Welcome!

I am a Ph.D. student in the Patek Lab in Duke University’s Department of Biology. I am broadly interested in the ecology, evolution, and biomechanics of acoustic communication in marine organisms, with a particular interest in coastal and benthic invertebrates. I have worked on a variety of systems, from oyster larvae and coral reef fishes to swamp sparrows and snapping shrimp.

I have studied bioacoustics on individual and ecosystem scales, collaborating with several fantastic researchers and laboratories along the way. As an undergraduate at Duke, I performed kinematic analyses of snapping shrimp snaps (Patek Lab), tested for intra-diel improvement of vocal performance in swamp sparrows (Nowicki Lab), and investigated the effects of anthropogenic noise on larval recruitment in North Carolina oyster reefs (Nowacek Lab). I was also a 2017 Summer Student Fellow at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) where I quantified the extent of noise pollution in coral reefs in the U.S. Virgin Islands National Parks (Mooney Lab).

What’s New?

September 2018:  My first publication is out! With some folks at WHOI, we quantified the spatio-temporal patterns of boat noise at 10 coral reefs in the U.S. Virgin Islands National Park over the course of 1 year. Check it out here to find out more about potential drivers of boat noise and the implications for management, experimental methodology, and coral reef biology.

August 2018: I have officially begun my Ph.D. program at Duke!

July 2018: I will be attending the 2018 BioAcoustic Summer School (SeaBASS) at the University of New Hampshire! Ready to learn and excited to connect with other budding bioacousticians.

May 2018: I graduated from Duke University with a B.S. in Biology! I was also awarded the James B. Rast Award for Comparative Organismal Biology! I am excited to stay onboard at Duke to pursue my Ph.D. in Biology with Sheila Patek’s lab!