Spring 2017 F32 Series

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The Postdoc F32 Grantsmanship Seminar Series is sponsored by Duke Postdoctoral Services. A light breakfast is provided at each session.


Tues May 16, 9:30-10:30 am

WHAT: “An Intro to NIH F32 Awards” with Stephanie Freel, PhD
WHERE: Rm 143 Jones Bldg
REGISTER: http://tinyurl.com/Spring2017F32

The Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA F32) for Individual Postdoctoral Fellowships provides up to three years of support for promising postdocs who have the potential to become productive, independent investigators within the broad scope of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research, and to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists is available to address the Nation’s biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. Please note that F32 awards are limited to US citizens and permanent residents.

In this seminar, Stephanie Freel, PhD, PMP, will give an overview of the F32 award mechanism, including positioning oneself  for success, responding to core review criteria, and writing to promote a successful application.

SPEAKER: Stephanie Freel, PhD, PMP, is the Associate Director of Outreach and Mentorship in the Duke Office for Clinical Research (DOCR). A recent transplant from the Office for Faculty Mentoring, where she developed the K Club and Path to Independence Programs, she now oversees the DOCR study planning, grant review, and mentorship programs for faculty, postdocs, fellows, residents, and study staff conducting clinical research (more information on DOCR programs can be found here). Her work with NRSA applicants within the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, DHVI, and Radiation Oncology resulted in an 80% success rate with 4 first submission awards since 2012.

Watch on the Duke Postdoctoral Services YouTube Channel


Tues May 23, 9:30-10:30 am

WHAT: NIH F32 Awards: Perspectives from Awardees
WHERE: Rm 143 Jones Bldg
REGISTER: http://tinyurl.com/Spring2017F32Awardees

The Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA/F32) for Individual Postdoctoral Fellowships provides up to three years of support for promising postdocs who have the potential to become productive, independent investigators within the broad scope of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research, and to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists is available to address the Nation’s biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs.  Please join us to hear from a panel of Duke postdocs who have successfully applied for the F32 Award. Panelists will discuss their personal experience applying for an F32, the awards process, finding support, and tips for success (or failure and then success, in the case of those who applied more than once!)

PANELISTS:

  • Kathryn Dickerson, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. She was awarded an F32 from NIMH.
  • Kacy Gordon, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Biology. She was awarded an F32 from NIGMS.
  • Erin Kaltenbrun, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Pharmacology  and Cancer Biology. She was awarded an F32 from NCI.
  • Ryan Schweller, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. He was awarded an F32 from NHLBI.

Watch on the Duke Postdoctoral Services YouTube Channel


Thurs Jun 29, 9:30-10:30 am

WHAT: “Effective Written Communication” with Joanna Downer, PhD, Associate Dean for Research Development
WHERE: Rm 143 Jones Bldg
REGISTER: http://tinyurl.com/Spring2017F32Comm

During this session, you will learn how to effectively communicate your ideas and plans to grant reviewers. Led by Joanna Downer, PhD, Associate Dean for Research Development for the Duke School of Medicine, this session will teach you how to apply the writing principles developed by Dr. George Gopen, Professor of the Practice Emeritus of the Duke University Writing Program, as well as Dr. Downer’s own tips and tricks for effectively revising your own work. Dr. Downer has extensive experience in grant writing and has contributed to the successful acquisition of a number of large center-type research grants for School of Medicine faculty.

SPEAKER: Joanna Downer joined the Chancellor’s and School of Medicine’s Dean’s Offices at Duke Medicine in January 2006. Since 2009, she has led the Office of Research Development at the School of Medicine. She previously worked in science writing and media relations, first at Duke Medicine and then at Johns Hopkins Medicine. At Duke, she covered basic and clinical cancer research, and at Hopkins she covered the biomedical sciences, genetic medicine, and cell engineering. She also has extensive experience in scientific editing. Joanna holds an MA and PhD in nuclear chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis. While in graduate school, she was a Mass Media Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, placed at Time Magazine in Washington DC. Joanna also earned a BS with Honors in chemistry from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh PA.

Access to this video is limited to the Duke Community. Please email for the link.