Refugees: Pathways, Experiences, and Resettlement, 10/19, 7-8:30 pm (UNC)

(This event is at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For more information, please visit here.)

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 7-8:30 PM. COURSE #3505

Co-presenters Scott Phillips and Josh Hinson

Scott’s presentation: Refugees welcomed to the United States come from all over the world, represent a variety of religions, and are invariably hard-working individuals. This session will explore and examine the realities facing refugees resettling in the US, in particular North Carolina; as well as provide updates on current political contexts, such as the travel ban. The session will provide an overview of the refugee issue at the local level with an exploration of the resettlement process, examining both theory as well as practical aspects, through a discussion of local resettlement efforts. The session will also highlight means and methods for community engagement.

Josh’s presentation: Research shows that refugees experience disproportionately high rates of chronic health and mental health issues, including anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and other stress-related disorders. Refugees also face a multitude of barriers to accessing healthcare services, including lack of culturally appropriate treatment and limited access to interpretation services. This session will focus on the refugee experience in North Carolina, and explore the ethical obligations of healthcare professionals to participate in their care. The session will also provide information and resources on best practices for working with refugees in North Carolina.

P. Scott Phillips is a native North Carolinian who joined the US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants North Carolina Field Office as director in November 2015. Before taking on this role, Dr. Phillips has worked in the fields of community development, civil rights, and advocacy for about 15 years. His experiences include serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in Ukraine, carrying out research on marginalized groups in Jordan, Israel and the UK, and promoting greater civic engagement at Duke University. He brings a wide-ranging set of skills and experiences to the office of Director. Dr. Phillips received his Ph.D. in Ethnic Relations from the University of Warwick (Coventry UK), a Certificate in Nonprofit Management from Duke University, a Master’s in Political Science and a B.A. in Anthropology, both from Appalachian State University.

Quentin Joshua (Josh) Hinson is a clinical assistant professor in the School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His professional interests include immigration, immigrant health, mental health and substance abuse, community organizing and sustainable development. He received a master’s in Social Work at UNC, with a concentration in Adult Mental Health Direct Practice. Josh also serves as a clinical therapist for El Futuro, Inc., and provides mental health and substance abuse assessments and counseling for Spanish-speaking adults and adolescents. He is the recent recipient of the 2017 UNC School of Social Work’s Excellence in Public Service and Engagement Award.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *