Healthcare and Innovation

It is unbelievable how fast this summer has gone and how much I have learned at Gallup. In my last post, I gushed over how much I love living in Chicago (still do!). For my second post – and because it’s all I think about every day – I am going to get a little bit more into the specifics of what I’m doing at Gallup.

My client is a medical device company and I’m working on a project looking at how to improve their innovative services and programs.  This project immediately begs the question: what is innovation in this context? The first question on most people’s minds regarding the future is healthcare is how are we going to control our costs? This is something we discussed in Don Taylor’s Comparative Health Policy class this past spring. While the United States spends the most money on healthcare (as a percentage of GDP), we don’t have the best healthcare outcomes (see below).

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Can we learn from other countries that have lower healthcare costs? It’s a lot easier said than done. One reason being that providing healthcare in the United States is a lot different than providing healthcare in a country where their people, lifestyles and healthcare could be completely different.

For the next couple of weeks, I will be interviewing customers and analyzing their feedback. The qualitative analysis will help us understand what customers believe are the most innovative services and programs. From there, we can put together a recommendation on how our client can deliver these services.

There are so many moving parts in the healthcare industry today from implementation of electronic health records to some hospitals placing an emphasis on preventive healthcare. New technology and research is introduced every day. I’m excited to see what results my project will bring about. As the dynamic world of healthcare is constantly changing, it is encouraging to see medical device companies take a stake in the future by looking at ways to improve their services and programs.

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