Mentored Research Experience for 3rd Year Medical School and Nursing Students

Duke medical school students have the unique opportunity of a full year of research during their third year. Additionally, Duke nursing students also have a required research track.

Duke Center for Research to Advance Healthcare Equity offers students a number of opportunities to conduct mentored research under the REACH Equity Center umbrella with an established investigator.

Consistent with the theme of the center, we will preferentially target research projects focused on interventions to impact disparities in the clinical encounter by improving the quality of patient-centered care through better provider communication, high quality interpersonal processes of care, and shared decision-making.

Students participating in this program will engage in REACH Equity activities, including Research Works in Progress seminars, and the annual center colloquium, as well as interacting with REACH Equity-affiliated junior and senior investigators.

Current potential research topics available to students are:

  • Racial disparities in end-of-life care (hospice, advance care planning)
  • Racial and ethnic inequalities
  • Provider communication in the clinical encounter
  • Developing and testing implicit bias
  • Shared decision-making in cardiovascular health delivery and health outcomes
  • Racial disparities in ICU care

 

2018-2019 Research Scholar:

 

Maya Torain
MD Candidate, 2020
Project: "The patient point-of-view: Characterizing patient-level factors associated with perceptions of health care"

2019-2020 Research Scholars:


Rebecca Fabbro
MD Candidate, 2021
Duke University School of Medicine
Project: The association of patient perceptions of the quality of care with trust in providers and trust in the healthcare system among black and white patients with type 2 diabetes

Project Aims
Aim 1: Examine the association between patients’ perceptions of care and both trust in their provider and trust in the healthcare system.
Aim 2: Determine how patients’ perceptions of care moderate the association between health outcomes (glycemic control, medication adherence) and both mistrust and providers and in the healthcare system.


 


Olivia Lin
MD Candidate, 2021
Duke University School of Medicine
Project: Association of provider implicit bias training with patient perceptions of healthcare and healthcare outcomes.

Project Aims
Aim 1: Determine the extent to which implicit bias training is associated with patients’ perception of the quality of their health care.
Aim 2: Determine the extent to which implicit bias training is associated with medication adherence and no-show rates.


 


Hadley Reid
MD Candidate, 2021
Duke University School of Medicine
Project: Association of interpersonal processes of care and health outcomes in patients with type II diabetes

Project Aims
Aim 1: Determine the association between patient perceptions of care (measured by the Interpersonal Processes of Care (IPC) Survey) and glycemic control in Black and non-Hispanic white patients with Type II diabetes.
Aim 2: Determine the association between patient perceptions of care (measured by the IPC survey) and no-show rates and medication adherence.


 

If you are interested in meeting a faculty mentor to discuss a potential project, please e-mail Cheryl Miller, cheryl.j.miller@duke.edu with your topic of interest.