Cover Durham distributes 43,465 masks in one month

This week, the Cover Durham program, in association with the Community Health Coalition, distributed nearly 21,000 face coverings. These include polypropylene and cotton masks from Original Mattress Factory, hand-sewn masks, and a large shipment of cotton masks provided by CAARE. That makes a total of 43,465 distributed this month.

Cover Durham continues to focus its efforts on Durham’s Hispanic population, which has been disproportionately hit by COVID-19. This week, the Community Health Coalition (CHC) made a large delivery to a church, in addition to distributing 10,115 masks to various bakeries, beauty salons, restaurants, and other small businesses.

Mask distribution to the Hispanic community in Durham

BikeDurham received 1,700 more face coverings to distribute to passengers who use the transit system. buses.

In addition to the Community Health Coalition and Bike Durham distributions, 9,075 face masks were also delivered to churches with services in Spanish, local community organizations, food pantries, two Hispanic soccer leagues, two daycare centers, and Lincoln Community Health Center. These organizations and institutions, in turn, distribute the masks to the people who need it most, including construction workers, janitorial staff, and low-income families.

City Hall On The Go did a great job at Damar Court and Club Boulevard, delivering 1,000 masks at both sites.

Cover Durham is a program dedicated to distributing free face coverings to residents who live in Durham County.

 

How and Who should wear a mask?

According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a cloth face coverings plus social distancing and hand-washing can help slow the spread of COVID-19.

 

CDC Adds 6 More COVID-19 Symptoms

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has added six new symptoms to the list of known COVID-19 symptoms. The additional symptoms include fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, or new loss of taste or smell.

Learn more at: ncdhhs.gov/divisions/public-health/covid19/symptoms-and-testing/covid-19-symptoms

Community Partners Launch “Feeding Durham Together” Volunteer Portal

Durham skyline by Angel Romero

The Durham County Government is encouraging local residents, 18 years and older, to sign up to pack meals, deliver food and perform other essential volunteer roles assisting local food distribution organizations during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The County, with the support and partnership of The Triangle Nonprofit & Volunteer Leadership Center (formerly the Volunteer Center of Durham), has a “one-stop” online portal where local residents can go to volunteer and select specific roles, dates and times with food kitchens, pantries and other agencies in critical need of people to serve key functions.

Once residents have signed up on the Feeding Durham Together online portal, staff will then quickly work to confirm assignments with the food agency and the volunteer. The site and process are designed to efficiently match available volunteers with nonprofits that urgently need their support.

Right now, our community’s hunger challenges are greater than normal,” said Donna Rewalt, Director of Durham County Cooperative Extension and Feeding Coordinator with the Food Security Task Force of Durham County’s Emergency Operations Center. “We strongly encourage community members to volunteer to support our food relief agencies that are on the front lines every day. We have a duty to step up and make sure all Durham residents get the food they need.

Residents can visit the Feeding Durham Together portal at https://tinyurl.com/feedingdurham. After signing up for an account, individuals or groups can quickly volunteer for the shift or shifts that work best for their schedules and abilities. Volunteers receive safety guidance in the portal upon sign-up for shifts.

Durham community members always have demonstrated that they will support each other,” said Kim Shaw, Executive Director of The Triangle Nonprofit & Volunteer Leadership Center. “We’re excited to continue facilitating connections between passionate volunteers and critical food relief nonprofits for the benefit of those who are most in need during this pandemic.”

To learn more about The Triangle Nonprofit & Volunteer Leadership Center, visit here.

Durham FEAST, a Meal Program for Children and Families

Families going to school sites across Durham County, NC will receive free children’s breakfasts and lunches prepared by Durham restaurants, while adults will receive shelf-stable food supplies and/or family-style casseroles. Sites and schedules will be regularly updated at www.durhamfeast.org/sites.

Income Inequality Affects Health and Opportunity in the United States

A new poll from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, National Public Radio, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health describes in dramatic detail the problem that middle- and lower-income household members face when it comes to affording the needs of life in the United States of America.

Unexpected medical or dental bills, food insecurity, skipping a doctor’s appointment or going without medication, finding safe and affordable housing. These are just some of the worries families face due in part to climbing income inequality in the United States.

Key finding include:

  • Significant concerns from the middle class with nearly 50% reporting considerable problems paying for medical bills, dental bills, and prescription drugs.
  • Food insecurity and unaffordable housing are still a chief concern for 3 in 10 lower-income adults who reported serious difficulty in paying for food and nearly 1 in 5 middle-income adults that expressed trouble in finding affordable housing.
  • Health care access is still out of reach for 26% of middle-income earners and 31% of lower-income adults.
  • An unanticipated expense of $1,000 would be difficult to pay for more than two-thirds of lower income adults and one-third of middle-income adults.
  • Despite the problems facing many middle-and lower-income Americans, the majority of adults across income levels believe the American Dream is still alive and within reach.

More at Life Experiences and Income Inequality in the United States

 

Partnership for a Healthy Durham’s Access to Care Committee Meeting on January 9

The Partnership for a Healthy Durham’s Access to Care Committee will hold its next monthly meeting on Thursday, January 9, 2020, at 8:15 a.m. at the Durham County Human Services Building Conference Room B, 414 East Main St., Durham, North Carolina.

Jen Meade with Alliance Health and Heather Mountz with the Duke University School of Nursing will facilitate a needs assessment discussion. The purpose of the assessment is so the Communications committee can learn what other committees are doing in regards to communications, what they would like to be doing, what support they might need to promote their work, ideas for promoting the Partnership as a whole, as well as any communication skills members may have.

There will also be a discussion of the Access to Care Committee’s Action Plan progress and how the participants can move forward together.

More about the Partnership for a Healthy Durham

Partnership for a Healthy Durham Quarterly Meeting in January 2020

The Partnership for a Healthy Durham will hold its next Quarterly meeting on Wednesday, January 15, 2020, noon at the Durham County Human Services Building Conference Rooms B&C, 414 East Main St.

An orientation for anyone who wants to learn more about the Partnership history, structure and how they can get involved will be held prior to the meeting from 11-11:45 am.

The agenda includes a presentation on the 2019 Community Health Assessment Survey results (door-to-door survey conducted in summer 2019).

Lunch that accommodates a variety of diets will be served.

Please RSVP for the meeting and/or orientation session by 5:00 pm on Friday, January 10. If you plan to invite others to the meeting, please forward the RSVP link so they can register as well.

Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP) is Now Open at DSS

 

The Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP) is now open at DSS. This is a seasonal program that assists with heating bills. It opened at the beginning of January and runs until March 31 or until funds run out.

Applications will be taken at DSS in Lobby #27, Monday through Friday, 414 E. Main Street, Durham, NC 27701. 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. However, applicants must arrive before 4:00 p.m. to be seen.

For more information, dial 919-560-8000.

Bring a photo ID, Social Security card, income verification and verification of heating source and heating bill.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Report Reveals Obesity Rates Drop in 41 American States and Territories 

A report released on Thursday, December 19, 2019 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWFJ)  has revealed that  Obesity rates have dropped among young children from lower-income families in the United States. However, the latest data indicates that obesity continues to be a major risk to children’s health:

  • Approximately 1 in every 7 children ages 10 to 17 has obesity.
  • Rates for black and Hispanic youth are considerably higher than rates for white and Asian individuals.

Obesity is one indicator of larger, systemic problems concerning health and equity in American society.

Explore data and policy information by state.