In Our Backyard: The Realities of Post-Resettlement Life and Community-Based Approaches to Rebuilding Home, 11/2, 7-8:30 pm (UNC)

(This event is at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For more information, please visit here.)

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 7-8:30 PM. COURSE #3507

Real-life stories – beyond the facts/figures, de-bugging some of the myths. What are the realities of daily life as a refugee? What are the barriers to refugee support efforts, how do we make them sustainable, what are the benefits and challenges of academic/community partnerships, and what solutions can we provide within the local community, to integrate refugees and respond to the need? Join us as we engage with refugee community leaders, share their stories, celebrate successes, and learn ways the community can get involved.

Madison Hayes, Executive Director, Refugee Community Partnership of Chapel Hill, Carrboro.

Madison’s work centers around building vibrant, sustainable food systems that bolster resilient local economies. She co-founded the Refugee Community Partnership in Carrboro, NC, and designed its community-led food distribution program, The Food Mint, a hallmark of local community-driven food access solutions. She serves on the Board of Directors for three local organizations, and is an advisor and guest instructor at UNC. Prior to The Food Mint, Madison served as Executive Director of the Office of Community Outreach, Dissemination and Education at the UNC Center for AIDS Research. She was the co-leader of a nationwide coalition that plants and grows Community Advisory Boards at health research institutions. In 2014, she presented to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other national leaders on coalition building between academic institutions and communities. Madison holds a degree in Mass Communications from the University of North Carolina-Asheville, and a certification from Duke University in Non-Profit Leadership.

Nicole Accordino is project co-director at Transplanting Traditions Community that helps refugees develop entrepreneurial skills through sustainable farming.  The project is located on an eight-acre plot of land in Chapel Hill, where refugees, most of whom are Burmese, harvest produce to sell.  One hundred percent of the generated profit goes directly back to the farmers. The organization also provides English, communication, public speaking and leadership skills classes as well as childcare in the summer.

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