Propose a Humanities Project for the 2021 Story+ Summer Research Program

Story+ request for proposals.

Deadline: December 4, 2020

The Story+ Summer Research Program is now accepting proposals for Summer 2021 projects that engage undergraduate and graduate students in collaborative research on humanities-based topics. Proposals are due by December 4 at 5:00 p.m.

Faculty are encouraged to link a Story+ project proposal to a 2021-2022 Bass Connections project team. Those wishing to do so must also complete the Bass Connections proposal process, also due December 4, 2020.

About Story+

Story+ is a six-week summer program that immerses interdisciplinary teams of students, faculty and staff in humanities research and public storytelling. Story+ promotes inquiry-based learning and vertically integrated collaboration through projects that may be driven by archival research, oral history, textual analysis, visual analysis, cultural criticism or other humanistic research methods.

Small teams of undergraduates, supervised by graduate student mentors, collaborate on focused projects that contribute to the broader research, teaching, scholarly communications, and/or public engagement agendas of Duke faculty, Duke librarians, nonprofit organizations and other University or non-University project sponsors. Story+ final projects have taken the form of writing, exhibits, websites, annotated archives, short films/videos, podcasts, social media content and other genres.

A typical Story+ team consists of a project sponsor, a graduate student mentor and three undergraduate researchers. Project sponsors benefit from the opportunity to engage a team of students, who are provided with appropriate guidance and mentoring through Story+, in producing a tangible product that may further their work. Story+ undergraduate students learn how to conduct rigorous interpretive research in a team setting, connect academic knowledge to broader social issues and communicate their research stories with diverse audiences – within and outside the University – in a complex media environment. Graduate mentors get the distinctive pedagogical and professional opportunity to manage a complex collaborative project and facilitate the network of relationships that such projects entail.

Call for Proposals Story+ 2021

The Franklin Humanities Institute invites proposals from Duke faculty, archivists and other campus and community members for the Summer 2021 edition of Story+. We seek projects of any topic that are anchored in humanities research methods and questions, with well-defined project goals that can be feasibly completed in six weeks. Outcomes of past Story+ teams have ranged from finished products (e.g., a completed curatorial plan a physical exhibit or a published research report), prototypes or pilot projects (e.g., a prototype online teaching module or a proof-of-concept audio podcast), as well as preliminary, exploratory research that contributes to a larger ongoing project (e.g., oral histories, translation, transcription or archival discovery).

We encourage proposals that build upon or towards course offerings, Humanities Labs, or Bass Connections teams during the regular school year. As possible points of reference, please see our Story+ website for descriptions and outcomes from previous teams. P.I.s or projects previously supported by Story+ are eligible to apply, but note that priority may be given, in these cases, to projects that demonstrate a significantly new direction or outcome.

Individuals are strongly encouraged to consult with Amanda Starling Gould about interest and available opportunities. Story+ is built upon the foundational values of care, inclusion, and community. Our primary objectives are to enable undergraduate and graduate students to participate in rigorous, hands-on humanities research, to facilitate collaborative and creative research transmission and to promote teamwork and interdisciplinarity as humanities modes of work.

Our values also animate how we reach out for partnerships across Duke and beyond Duke, in the projects we solicit and select, in the ways we recruit and support students, and in our common programming throughout the summer. We understand that our work is done with and within a privileged institution of higher education that has a historically complicated relationship with research subjects, objectification and positivism. To generate humanistic research means paying attention to how structures and systems influence the collection of evidence, methods of analysis and communication of results and to our particular identities and contexts as researchers.

This embrace of situated knowledge does not require that Story+ projects adhere to certain topics, modes of work; or presentation practices; it does however, require a self-awareness about the choices any particular project makes from subject matter, to methodology, to communication with the public, to divisions of labor and supervisory authority. As such, we ask all potential and participating partners to consider how you might (no matter your topics or goals) acknowledge, address, or understand intertwining systems of oppression (ableism, racism, sexism, heterosexism, etc.) as you create your projects and, more importantly, your projects’ plans of student work.

Project sponsors should plan to be accessible to their teams on at least a weekly basis and are expected to be regularly available to collaborate with their full team. The most successful and highly ranked of our projects are those with dedicated sponsors and clearly articulated goals.

Please Note: We anticipate Story+ 2021 will again be a remote experience. Feeling a little stuck on how to translate or transform your project to online-only? Amanda Starling Gould is available to help all teams envision and enact collaborative remote research practices and methods.

Please submit proposals via Qualtrics by December 4, 2020 at 5:00 p.m.

The Qualtrics application form will ask for the following components:

  • Brief description of the overall project
  • Description of the specific project goal(s) and output(s) you hope to accomplish through Story+. Please include here a basic timeline (approximately May 13 to June 25), project milestones, expected outcome(s) and how/why this work is important to your research/your unit/your organization.
  • Description of how your project aligns with the mission and goals of Story+ to offer a rich humanities research and public storytelling experience for graduates and undergraduates
  • Workplan: this is optional but ideal. This might include a sketch of methods, methodologies, weekly schedule, opportunities for students, campus/community partners who might collaborate, post-Story+ afterlives of the research.
  • List of essential skills undergraduates will need to contribute to the project
  • Do you have a graduate student in mind for the role of your graduate mentor? If you would like us to help match you with a mentor, please list essential skills you would like this person to have.
  • Any funding from external sources or other Duke units that can support the work of the team

For queries about the program and/or to discuss specific project ideas, please email Amanda Starling Gould. Story+ is funded by Together Duke and administered by the Franklin Humanities Institute in conjunction with Bass Connections, with additional support from the Duke Libraries.

Bring Academic Research to Life through the Story+ Summer Program

Story+.

Deadline: February 14, 2020

Interested in bringing academic research to life through dynamic storytelling? Check out the new projects for the Story+ Summer Research Program before applications open on January 24. The priority deadline to apply is February 14, but applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis.

Explore the 2020 Story+ Projects

Body Work: Reanimating Policy Responses to Coal Mining Disasters

Critical Decisions: Perceptions of AI in Healthcare Management

Curating and Integrating New Visual and Sonic Experiences in the Duke University Musical Instrument Collections

Exhibiting the Blunt Family Papers: The Great Migration at the Rubenstein

Experiential Archive

If a Tree Falls: Hearing Data from Duke Forest

Joining the Electric Circus: Rural Electrification and Gender in the Papers of Louisan Mamer

Manipulated Materials: Documentary Sculpture

Unearthing Root Causes of Migration through Our Stories

How Story+ Works

Story+ is a six-week summer research experience for undergraduate and graduate students interested in bringing academic research to life through dynamic storytelling. It is offered through the Franklin Humanities Institute (FHI) and Bass Connections, with support from Versatile Humanists at Duke and Duke Libraries. It is open to all undergraduates, except graduating seniors, and all graduate students, with preference given to doctoral students in the humanities and interpretive social sciences.

Undergraduates work in small teams with graduate student mentors, in a collaborative and creative research environment. Each project has a sponsor. Students learn to conduct qualitative, humanities-based research (e.g., archival research, narrative analysis, visual analysis, ethnography) and to communicate their research through effective storytelling techniques. Final projects may take the form of writing, websites, exhibits, short films or other media, depending on the project’s goals.

Story+ takes place during Summer Session 1 (May 13 to June 26, 2020). Undergraduates receive up to $3,000 to defray housing and living expenses. Please note that amounts may be lower for projects with off-campus components, as special arrangements for housing, meals, etc. will be made for students at the field sites. For participating students receiving need-based financial aid, Duke will assume responsibility for half of the summer earnings requirement. Graduate students can receive a stipend or travel support up to $2,500.

How to Apply

Story+ applications open on January 24. When applying, students will be able to select and rank up to three Story+ projects. Applicants will be asked to provide the following information:

  • Resume
  • Unofficial transcript
  • One-paragraph statement of interest per project chosen
  • One-paragraph contribution statement per project chosen detailing the experiences, strengths, skills, interests and abilities in humanities research they bring to the project
  • Up to two references (no actual letters, just names and email addresses).

For any questions about the program or application, please contact fhi@duke.edu.

The priority deadline for all student applications is February 14 at 11:59 p.m., but FHI will evaluate applications on a rolling basis, so please get your application in as soon as you can. Full details about each project can be found on the Story+ page.

Talk with Story+ representatives at the Bass Connections Fair on January 24.

Migration’s Many Forms: Finding Creative Ways to Examine the Movement of Populations

Migration Lab faculty and student photos.
Directors, teaching and graduate assistants, and fellows of the Representing Migration Humanities Lab (top row: Charlotte Sussman, Tsitsi Jaji, Domenika Baran, Jarvis McInnis, Corina Stan; second row: Sasha Panaram, Karen Little, Sonia Nayak, Catherine Lee, Isabella Arbelaez; third row: Jessica Covill, Kelsey Desir, Nicole Higgins, Jared Junkin, Dana Johnson; bottom row: Andrew Kim, Trisha Remetir, Hannah Borenstein, Grant Glass, Anna Tybinko)

A few years ago, two associate professors in Duke’s English Department started a reading group to explore their shared interest in human mobility and its cultural expressions. Building on their discussions, Charlotte Sussman and Tsitsi Jaji teamed up with fellow faculty members Dominika Baran, Jarvis McInnis, and Corina Stan to direct the Representing Migration Humanities Lab.

The lab received support from Humanities Unbounded, a five-year initiative funded by an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant.

“We were lucky to have some great graduate students as part of the group convening the lab,” Sussman says. “They made me really enjoy working collaboratively.”

Sussman is the author of Consuming Anxieties: Consumer Protest, Gender, and British Slavery, 1713–1833 and Eighteenth-Century English Literature. Based on her positive experience with the lab, she says she “started looking for different kinds of pedagogies and also opportunities for graduate students.”

Fifteen students have served as Representing Migration fellows, teaching assistants, or graduate lab assistants. Others have taken part in courses and research with faculty.

One of the lab’s projects explored Migration Memorials. Around the same time, over at the Duke Marine Lab, Cindy Van Dover’s lab was studying the impact of seabed mining. “It occurred to them that [mining] grants from the International Seabed Authority were close to the path of the Middle Passage,” Sussman says. Van Dover’s lab became interested in proposing a memorial to victims of the trans-Atlantic voyages that brought enslaved Africans to the New World.

Phillip Turner, a Ph.D. student in Marine Science and Conservation, convened a meeting with a wide range of experts, including Sussman. “They knew about the geography but were curious how the Middle Passage was recorded or memorialized,” she says.

Phillip Turner (second from left) with Aline Jaeckel, Diva Amon, and Jessica Perelman at the 25th Session of the International Seabed Authority in Kingston, Jamaica.
Phillip Turner (second from left) with Aline Jaeckel, Diva Amon, and Jessica Perelman at the 25th Session of the International Seabed Authority in Kingston, Jamaica

Turner organized a coauthored article on ways to commemorate the enslaved people who came to rest on the Atlantic seabed. In 2018, he received a Graduate Student Training Enhancement Grant to attend a meeting of the International Seabed Authority, where he networked and discussed the Middle Passage project. “The project was positively received,” he reported, “and it will hopefully be discussed in more detail at subsequent ISA sessions once the manuscript has been published.”

Kaylee Alexander.
Kaylee Alexander

Sussman had an idea to explore the Middle Passage from a new angle and involve more students through a Data+ summer research project. To help prepare the project, doctoral student Kaylee Alexander (Art, Art History & Visual Studies) worked with Duke Libraries’ Data and Visualization Services as a Humanities Unbounded Graduate Assistant.

“One of the original goals of the project was to use data representing nearly 36,000 transatlantic slave voyages to see if it would be possible to map a reasonable location for a deep-sea memorial to the transatlantic slave trade,” Alexander reflected. “The promises of these data were great; we just had to figure out how to use them.”

Sussman’s Data+ team set out to locate where and why enslaved Africans died during the sea voyage and analyze patterns of these mortality rates.

Chudi Zong, Ethan Czerniecki, Daisy Zhan, Charlotte Sussman, and Emma Davenport at the Data+ poster session.
Chudi Zong, Ethan Czerniecki, Daisy Zhan, Charlotte Sussman, and Emma Davenport at the Data+ poster session

“It’s been really interesting to fill in the gaps of the Middle Passage and search for patterns,” said Chudi Zhong, a master’s student in Statistical Science. “There is a lot of missing data, and we’ve used current technology to fill gaps. For example, using the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, we can find records on how many enslaved people died. The Climatological Database for the World’s Oceans has other kinds of data for ships. We merged the two databases and found 35 matching voyages. Then we used our own model to make predictions.”

Dutch Slaving Voyages (1751-1795): The height of each bar corresponds to the average number of deaths per 150km2 grid. The color of the bar corresponds to the number of ship locations recorded in each grid. [From the Data+ team’s executive summary].
Dutch Slaving Voyages (1751-1795): The height of each bar corresponds to the average number of deaths per 150km2 grid. The color of the bar corresponds to the number of ship locations recorded in each grid. [From the Data+ team’s executive summary]
As an undergraduate majoring in Philosophy and Global Cultural Studies, Ethan Czerniecki said the Data+ project “gave me a different way of approaching these topics outside the humanities that proved to be expansive,” he said. “I wouldn’t have thought to treat these individuals as data points, but [the data science approach] opens up new areas like data visualization. Combining a humanities project with data science is really interesting, and the methodologies interact well.”

Prediction of 2,164 trans-Atlantic voyage paths that ended in the northern hemisphere based on the LSTM model; inset map:  prediction of 36 trans-Atlantic voyage paths based on the LSTM model, all of which have reasonably smooth lines. [From the Data+ team’s executive summary].
Prediction of 2,164 trans-Atlantic voyage paths that ended in the northern hemisphere based on the LSTM model; inset map:  prediction of 36 trans-Atlantic voyage paths based on the LSTM model, all of which have reasonably smooth lines. [From the Data+ team’s executive summary]
English Ph.D. student Emma Davenport served as project manager for the Data+ team. “This was my first experience in a real mentorship role,” she said. “It’s different than being part of a team doing the research. Being a mentor calls for a different set of skills and a different orientation.” Davenport is going on the job market this year. “Job committees want to see that you have a set of skills for guiding undergraduate research,” she said, “and both academic and nonacademic jobs are looking for candidates with a well-rounded skillset. I couldn’t have gotten this experience from traditional teaching and research.”

This fall, a Bass Connections project team is continuing the work of the Representing Migration lab and the Data+ project. Doctoral students in English and Romance Studies and undergraduates representing at least six majors are collaborating with faculty and librarians. Some students are creating a map showing where the deaths occurred in the Atlantic; their original data will support a proposal for the Middle Passage memorial.

Also in this academic year, six graduate and undergraduate students will serve as Representing Migration Humanities Fellows.

“I think these opportunities are really great,” says Sussman. “Duke is not a heavy teaching school, at least for English, relative to other Ph.D. programs, but I think what Duke can offer grad students is more unique. This kind of work is useful to them professionally, whether they go into academia or not.”

In addition to the opportunities she has found to engage students in research on migration, Sussman has tapped into other Duke programs as well.

Undergraduates Clifford Haley, Eli Kline, and Bailey Bogle present “Pirating Texts” at the 2019 Story+ Research Symposium. Photo: Jennifer R. Zhou.
Undergraduates Clifford Haley, Eli Kline, and Bailey Bogle present “Pirating Texts” at the 2019 Story+ Research Symposium. Photo: Jennifer R. Zhou

Grant Glass used a Data Expeditions grant to create a data visualization module for Sussman’s course, Queens of Antiquity. A doctoral student at UNC Chapel Hill, Glass also served as project manager on Sussman’s 2018 Data+ project, Pirating Texts, and as graduate mentor on the 2019 Story+ summer research project of the same name.

Most recently, English Ph.D. student Kimberley Dimitriadis received an Archival Expeditions grant to create a module for Sussman’s medical humanities course, Doctors’ Stories.

“Using this [kind of approach] in your classroom setting involves letting go of authority, and sometimes that works better than others,” says Sussman. “You have to be willing to let go.”

Learn more at a free lunchtime event on December 4 at the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies, featuring Charlotte Sussman and colleagues.

Current Opportunities and Deadlines

Propose a Story+ Humanities Research Project for Summer 2020

Propose a Story+ project for Summer 2020

Deadline: November 4, 2019

About the Program

Story+ is a six-week summer program that immerses interdisciplinary teams of students, faculty, and staff in humanities research and public storytelling. Story+ promotes inquiry-based learning and vertically-integrated collaboration through projects that may be driven by archival research, oral history, textual analysis, visual analysis, cultural criticism, or other humanistic research methods. Small teams of undergraduates, supervised by graduate student mentors, collaborate on focused projects that contribute to the broader research, teaching, scholarly communications, and/or public engagement agendas of Duke faculty, Duke librarians, nonprofit organizations, and other University or non-University project sponsors. Story+ final projects have taken the form of writing, exhibits, websites, annotated archives, short films/videos, podcasts, social media content, and other genres.

A typical Story+ team consists of a project sponsor, a graduate student mentor, and three undergraduate researchers. Project sponsors benefit from the opportunity to engage a team of students, who are provided with appropriate guidance and mentoring through Story+, in producing a tangible product that may further their work. Story+ undergraduate students learn how to conduct rigorous interpretive research in a team setting, connect academic knowledge to broader social issues, and communicate their research stories with diverse audiences – within and outside the University – in a complex media environment. Graduate mentors get the distinctive pedagogical and professional opportunity to manage a complex collaborative project, and facilitate the network of relationships that such projects entail.

Each summer, Story+ designs a central curriculum for participating students based on the lineup of projects. An opening Boot Camp covers basic skills for undergraduate students that apply to all or most teams (e.g., note-taking practices, citation management, relevant digital tools and platforms) and a graduate Public Humanities workshop offers advanced training in the digital and public humanities for Story+ graduate mentors. During the six weeks of the program, there are opportunities to dig deeper into writing, narrative voice, visual storytelling, community engagement, and other important aspects of engaged humanistic scholarship for public audiences.

The program covers student stipends and provides collaborative workspaces for teams, as well as modest project resources upon request (e.g., for books, software). Undergraduates are funded to work full time, Monday to Friday, during the six weeks of the program. Graduate mentors receive a stipend that covers 15-18 hours per week of work to support the undergraduates’ research and the project’s management. Story+ funding can be supplemented by other sources available to the project sponsors, internal or external.

Opportunity to submit a joint proposal for a year-long Bass Connections project and a Summer 2020 Story+ project: Note the opportunity to submit a joint proposal for Story+ alongside a year-long Bass Connections project. Contact Laura Howes at laura.howes@duke.edu if you have questions.

Call for Proposals Story+ 2020

The Franklin Humanities Institute invites proposals from Duke faculty, archivists, and other campus and community members for the Summer 2020 edition of Story+. We seek projects of any topic that are anchored in humanities research methods and questions, with well-defined project goals that can be feasibly completed in six weeks. Outcomes of past Story+ teams have ranged from finished products (e.g., a completed curatorial plan a physical exhibit or a published research report), prototypes or pilot projects (e.g., a prototype online teaching module or a proof-of-concept audio podcast), as well as preliminary, exploratory research that contributes to a larger ongoing project (e.g., oral histories, translation, transcription, or archival discovery). We encourage proposals that build upon or toward course offerings, Humanities Labs, or Bass Connections project teams during the regular school year. As possible points of reference, please see the Story+ website for descriptions and outcomes from previous teams. PIs or projects previously supported by Story+ are eligible to apply, but note that priority may be given, in these cases, to projects that demonstrate a significantly new direction or outcome. Individuals are strongly encouraged to consult with Amanda Starling Gould (amanda.gould@duke.edu) about interest and available opportunities.

Project sponsors should plan to be accessible to their teams on at least a weekly basis (in person) and are expected to be regularly available to collaborate with their full team. The most successful and highly-ranked of our projects are those with dedicated sponsors and clearly-articulated goals.

Please submit proposals via Qualtrics, at https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9me5CCfflpkxeYZ by November 4, 2019 at 5:00 p.m.

The Qualtrics application form will ask for the following components:

  • Brief description of the overall project
  • Description of the specific project goal(s) and output(s) you hope to accomplish through Story+. Please include here a basic timeline, project milestones, expected outcome(s), and how/why this work is important to your research/your unit/your organization.
  • Description of how your project aligns with the mission and goals of Story+ to offer a rich humanities research and public storytelling experience for graduates and undergraduates
  • Workplan: this is optional but ideal. This might include a sketch of methods, methodologies, weekly schedule, opportunities for students, campus/community partners who might collaborate, post-Story+ afterlives of the research.
  • List of essential skills undergraduates will need to contribute to the project
  • Do you have a graduate student in mind for the role of your graduate mentor? If you would like us to help match you with a mentor, please list essential skills you would like this person to have.
  • Any funding from external sources or other Duke units that can support the work of the team

For queries about the program and/or to discuss specific project ideas, please email Amanda Starling Gould at amanda.gould@duke.edu. Story+ is funded by Together Duke and administered by the Franklin Humanities Institute in conjunction with Bass Connections, with additional support from the Duke Libraries.

Download a PDF of this call for proposals.

Humanities Research Comes to Life at the Story+ Symposium on June 26

Story+ teams.

All are welcome at the 2019 Story+ Humanities Research Symposium, when Story+ teams will present their final products and/or research works-in-progress.

Story+ is a six-week summer research experience for undergraduates and graduate mentors interested in bringing academic research to life through dynamic storytelling.

This year, ten Story+ teams are unboxing curious artifacts in the Duke archives (including a lock of Walt Whitman’s hair!), uncovering telling facts of social history at Duke and beyond (including its “stained” tobacco pasts), and remixing content into literary exhibitions, environmental podcasts, educational materials, 3D-printed stamps, musical liner notes, and social justice image archives.

Their topics range from asylums to feminisms to 19th-century social media stars, and their products range from podcasts to pedagogical materials. Their methods include textual analysis, visual analysis, archival/historical research, social media research, narrative analysis, cultural analysis, creative work, artistic practice, oral history, writing, and embodied performance.

Story+ symposium.
Wednesday, June 26, 12:00-3:30; lunch starts at 11:45 and program begins at 12:00. Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse, Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University

Story+ is offered through the Franklin Humanities Institute and Bass Connections, with support from the Duke University Libraries and Versatile Humanists at Duke.

Learn more about the teams on the FHI website as well as Instagram (which is taken over by the teams during Story+) at @DukeStoryPlus. Schedule updates will be posted on the FHI Duke Calendar and Facebook event pages.

FHI Seeks Proposals for Story+ Humanities Research Projects

Story+

Deadline: November 5, 2018

About the Program

Story+ is a six-week summer program that immerses interdisciplinary teams of students, faculty, and staff in humanities research and public storytelling. Story+ promotes inquiry-based learning and vertically-integrated collaboration through projects that may be driven by archival research, oral history, textual analysis, visual analysis, cultural criticism, or other humanistic research methods.

Small teams of undergraduates, supervised by graduate student mentors, collaborate on focused projects that contribute to the broader research, teaching, scholarly communications, and/or public engagement agendas of Duke faculty, Duke librarians, nonprofit organizations, and other Duke University or non-University project sponsors.

Story+ final projects have taken the form of writing, exhibits, websites, annotated archives, short films/videos, podcasts, social media content, and other genres.

A typical Story+ team consists of a project sponsor, a graduate student mentor (typically a doctoral student, but MFA or other master’s students may be considered depending on the specific needs of the project), and three undergraduate researchers.

Project sponsors benefit from the opportunity to engage a team of students, who are provided with appropriate guidance and mentoring through Story+, in producing a tangible product that may further their work. Story+ undergraduate students learn how to conduct rigorous interpretive research in a team setting, connect academic knowledge to broader social issues, and communicate their research stories with diverse audiences – within and outside the University – in a complex media environment. Graduate mentors get the distinctive pedagogical and professional opportunity to manage a complex collaborative project, and facilitate the network of relationships that such projects entail.

Each summer, Story+ designs a central curriculum for participating students based on the lineup of projects. An opening boot camp covers basic skills for undergraduate students that apply to all or most teams (e.g., note-taking practices, citation management, relevant digital tools and platforms), and a graduate public humanities workshop will offer advanced training in the digital and public humanities for Story+ graduate mentors. During the six weeks of the program, there will be opportunities to dig deeper into writing, narrative voice, visual storytelling, community engagement, and other important aspects of engaged humanistic scholarship for public audiences.

This is a full-time, Monday to Friday, intensive program for undergraduates. Graduate mentors work 12-15 hours a week, and project sponsors should plan to be accessible to their teams on at least a weekly basis (in-person availability is preferred). The program covers student stipends and provides collaborative work spaces for teams, as well as modest project resources on request (e.g., books, software). Story+ funding can be supplemented by other sources available to the project sponsors, internal or external.

Call for Proposals for Story+ 2019

The Franklin Humanities Institute invites proposals from Duke faculty, archivists, and other campus community members for the Summer 2019 edition of Story+. Up to 10 projects will be selected.

We seek projects of any topic that are anchored in humanities research methods and questions, with well-defined project goals that can be feasibly completed in six weeks. Outcomes of past Story+ teams have ranged from finished products (e.g., a completed curatorial plan for the Spring 2019 Allen Building Takeover 50th anniversary exhibit), prototypes or pilot projects (e.g., the inaugural set of digital teaching modules for Left of Black Enrichment), as well as preliminary, exploratory research that contributes to a larger ongoing project. We encourage proposals that build on or build toward course offerings, Humanities Labs, or Bass Connections project teams during the regular academic year. As possible points of reference, please see our Story+ website for descriptions and outcomes from our first two years (2017 and 2018) of the program.

Please submit proposals via Qualtrics by November 5, 2018 at 5:00 p.m.

Note the new opportunity for faculty to submit a joint proposal for Story+ alongside a year-long Bass Connections project. Contact Laura Howes at laura.howes@duke.edu if you have questions.

The Qualtrics application form will ask for the following components:

Description
  • Brief description of the overall project
  • Description of the specific project goal(s) and output(s) you hope to accomplish through Story+
  • Description of how your project aligns with the mission and goals of Story+ to offer a rich humanities research and public storytelling experience for graduates and undergraduates
  • Description of how your project might expand beyond six weeks of Story+ (you may include grand ideas about pie-in-the-sky project outcomes). Might it develop before Story+ or continue growing after?
Logistics
  • List of essential skills undergraduates will need to contribute to the project
  • Do you have a graduate student in mind for the role of your graduate mentor? Note that any student(s) you list will still need to apply officially. If you would like us to help match you with a mentor, please list essential skills you would like this person to have.
  • Any funding from external sources or other Duke units that can support the work of the team

For queries about the program and/or to discuss specific project ideas, please email Amanda Starling Gould at amanda.gould@duke.edu.

Story+ is funded by Together Duke, with additional support from Versatile Humanists at Duke. Story+ is administered by the Franklin Humanities Institute in conjunction with Bass Connections.

Download the PDF.

Bass Connections Invites Proposals for Interdisciplinary Team-based Research Projects

Bass Connections RFP

Deadline: November 5, 2018

Bass Connections is now accepting proposals for 2019-2020 team-based research projects that engage faculty, undergraduates and graduate/professional students in interdisciplinary exploration of big, unanswered questions about major societal challenges.

Please see the project proposal guidelines. The deadline is November 5 at 5:00 p.m.

Projects may be proposed in relation to one or more of the five broad, interdisciplinary themes of Bass Connections, or to Bass Connections Open – a special channel that invites proposals that align with the model of Bass Connections but otherwise fall outside the parameters of the existing themes.

This is the second, and final, year in which proposals will be accepted through Bass Connections Open. Bass Connections Open is not a permanent feature of the program, but rather an experimental channel that we anticipate opening approximately every five years as a means of identifying percolating areas of interest not addressed by the current themes.

Special Opportunities for 2019-2020

When completing a proposal, faculty will also have the opportunity to take advantage of the following opportunities. Please note that applying for these opportunities will not increase your project budget, but rather may increase the likelihood that your project will be selected by allowing us to leverage funds designated for a specific purpose.

  • Submit a joint proposal for a year-long Bass Connections project and a Summer 2019 Story+ or Data+ project
  • Biodiversity Conservation
  • Energy Access
  • Ethics
  • Arts
  • Humanities

Laura Howes, director of Bass Connections, is available to answer questions. Faculty may also contact any of the Bass Connections theme leaders to discuss project ideas.

Learn More

Story+ Summer Program Seeks Proposals for Humanities Research Projects

Story+

Deadline: November 15, 2017

Story+ is a new six-week summer program in humanities research with a public component, piloted by the Franklin Humanities Institute in Summer 2017 in conjunction with Bass Connections and Versatile Humanists at Duke.

In Story+, small teams of undergraduates collaborate on focused projects that contribute to the broader research, teaching, scholarly communications, and/or public engagement agendas of Duke faculty, Duke librarians, nonprofit organizations, and other project sponsors. Undergraduates work under the day-to-day mentorship of a graduate student in the humanities or interpretive social sciences. Story+ final projects may take the form of writing, exhibits, websites, short films/videos, podcasts, social media content, or other genres.

Story+Project sponsors benefit from the opportunity to engage a team of students, who are provided with appropriate guidance and mentoring, in producing a tangible product that may further their work.

Undergraduate participants will learn to conduct research in the humanities (e.g., archival research, narrative analysis, visual analysis, oral history) and to communicate the results of their research through compelling storytelling techniques.

Graduate mentors get the distinctive pedagogical and professional opportunity to manage a vertically integrated collaborative project, and facilitate the network of relationships that such projects entail. This is a full-time, intensive program for undergraduates. Graduate mentors work 12-15 hours a week. The program covers student stipends and provides collaborative work spaces for teams, as well as modest project resources upon request (e.g., books, software). Story+ funding can be supplemented by other sources available to the project sponsors, internal or external.

In addition, Story+ will design a central curriculum for participating students based on the line-up of projects. An opening boot camp will cover basic skills that apply to all or most teams (e.g., note-taking practices, citation management, relevant digital tools and platforms). During the six weeks of the program, there will be opportunities to dig deeper into writing, narrative voice, visual storytelling, community engagement, and other important aspects of humanistic scholarship for public audience.

We invite proposals from Duke faculty, archivists, and other campus community members for the Summer 2018 Story+ program. Up to eight projects will be selected. We seek projects of any topics that are anchored in humanities research methods and questions, with well-defined end products that can be feasibly completed in six weeks—for example, a website that supplements a scholarly monograph, an exhibit based on an archival collection, a podcast that translates a complex research topic to a general audience, or if more appropriate for the scale of the project, portions of a website, exhibit, or podcast. We also encourage proposals that build upon or build toward course offerings, Humanities Labs, or Bass Connections project teams during the regular school year. As possible points of reference, please see this list of Story+ 2017 participants and final project outcomes and more extensive project descriptions prepared as part of the 2017 graduate and undergraduate call for applications.

Please send two-page proposals to fhi@duke.edu by November 15, 2017. Proposals should include the following components:

  1. Brief description of the overall project
  2. Description of the specific project goal(s) and outputs you hope to accomplish through Story+
  3. List of essential skills undergraduates will need to contribute to this goal
  4. Any funding that from external sources or other Duke units that can support the work of the team.

For queries about the program or to discuss specific project ideas, please email Christina Chia.

There will be an information session for interested applicants on October 30 at 1:00.