Category Archives: Health Care Policy

Consumer Choice in Health Insurance Markets Under the Affordable Care Act

If you’ve never had to shop for health insurance, consider yourself lucky. Between searching for affordable premiums, making sense of co-pays and coinsurance, and finding a plan with your favorite doctor, choosing a good health plan can be a daunting task. As a health policy student, I tried my hand last month at choosing a plan on the North Carolina exchange. Despite being well-versed in insurance concepts, I too struggled to figure out which plan would be best for me among the many options.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been successful in its goals of increasing access to health insurance while preserving choice and competition in health insurance markets. It brought nearly 11 million people into the individual market who previously didn’t have insurance, and it offered them a variety of health insurance options to choose from. Despite achieving such historic milestones, however, it remains to be seen what the future might hold for the ACA. Until then, policymakers must continue working to make the process of buying insurance easier for the average American. Continue reading

Why Planned Parenthood funding is more important than you think

1 in 5 women has visited Planned Parenthood at least once in her life.

1 in 5 women has visited Planned Parenthood at least once in her life.

Donations to Planned Parenthood affiliates in Texas tripled after Election Day. Many donors fear that a Trump presidency will strip Planned Parenthood of funding and limit the provision of reproductive health services to women. People are quick to equate Planned Parenthood with abortion, but the conversation should be much broader. Family planning clinics like Planned Parenthood provide affordable services for women that improve a wide-range of maternal health outcomes.

Maternal mortality – defined as the death of a women while pregnant or within 42 days of the end of pregnancy – is an important indicator of women’s health outcomes in a country. The US is one of the few countries worldwide that experienced an increase in maternal mortality between 2000 and 2015. Because family planning clinics provide prenatal services to women that reduce the risks of pregnancy, they are important combatants of these negative trends. Continue reading

Biggest Threat to Zika? Mosquito Love.

Photo Credit: James Gathany

Photo Credit: James Gathany

As of November 18th, the World Health Organization (W.H.O.) declared that Zika is no longer a global emergency. However, Dr. Peter Salama, executive director of the W.H.O.’s health emergency programs, stated that “we are not downgrading the importance of Zika. We are sending the message that Zika is here to stay, and the W.H.O response is here to stay.”

Though the W.H.O. has downgraded the threat of Zika, combating Zika remains a goal of the global health community. At the end of October 2016, $18 million was put towards a project to release millions of genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. These mosquitoes were infected with a bacteria called Wolbachia to mate with Aedes aegypti mosquitos that transmit Zika, as well as Dengue and Chikungunya.

Continue reading

Medicaid Expansion and Health Insurance Uptake, In Two Maps

The New York Times just published an article detailing changes in newly-insured people through the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare. 

Since passage of the ACA, people have become insured for a variety of reasons. Some gained insurance through expanded Medicaid coverage. The below map is from The Advisory Board Company and shows states that accepted and denied the ACA’s Medicaid expansion.

The two maps do not coincide perfectly, but there are some correlations. Check out Arkansas, Kentucky, and West Virginia in relation to their non-Medicaid-expanded neighbors. Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Maine look similar on the first map for apparently different reasons.

What patterns do you see?

Physicians’ Responsibility to Consider Cost

Physicians have a responsibility to patients – and to society, who shares the cost – to factor cost into treatment decisions. Medicine does not operate in a vacuum. Allocating dollars, in a family budget as in a state or federal budget, means making trade-offs. American medicine often ignores this reality. As a result, we spend more money per capita on healthcare than any other country but have little to show for it (see below). We’ve got to wise up. Physicians and other healthcare professionals – those who’ve chosen to care for society – should be leading this charge, not dragging their feet behind it. Some are, but too many are not. Continue reading

New proposed nutrition labels are here!

In a follow-up to an earlier blog entry this week, yesterday the Food and Drug Administration announced new proposed food labels. On the labels, calories and servings per container are more prominently displayed in a larger size. The new labels will also clarify that the nutrition information listed is for one serving, specifying the serving size directly, instead of leading the consumer to possibly assume that the nutrition information is for the entire container. In addition, added sugars were proposed to be added to the label to complement total sugars. To comment on the proposed labels, go to www.regulations.gov within the next 90 days.

Proposed nutrition facts label from the FDA:

Nutrition Facts Label Proposed Format (350x660)

Image courtesy of the FDA.

http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm387114.htm