2021 NIH F32 and K99 Grantwriting Series

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Thurs May 20, 11 am – 12 pm

WHAT: An Intro to NIH NRSA F32 Awards
REGISTER: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_eaFznYpmtvLPxQO

The Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA F32) for Individual Postdoctoral Fellowships provide up to three years of support for promising postdocs who have the potential to become productive, independent investigators within the broad scope of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research, and to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists is available to address the Nation’s biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs. Please note that F32 awards are limited to US citizens and permanent residents.

In this seminar, Sohini Sengupta, PhD, MPH, will give an overview of the F32 award mechanism, including positioning oneself  for success, responding to core review criteria, and writing to promote a successful application.

SPEAKER: Sohini Sengupta, PhD, MPH, is Director of the Duke Office of Campus Research Development (OCRD), where she provides proposal development and grant writing programming to help Duke faculty and the broader campus community submit high quality proposals.

Watch session (access is limited to the Duke Community. Please email for the link).


Weds May 26, 10-11 am

WHAT: NIH F32 Awards: Perspectives from Awardees
REGISTER: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_eJsz61igj8CcNv0

The Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Postdoctoral Fellowships (NRSA F32) provide up to three years of support for promising postdocs who have the potential to become productive, independent investigators within the broad scope of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research, and to help ensure that a diverse pool of highly trained scientists is available to address the Nation’s biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research needs.  Please join us to hear from a panel of Duke postdocs who have successfully applied for the F32 Award. Panelists will discuss their personal experience applying for an F32, the awards process, finding support, and tips for success (or failure and then success, in the case of those who applied more than once!)

PANELISTS:

  • Lee Dolat, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology. He was awarded an F32 from NIAID.
  • Cameron Prigge, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Neurobiology. She was awarded an F32 from NEI.
  • Rachel Shahan, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Biology. She was awarded an F32 from NIGMS.
  • Susannah Zietz, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Center for Child and Family Policy, School of Public Policy. She was awarded an F32 from NICHD.

Watch a previous session on the Duke Postdoctoral Services YouTube Channel


Tues June 8, 11 am – 12 pm

WHAT: Tips for Writing a Successful K99 Application
REGISTER: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1Xthy6gjOZMDRcy

The NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) is designed for postdocs who are interested in a quicker transition to becoming an independent researcher The award provides up to 5 years of support consisting of two phases: 1-2 years of mentored support for postdoctoral research scientists, followed by up to 3 years of independent support contingent on securing an independent tenure-track or equivalent research position. The K99/R00 award is open to both US citizens and non-US citizens. This workshop will go over grant writing tips and considerations for K99/R00 applications.

SPEAKER: Sohini Sengupta, PhD, MPH, is Director of the Office of Campus Research Development (OCRD), where she helps investigators prepare competitive grant applications.

Watch session (access is limited to the Duke Community. Please email for the link)


Tues June 22, 11 am – 12 pm

WHAT: NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00): Perspectives from Awardees
REGISTER: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6sBe6XApQ7CNVMa

The NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) is designed to help postdocs transition from a mentored postdoctoral research position to a stable independent research position at an earlier stage than is currently the norm. The award provides up to 5 years of support consisting of two phases: 1-2 years of mentored support for postdoctoral research scientists, followed by up to 3 years of independent support contingent on securing an independent tenure-track or equivalent research position. The K99/R00 award is open to both US citizens and non-US citizens.

Please join us to hear from a panel of current and former Duke postdocs who have successfully applied for the prestigious NIH K99/R00 Award. Panelists will discuss their experience applying for a K99, the K99 awards process, transitioning from the K phase to the R phase (including how the award and COVID impacted their faculty job search), and tips for success (or failure and then success, in the case of those who applied more than once!)

PANELISTS:

  • Hema Adhikari, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology. She was awarded a K99/R00 from NCI.
  • Luis Gomez, PhD (former Duke postdoc in Brain Stimulation and Neurophysiology) is Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University. He was awarded a K99/R00 from NIMH.
    Christopher Kassotis, PhD (former Duke postdoc in the Nicholas School of the Environment) is Assistant Professor, Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University. He was awarded a K99/R00 from NIEHS.
  • Lauren Slosky, PhD, is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Cell Biology. She was awarded a K99/R00 from NIDA.

Watch a previous session on the Duke Postdoctoral Services YouTube Channel


Thurs Oct 28, 11 am- 12 pm

WHAT: A Workshop in Effective Communication: The 5 Cs of Sentence and Story
REGISTER: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8c4el1hLn7sNqS2

This session will help researchers develop skills for improved academic writing. The workshop will focus on the “5 Cs” of effective writing: making sure it is clear, compelling, complete, consistent, and concise. Experienced science writer and scientific editor Joanna Downer, PhD, Associate Dean for Research Development, will share strategies for improved writing and storytelling to make all of your professional communications more effective. Topics will include knowing your audience, choosing the right information, telling a convincing story, and avoiding common pitfalls. Content will be broadly applicable to all types of academic writing.