Teaching

I am enthusiastic about teaching development economics, applied microeconometrics, labor economics and health economics. I enjoy working with both undergraduate and graduate students, and I am excited to help both groups learn new techniques, methods, and topics in economics. I also enjoy assisting undergraduate and graduate students in developing their own research questions and applying microeconometric tools to answer these questions.

My teaching philosophy lies in first emphasizing the motivation underlying all topics and techniques in economics, in order to get students excited and passionate about the subject matter I teach. Second, I focus on encouraging student interaction inside the classroom, both with me as an instructor and with other learners, in order to continuously gauge student progress. Third, I design discussions, quizzes, and other assignments to identify which students are struggling and where, in order to provide individualized support at the first sign of struggle. Fourth, I emphasize microeconomic intuition and extensions outside the classroom at every stage of learning, in order to improve student comprehension and increase students’ ability to apply the relevant skills after the course’s completion. Fifth, I believe in respecting the diversity of learners and adapting to suit the various learning styles of diverse students, in order to ensure all students are included. Finally, and most importantly, I ensure to maintain a friendly, respectful, and encouraging relationship with my students and make myself available to students outside the classroom, in order to provide students with the encouragement, support and guidance they need to thrive.

Teaching Certification

Certificate in College Teaching, Duke University, In Progress

Teaching Experience

Instructor of Record: Intermediate Microeconomics I, Duke University, Summer I 2020

  • Undergraduate-level intermediate microeconomic theory
  • Approximately 20 undergraduates

Guest Instructor: Development Economics: Theory, Evidence and Policy, Duke University, Spring 2019

  • Measurement error, instrumental variables, and applications in development economics
  • Approximately 20 undergraduates

Teaching Assistant: Development Economics: Theory, Evidence and Policy, Duke University, Spring 2019, Spring 2017, Spring 2016

  • Research design, data management, OLS, instrumental variables, difference-in-difference, measurement error, topics in development economics, and applications in Stata
  • Approximately 20 undergraduates

Teaching Assistant: Short Course on Program Evaluation and Causal Inference, IZA in Lusaka, Zambia, Oct. 2016

  • Difference-in-difference, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, propensity score matching, randomized control trials, and applications in Stata
  • Approximately 40 faculty, policy-makers, and graduate students from several African countries

Teaching Assistant: Short Course on Program Evaluation and Causal Inference, IZA in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Dec. 2015

  • Difference-in-difference, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, propensity score matching, randomized control trials, and applications in Stata
  • Approximately 40 faculty, policy-makers, and graduate students from several South Asian countries

Teaching Assistant: Introduction to Mandarin, STARTALK, Katy ISD, Summer 2009

  • Secondary-level introduction to Mandarin
  • Approximately 40 secondary students

Teaching Evaluations

Selected comments from teaching evaluations for my role as Teaching Assistant for Development Economics: Theory, Evidence and Policy at Duke University:

  • Rachel was extremely helpful. She is very smart and always willing to be flexible with her time. Very proactive. Amazing! Best TA I’ve ever had.
  • She is very helpful. Always easy to reach out to and willing to help. She is very knowledgeable in the research topics and techniques and is able to help guide the research process in the right direction.
  • She was always willing to answer my questions – both in office hours and over email. I can’t thank her enough for her help.
  • She was very accessible, didn’t necessarily give you the answers to your questions but rather made you think about them and come up with solutions on your own.