fans already familiar to game. Ultimately, the leagues that made similar changes became more of a novelty than they already were.

      Reply

    • Jacob Cristo
      March 31, 2015

      There are substitutions in soccer, why would we make the goal higher? And for the sport to get more “american” players, you’d have to PLAY. So ignorant

      Reply

      • nolan
        April 13, 2016

        These football crazed egg heads cant appreciate anything that doesn’t involve brute force or constant commercial breaks. Playing soccer well is like making fine art, football is like an idiot beating a nail into a board

        Reply

    • Lazy_Bones
      March 20, 2016

      So FIFA has to change the rules of the game, adopted and adhered to by the rest of the World, to make it more appealing for one country? No thanks, let’s just leave it as it is – everyone else can marvel at the beautiful game, and you can stratch your heads in bemusment whilst watching sports as boring as basketball and baseball. Seeing as 1 in 4 of the US population will be of Latin or Hispanic descent within the next 20 years, I would say learning Spanish would be a pre-requisite over learning English in order to play the game there in the near future.

      I hate to break this to you, especially given that many of you walk around thinking you’re the greatest country on Earth……but no-one gives a single crap that Americans don’t like “soccer”.

      Reply

  10. Robert Gaspar Majestic
    March 25, 2014

    Technology has a huge effect on why soccer is not popular in the USA. Some people are too busy on their job and they don’t have time playing or watching soccer.

    Reply

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