Category Archives: Social Policy

HOTMA Expands Opportunities for Low-Income Families

hud-logoLow-income families have historically struggled to access low-poverty neighborhoods through federal housing programs. They have been challenged by a number of barriers, from transportation to discrimination, and have been left with no other alternative but to move into areas of concentrated poverty. But with HOTMA, there is hope.

H.R. 3700, the Housing and Opportunity through Modernization Act of 2015 (HOTMA), has unanimously passed both the House and the Senate. President Obama is expected to sign this bill that updates several components of the nation’s low-income housing programs. Among other changes, the bill boosts an effective tool to serve low-income families: project-based vouchers. Continue reading

Our Winter 2015 Print Journal is Here!

Our new print edition is out! After months of hard work, the Sanford Journal of Public Policy is proud to announce that our Winter 2015 print journal is ready to go, and we couldn’t be more proud of it.

Sanford Journal Spring 2015 Print Journal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Medicaid Expansion and Health Insurance Uptake, In Two Maps

The New York Times just published an article detailing changes in newly-insured people through the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare. 

Since passage of the ACA, people have become insured for a variety of reasons. Some gained insurance through expanded Medicaid coverage. The below map is from The Advisory Board Company and shows states that accepted and denied the ACA’s Medicaid expansion.

The two maps do not coincide perfectly, but there are some correlations. Check out Arkansas, Kentucky, and West Virginia in relation to their non-Medicaid-expanded neighbors. Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Maine look similar on the first map for apparently different reasons.

What patterns do you see?

Prostitution: Conscious Choice or Wage Slavery?

The issue of human trafficking is one that has garnered increased attention recently in national headlines and human rights discussions. With the U.N. approximating more than 2.5 million victims worldwide, and leaders like President Obama bringing trafficking issues to the forefront of domestic and international policy, little debate has arisen to dispute the consensus that global action be taken to correct this great injustice.

Photo © FBI.gov

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Research Sheds Light on Risk Factors for Hispanic Students in North Carolina

With North Carolina’s changing demographics come changing classrooms. Research from three Duke professors shows special risk factors for Hispanic children in the state.

Empty school hallway

The number of people migrating to the U.S. doubled between 1990 and 2008. By 2009, 38.5 million people in the US were foreign-born (around 12.5% of the total population). Most of the new migrants came from Mexico and elsewhere in Latin America. During this period, the destination of the families also switched from traditional places, like Texas and California, to new destinations—among them, North Carolina.

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