Summer 2023 Provost Internships for Duke Ph.D. Students

Summer flowers with view of road, text reading "Summer 2023 provost internships for Ph.D. students, apply now," logo of Duke Office of the Provost.

Deadline: February 20 (priority), rolling through April 20, 2023

The Duke University Provost’s Office, in collaboration with the Office of Durham and Community Affairs, supports professional development opportunities for current Duke Ph.D. students who do not have full summer funding. A number of experiential internships with external organizations are available by application, along with other internship and research assistant opportunities with Duke units across campus.

Interested Ph.D. students should review the opportunities to match both skills/background and research interests. You may apply to a maximum of two positions (this could be two external or two Duke internships, or one of each).

The priority consideration period is through February 20 at 9:00 a.m. Applications received through that time will be processed and shared with internship hosts. Hosts will begin a review of applications by March 2 and may reach out to applicants of interest for interviews. Applications received after the February 20 priority deadline will be considered on a rolling basis through April 20.

All interns will be required to take the experiential workshop, GS950, during Duke Summer Session I or II.

Please see the FAQ section below and contact the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies at ovpis@duke.edu if you have questions.

How to Apply

All applications must be submitted through this Duke portal:

https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/duke_phd_summer_internship

You will be asked to provide the following:

  • Letter of application for each opportunity
  • Brief CV (2-page maximum)
  • Letter of support from your department DGS, indicating how the proposed internship(s) will enhance your intellectual trajectory.

Provost Internships

Browse, search or sort alphabetically by any column. Click on the link in the Internship Focus column to access more information. Please do not contact the host directly.

Organization or Duke UnitInternship FocusBrief Scope of Work
American Historical AssociationResearch & Publications OR Teaching & LearningConduct research on an agreed-upon topic such as research in support of teaching & learning initiatives or with Racist Histories & the AHA initiative
Diaper Bank of NCPeriod & Adult Incontinence Product Distribution ProgramsContribute to process evaluation of DBNC's distribution program for free period products to local public schools; activities include conducting and analyzing key informant interviews with community members involved in the period product distribution; OR Document local retail options for individuals seeking adult incontinence supplies in low-income census tracts; activities include quantitative analysis of community characteristics, mapping or creating other visual representations of local retail options
Duke Bass ConnectionsPedagogical Models for Project-Based LearningHelp design & conduct symposium for higher education administrators on approaches to fostering project-based learning
Duke Center for Computational ThinkingPh.D. Computational FellowshipParticipate in Summer Bootcamp: Introduction to Data Science; give short oral presentation of research question, exploratory data analysis and findings as a final project
Duke Faculty AdvancementEvaluating Excellence in Teaching & MentoringConduct landscape analysis of new approaches to teaching & mentoring effectiveness, to inform faculty tenure & promotion reviews
Duke Forum for Scholars & PublicsPublic Scholarship Community ProgrammingConduct internal & external research to inform strategies for collaborations; develop, promote & manage international online public events
Duke Graduate Liberal StudiesMaster’s Student Capstone Project Experience ModelsDevelop differentiated set of capstone options for Liberal Studies master’s students
Duke North Carolina Leadership ForumPublic Policy: Civic, Business & Political Leaders in Constructive EngagementConduct literature review; collect & analyze data; contribute to two planned writing projects related to NCLF’s founding, mission & impact
Duke Science & Society (AE+)Applied Ethics+ Project TeamsGuide & mentor 2-3 student teams throughout 10-week intensive program for undergraduates; participate in program management & assessment
Duke Social Science Research InstituteEquity & Community-Partnered ResearchDevelop academic manuscript from data analysis & reporting; develop practice-oriented guidance
Duke Social Science Research InstituteMentoring in AIDS Research Training Program for Clinical & Basic Science InvestigatorsHelp evaluate newly implemented programming for AIDS researchers designed to improve mentor/mentee communications within different cultural backgrounds, activities to include data collection, analysis & development of recommendations
Duke Social Science Research InstituteProgram Evaluation & Applied Social Science ResearchInform development of graduate certificate by landscape analysis of similar programs at other institutions
Duke Story+Project-Based Research in Humanities, Arts & Interpretive Social SciencesDevelop structures & best practices for team project management & mentoring for cultivating community across teams; support professional development for program participants; help facilitate symposium
Duke University PressUniversity Press FinancesConduct analyses of book production costs over time and of revenues compared to associated costs, to help inform future directions for publishing program
Durham Arts GuildEducation for NC ArtistsCollect feedback and data from local art community and Durham Art Guild membership base to formulate an accessible and equitable educational program for adult artists with a focus on real world business skills
Durham Arts GuildImpact of the Arts & DAG on DurhamResearch & collect information from Durham Arts Guild's 75 years to determine impact of the organization, & the arts in general, on Durham's growth & commercial development
Durham Technical Community CollegeEducational Programming for First-Generation StudentsAssist in developing targeted programming for first-gen students by researching data methods, best practices & funding support
Durham Technical Community CollegeForeign Language Curriculum & OER DevelopmentHelp develop resources and structures to accommodate a shift to 8-week courses, including development of a web-based open educational resource (OER) textbook (from gathering materials to managing layout/design to platform implementation)
Durham Technical Community CollegeEnglish/Communications Curriculum & OER DevelopmentHelp develop resources and structures to accommodate a shift to 8-week courses, including development of a web-based open educational resource (OER) textbook (from gathering materials to managing layout/design to platform implementation)
Durham Technical Community CollegeSocial Science/Humanities Curriculum & OER DevelopmentHelp develop resources and structures to accommodate a shift to 8-week courses, including development of a web-based open educational resource (OER) textbook (from gathering materials to managing layout/design to platform implementation)
Durham Technical Community CollegeGraphic Design Curricular Program DevelopmentConduct landscape analysis of existing graphic design programs; collaborate with Durham Tech leadership & partners to explore creation of graphic design program for Durham Tech
Durham Technical Community CollegeInterventions for Equity Gaps in Student Success RatesConduct literature review to identify interventions that reduce equity gaps in student success rates; work with instructors to adapt & implement
Justice MattersLiterature Review of Trauma-Informed Legal ServicesConduct a literature review that will examine the public health benefits to providing trauma-informed legal services
Society of St. AndrewHunger & Food Rescue IssuesResearch hunger & food rescue issues to help define impact of SoSA's work & strategize best practices
Triangle Center for Evolutionary MedicineTeam Science & Research AdministrationAssist in developing & delivering educational materials for undergraduates; engage with computational labs & applied field training experiences; plan & facilitate summer programming

FAQ: Summer 2023 Provost Internships

Are master’s students or professional students, including professional doctorates like Th.D. students, eligible to apply for these opportunities?

We are sorry; the internships are only available to Ph.D. students.

I am graduating from Duke with a Ph.D. this spring (or, I am coming to Duke this summer or fall). Am I eligible to apply?

No, only currently enrolled Duke Ph.D. students are eligible. Students who will matriculate in the summer or fall are not eligible.

I already have full summer funding, but one of these positions would be a perfect fit for me. May I still apply?

No, these internships are available only to current Ph.D. students without full summer funding.

I have partial summer funding. Am I still eligible?

Interns may receive other Duke summer funding; however, total Duke summer funding may not exceed $9,000.

I would like to apply to several opportunities. Is this allowed?

You may apply to a maximum of two (2) opportunities (two external, or two internal internships, or one of each).

I’m an international Ph.D. student. May I apply?

Yes, so long as you are residing in one of the U.S. jurisdictions approved for Duke employment: Arizona, Hawaii, Illinois, Montana, Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington, DC. You should consult as soon as possible with Duke Visa Services for assistance with filing applications for Curricular Practical Training and any other visa-related requirements.

I am a Ph.D. student currently in the United States but living outside North Carolina. Can I still apply?

Yes, as long as during the internship you are residing in one of the jurisdictions approved for Duke employment besides North Carolina: Arizona, Hawaii, Illinois, Montana, Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington, DC.

What would a strong application for an internship look like?

Beyond submitting all the required pieces of the application, we recommend giving special attention to the letter of application and brief CV. The application letter should explain how the opportunity would enrich or further develop your academic interests. At the same time, internship hosts are particularly keen to identify the best candidates for the job at hand. Help the readers understand how you are well qualified for the position, and give some sense of what distinctive contributions you can make to the position and the organization or Duke unit.

How do I abridge my CV to two pages?

Only include the most important information from your longer CV (key elements of your scholarship; your most important fellowships and teaching assignments; etc.). Highlight details that best demonstrate your qualifications for the position. As an example, for a research-intensive position, you should include evidence of your skills in research and writing, such as publications. For other positions, you may want to offer more information about your experience with collaborative projects, website development and relevant nonacademic work.

How will candidates be evaluated and selected?

You will apply through this Duke portal. Complete applications that are well suited to the positions will be forwarded to the internship hosts. Hosts may or may not reach out to candidates for virtual interviews, which may happen on very short notice. Hosts will make the final decision on candidate selection, but notification letters will come from the Provost’s Office. If you wish to check up on your application status or have questions, please contact the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies (ovpis@duke.edu). Please do not contact the host directly.

What is the timeline for these opportunities?

Hosts will begin review of applications received through the priority deadline of February 20 by March 2.  Hosts will then consider additional applications on a rolling basis until April 20, 2023. They should make their decisions by that date. We ask all students to expeditiously confirm their acceptance/decline of offers. Internships will begin no earlier than May 15 and will end no later than August 18, 2023.

When will the internship take place? How many service hours are expected?

Internships may involve six weeks, eight weeks or twelve weeks of engagement, and must take place between May 15 – August 18, 2023 with no more than 19.9 hours/week, leaving time for students to engage with their own research, study and/or writing.

All internship opportunities listed are configured in one of the following formats:

  • Three months (12 weeks, 19.9 hours/week)
  • Two months (8 weeks, 19.9 hours/week)
  • One and a half months (6 weeks/19.9 hours/week)
How much will I be paid for the internship, and how will I be paid?

You will receive a stipend commensurate with the three options for length of engagement:

  • Three months: $8,415
  • Two months: $5,610
  • One and a half months: $4,207.50

Stipends will be paid across Duke’s June – August payroll cycles. Your summer tuition will be covered, and your department will also receive the summer health fee.

I am not eligible to apply, but I would love to collaborate with one of these external organizations in some way. How can I reach out?

This is not the time to reach out unless you’re eligible to fill the organization’s posted position. Please consider contacting Maria Wisdom, director of interdisciplinary mentoring and coaching programs, to discuss a long-term networking strategy.

I will be traveling during the summer. Am I still eligible for an internship?

Though brief travel outside the internship jurisdiction is permitted, you need to be physically residing in the jurisdiction approved for Duke employment for the duration of the internship to be eligible for the opportunity. International students should confirm their visa/residency status with Duke Visa Services.

I am available for less time than the full duration of the internships to which I am applying (e.g., 8 weeks instead of 12 weeks). Will I still be considered?

Your application will still be sent to the host for consideration. Your limited availability may affect selection if timing is important to the host, though you may be able to negotiate timing for the internship if selected for an interview.

I am planning to teach a course in one of Duke’s Summer Sessions. Am I still eligible for an internship?

You are not eligible for an internship if you are teaching a Summer Session course. When offered an internship, you will be required to make a choice — to move forward with plans to teach the course or to cancel the course in order to pursue the internship opportunity. The timing around this decision may be tight (a few days) so it is important to consider your preferences in advance.

Support for Duke Units to Host Ph.D. Student Internships in Summer 2023

Photo of a stone archway on Duke's campus, with graphic of the Together Duke logo. Text: Request for Proposals. Ph.D. Student Summer Internships Hosted by Duke Units.

Deadline: January 12, 2023

Overview

During Summer 2023, the Provost’s Office will support professional development opportunities for current Duke Ph.D. students who do not have full summer funding. Units that would like to host such an opportunity may submit a proposal by January 12, 2023. Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/phd_internship_duke).

RFP released  12/12/22
RFP deadline for submission  1/12/23 at 5:00 p.m.
Anticipated unit/program notification  1/17/23
Anticipated student application period  1/23/23 – 4/20/23
Anticipated priority application/selection period (rolling consideration thereafter)  2/20/23 – 4/20/23
Internship start/end  5/16/23 – 8/19/23

We are seeking Ph.D. student internships opportunities that align with Together Duke and will provide Ph.D. students with research experience connected to their intellectual trajectory. Examples from past years:

  • A Duke Forest student intern assessed emerging risks to the Forest
  • Duke University Press hosted two student interns who worked on an innovation team that explored digital strategies for authors to engage with readers during the pandemic
  • The Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine had a student intern assist with development of curricular materials for K-12 schools
  • A student intern with the Modern Language Association designed and marketed a resource toolkit around curricular innovation and teacher training.

Restrictions and Parameters

  • These opportunities will only be open to current Ph.D. students without full summer funding. Students who will matriculate in the summer or fall of 2023 are not eligible.
  • Interested students will apply for posted opportunities through a central Duke portal, though the selection process and decision will rest with each internship host.
  • Internships may involve six weeks, eight weeks or twelve weeks of engagement, and must take place between May 16 – August 19, 2023 with no more than 19.9 hours/week, leaving time for students to engage with their own research, study and/or writing.
  • The earliest date an internship may start is May 16, 2023; the latest an internship may end is August 19, 2023.
  • Ph.D. students must receive a stipend commensurate with the three options for length of engagement, plus summer health fee and fringe, paid across the June – August payroll cycles. Interns may receive other Duke summer funding; however, total Duke summer funding may not exceed $8,915. The school of any selected student will be responsible for the provision of summer tuition scholarships.
  • Any proposal for an internship must comply with Duke University coronavirus response policies and the residency requirement detailed below.
  • Internship hosts must be based in an approved U.S. jurisdiction available for Duke employment: Arizona, Hawaii, Illinois, Montana, Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington, DC. Student applicants must also reside in one of these approved U.S. jurisdictions.
  • International Ph.D. students who reside in an approved U.S. jurisdiction should consult as soon as possible with Duke Visa Services for assistance with filing applications for Curricular Practical Training and any other visa-related requirements.
  • All student interns will be required to take the experiential workshop, GS950, during Duke Summer Session I or II.

Eligibility

  • Proposals should be submitted by the head of a unit (dean, director, chair, etc.).
  • Units must provide 50% of the stipend and fringes.

Selection Criteria and Review Process

Host units and supervisors must detail a program of work, with clear goals, deliverables and identification of a supervisor, in their proposed job description. We encourage host units to plan for regular interaction with interns and to include them in team meetings. The review process will be overseen by the vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Scope and Duration

In-person, remote and/or hybrid internships will be considered. The proposed internship experience should last for up to three months in the summer and proposals may be configured in one of the following formats:

  1. Three-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $8,415 as well as coverage of summer tuition and health fee
  2. Two-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $5,610 as well as coverage of summer tuition and health fee
  3. One and a half month/6-week internship (19.9 hours/week); intern will receive a stipend of $4,207.50 as well as coverage of summer tuition and health fee

The proposed internship will take place between May 16 – August 19, 2023, and interns will receive a stipend as well as coverage of summer tuition and the summer health fee across the June – August payroll cycles.

Proposal Requirements

Proposals will be accepted via Formstack: (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/phd_internship_duke).

You will be asked to provide the following information:

  • A title and brief description (one paragraph) for your proposed internship position
  • The number of interns your unit anticipates hosting
  • The start and end dates for the internship
  • The name and contact information for your unit business manager
  • The name and contact information for the internship coordinator and the direct supervisor (if different)
  • A brief plan (maximum one page) that articulates the anticipated project or projects, describes the nature of engagement with organizational staff members, and (if relevant) specifies how the organization envisages a remote/virtual work experience
  • Confirmation that the unit will provide 50% of the stipend and associated fringe.

Contact

For questions related to the online application and/or other logistical questions, please contact the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies at ovpis@duke.edu.

For questions related to internship work plans or financial support toward internship stipends, please contact Edward J. Balleisen at eballeis@duke.edu.

Organizations Can Get Support to Host Duke Ph.D. Student Interns

Host a Duke University Ph.D. Student Intern This Text: External organizations: Host a Duke Ph.D. Intern This Summer. Proposals due December 7, 2022. Graphic over photo of stone gate with sign reading Duke University.

Deadline: December 7, 2022

Overview

The Duke Provost’s Office in collaboration with the Office of Durham and Community Affairs will support professional development opportunities for current Duke Ph.D. students who do not have full summer funding. Organizations that would like to host such an opportunity may submit a proposal by December 7, at 5:00 p.m.

RFP released 11/7/22
RFP deadline for submission 12/7/22 at 5:00 p.m.
Internship host notification 1/10/23
Student application period 1/23/23 9:00 a.m. – 4/20/23 5:00 p.m.
Priority consideration period (all applications received prior to 2/20/22 will be given priority consideration; applications received thereafter will be reviewed on a rolling basis) 2/20/23 9:00 a.m. – 3/1/23 5:00 p.m.
Student placement notification 3/6/23
Internship dates Mid-May through mid-August

We are seeking internships opportunities that provide Ph.D. students with research experience outside the university while remaining connected to their intellectual trajectory. To cite a few examples, in past years, Duke Ph.D. interns have engaged with:

  • The Modern Language Association to design and marketed a resource toolkit around curricular innovation and teacher training
  • Governance and Youth Economic Opportunities group at RTI International to deploy social network analysis (SNA) to facilitate international development projects, create user-friendly SNA guides and reports, and contribute to workshops and a community of practice event
  • The Consumer Protection Division of the North Carolina Attorney General’s Office to analyze regulatory developments in the European Union and report on findings to representatives of attorney general offices in other states

Restrictions and Parameters for Student Interns

  • These opportunities will only be open to current Duke Ph.D. students without full summer funding. Students who will matriculate in the summer or fall are not eligible.
  • Interested students will apply for posted opportunities through a central Duke portal, though the selection process and placement decision will rest with each internship host.
  • Internships may involve six weeks, eight weeks or twelve weeks of engagement, and must take place between May 15 – August 18, 2023 with no more than 19.9 hours/week, leaving time for students to engage with their own research, study and/or writing.
  • The earliest date an internship may start is May 15, 2023; the latest an internship may end is August 18, 2023.
  • Duke Ph.D. students will receive a stipend commensurate with the duration of engagement; stipends will be paid across Duke’s June – August payroll cycles.
  • International students who reside in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction detailed below should consult as soon as possible with Duke Visa Services for assistance with filing applications for Curricular Practical Training and any other visa-related requirements.

Restrictions and Parameters for Host Organizations

  • Proposals from host organizations that can provide 50% of the total stipend amount or receive Duke Office of Durham and Community Affairs stipend support (see below) will be given priority consideration. Where relevant, organizations will be invoiced in September for the stipend amount.
Internship Duration Host Support (50% of Stipend)
Three months/12 weeks (19.9 hours/week) $4,207.50
Two months/8 weeks (19.9 hours/week) $2,805.00
One and a half months/6 weeks (19.9 hours/week) $2,103.75
  • In an effort to support community partners unable to fund internships, regional nonprofit organizations may request assistance through the Duke Office of Durham and Community Affairs. To be eligible, organizations must serve the regional community in one of Duke’s five strategic focus areas:
    • Community/nonprofit capacity
    • Housing affordability and infrastructure
    • Early childhood education and K-12 readiness
    • College and career readiness
    • Community health/food security and nutrition
  • Organizations requesting stipend assistance may inquire with Sandra Martinez Zuniga, senior program coordinator for civic engagement at the Office of Durham and Community Affairs.
  • Any proposal for an internship must comply with Duke University coronavirus response policies and the residency requirement detailed below.
  • Internship hosts must be based in an approved U.S. jurisdiction available for Duke employment: Arizona, Hawaii, Illinois, Montana, Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington, DC.

Selection Criteria and Review Process

Host organizations and supervisors must detail a program of work, with clear goals, deliverables and identification of a supervisor, in their proposed job description. We encourage host organizations to plan for regular interaction with interns and to include them in team meetings. The review process will be overseen by the Duke vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Scope and Duration

In-person, remote and/or hybrid internships will be considered. The proposed internship experience should last for up to three months in the summer and proposals may be configured in one of the following formats. The proposed internship will take place between May 15 – August 18, 2023.

Internship Duration

Student Stipend

Three months/12 weeks (19.9 hours/week) $8,415.00
Two months/8 weeks (19.9 hours/week) $5,610.00
One and a half months/6 weeks (19.9 hours/week) $4,207.50

Proposal Requirements

Proposals from prospective internship hosts will be accepted via Formstack.

You will be asked to provide the following information:

  • A title and brief description (one paragraph) for the proposed internship position
  • The number of interns your organization anticipates hosting
  • The start and end dates for the internship
  • The name and contact information for the organization/unit business manager
  • The name and contact information for the internship coordinator and the direct supervisor (if different)
  • Confirmation of the internship duration, including start and end dates
  • A brief plan (maximum one page) that articulates the anticipated project or projects, describes the nature of engagement with organizational staff members, and specifies how the organization envisages a remote/virtual work experience (if relevant)
  • A confirmation of stipend support, or explanation of why stipend support is not possible

Contact

For questions related to the online application and/or other logistical questions, please contact the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies.

Organizations based in the Triangle are encouraged to contact Sandra Martinez Zuniga, senior program coordinator for civic engagement at the Office of Durham and Community Affairs, especially if they wish to explore stipend assistance.

For questions related to internship work plans or stipend support, please contact Edward J. Balleisen, vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Provost Internships Awarded to Ph.D. Students for Wide Range of Summer Research Experiences

Photos of 19 Ph.D. student grantees.
Top row: Mohammed Ali, Blake Beaver, James Chu, Rebecca Cook, Devin Cornell, Nova Déjardin; middle row: Natasza Gawlick, Nikolai Hay, Chloe Kaczmarek, Sinja Kuppers, Catherine Ji Won Lee, Botian Liu, Michael McGurk; bottom row: Joseph Ren, Elizabeth Schrader, Lorenza Starace, Nathan Tilley, Christopher Webb, Luoshu Zhang

Nineteen Duke University Ph.D. students have received Provost Internships for Summer 2022. These students will partner with Duke units and external organizations on research projects connected to their intellectual trajectories.

The recipients will be provided with a stipend as well as coverage of summer tuition and the summer health fee. They will also take part in an experiential learning workshop taught by Maria Wisdom or Rachel Coleman, or a relevant Duke Graduate Academy course.

Summer 2022 Provost Internships


Mohammed Ali, Ph.D. in History

Research and Publications, American Historical Association

Blake Beaver, Ph.D. in Literature

Preparation of Scholarly Work for Digital Projects, National Humanities Center

James Chu, Ph.D. in Music

Curriculum Development, Duke Curriculum Development Committee

Rebecca Cook, Ph.D. in Evolutionary Anthropology

Evolutionary Medicine Summer Programs Coordination, Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine

Devin Cornell, Ph.D. in Sociology

Data Analysis of Transfer Students, Creative and Liberal Arts, Durham Technical Community College

Nova Déjardin, Ph.D. in History

Humanities and Climate Communications, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University

Natasza Gawlick, Ph.D. in German Studies

Preparation of Scholarly Work for Digital Projects, National Humanities Center

Nikolai Hay, Ph.D. in Biology

Governance and Land Use, Duke Forest

Chloe Kaczmarek, Ph.D. in Romance Studies

Oral History, Historical Division, Duke Divinity School

Sinja Kuppers, Ph.D. in Classical Studies

Curriculum Development, Duke Curriculum Development Committee

Catherine Ji Won Lee, Ph.D. in English

Pedagogical Best Practices for College-Level Synchronous Online Instruction, Creative and Liberal Arts, Durham Technical Community College

Botian Liu, Ph.D. in Philosophy

Research and Grant Writing, The Purpose Project, Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University

Michael McGurk, Ph.D. in English

Preparation of Books for Publishing, Duke University Press

Joseph Ren, Ph.D. in Literature

Preparation of Books for Publishing, Duke University Press, and Qualitative Diversity and Inclusion Research, Duke Public Affairs & Government Relations

Elizabeth Schrader, Ph.D. in Religion

Curriculum Development, Duke Curriculum Development Committee

Lorenza Starace, Ph.D. in Romance Studies

Language Pedagogy for Undergraduate Education, Duke Department of Romance Studies

Nathan Tilley, Ph.D. in Religion

Oral History, Historical Division, Duke Divinity School

Christopher Webb, Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology

Evaluation of COVID-19 Relief Solutions, Duke Social Science Research Institute

Luoshu Zhang, Ph.D. in English

American Literature Research for Curriculum Diversification, Creative and Liberal Arts, Durham Technical Community College


More Ph.D. Resources

Duke Ph.D. Student Internship Opportunities for Summer 2022

Summer 2022 Provost Internships for Duke Ph.D. Students. Apply now.

Deadline: March 20 (priority), rolling through April 29, 2022

Duke’s Office of the Provost is offering a broad set of opportunities to support Ph.D. students during Summer 2022. A number of experiential internships with external organizations are available by application, along with other internship and research assistant opportunities with Duke units across campus.

Interested Ph.D. students should search the opportunities to match both skills/background and research interests. You may apply to only two (2) positions (this could be two external or two Duke internships, or one of each).

The priority deadline is March 20. Hosts will begin review of applications on March 21, and then consider additional applications on a rolling basis through April 29.

All interns will be required to take either the experiential workshop, GS950, or a relevant Duke Graduate Academy course, during Duke Summer Session I or II.

Please see the FAQ section below, and contact Amy Feistel (amy.feistel@duke.edu) with any questions.

How to Apply

All applications must be submitted through this Duke portal: https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/duke_phd_summer_internship

You will be asked to provide the following:

  • Letter of application for each opportunity
  • Brief CV (2-page maximum)
  • Letter of support from your department DGS, indicating how the proposed internship(s) will enhance your intellectual trajectory.

Provost Internships

Browse, search or sort alphabetically by any column. Click on the link in the Internship Focus column to access more information.

Organization or Duke UnitInternship FocusBrief Scope of Work
American Historical AssociationFILLED: Research & PublicationsWork with the Perspectives on History editorial team, write article(s), work on Racist Histories and the AHA project
Central Park School for ChildrenAnti-Racist Curriculum & Pedagogy DevelopmentWork with school’s equity coach to design, distribute and implement culturally responsive lessons and curriculum for K-8, and professional development for staff to support pedagogical practices
Don’t Waste DurhamEnvironmental Equity & Social JusticeFinalize ReCirculation Project design based on pre-pilot survey data, develop and finalize data collection tools, conduct monitoring and evaluation, report on results, draw conclusions
Duke Bass ConnectionsFILLED: Analysis of Interdisciplinary Research & LearningConduct landscape analysis of analogous interdisciplinary research and education programs, draft publications to share lessons learned from Bass Connections model with other institutions, help design symposium on interdisciplinary and collaborative learning
Duke Career ServicesAlumni EngagementDevelop and execute a plan to engage graduate alumni and local/regional employers about expanding and deepening experiential learning opportunities for Duke Ph.D. students; catalog known Ph.D. internship opportunities with Triangle area companies
Duke Center for Computational ThinkingFILLED: Ph.D. Computational FellowshipParticipate in Summer Bootcamp: Introduction to Data Science; give short oral presentation of research question, exploratory data analysis and findings as a final project
Duke Clinical & Translational Science Institute, Center for Equity in ResearchEquity in ResearchCollaborate with center’s team members on expanding six key focus areas; gather and organize evidenced-based practices; collaborate on design or improvement of trainings and workshops
Duke Curriculum Development CommitteeFILLED: Undergraduate Curriculum DevelopmentCollect scholarly research, work with data on curriculum and students’ paths, identify and summarize peer curricula, perform other research activities
Duke Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine (TriCEM)FILLED: Evolutionary Medicine Summer Programs CoordinationAssist in planning, facilitating and contributing to TriCEM’s summer programming including educational workshops, other trainings, science communication, and working group meetings to advance research
Duke Department of Romance StudiesFILLED: Language Pedagogy for Undergraduate EducationWork on research and development for set of best practices for Multilingual Writing Center, research parallel structures in English, examine literature writing pedagogy in different languages, collaborate with language program directors and faculty to understand student and faculty needs
Duke Divinity SchoolFILLED: Oral History ProjectPartake in interview training and practice, conduct background research on the school’s history of, interview former faculty
Duke ForestFILLED: Governance and Land UseAssess governance and land use contexts surrounding the Duke Forest Teaching and Research Laboratory, identify potential threats, vulnerabilities and risks to mission, management objectives and strategic vision
Duke Initiative for Science & SocietyScience Communication CurriculumCreate strategic scoping document of SciComm trainings from Duke, other universities and private sector; identify best practices and ethical issues; identify/develop assessment tools to determine effectiveness; conduct assessment Duke SciComm offerings; begin development of curriculum design
Duke John Hope Franklin Humanities InstituteFILLED: Humanities & Climate CommunicationsConceptualize and generate faculty/student interviews, profiles of research projects and collaborations, or other content; generate materials for campus communications and for FHI annual report
Duke Kenan Institute for EthicsFILLED: Research & Grant Proposal WritingResearch and draft grant proposal on developing and evaluating programs that integrate questions of meaning, purpose and character into undergraduate and graduate/professional education
Duke Public Affairs & Government RelationsFILLED: Qualitative Diversity & Inclusion ResearchAssess Duke communicators’ experience related to anti-racism, diversity, equity and inclusion using survey data; conduct focus group(s); prepare report with analysis and recommendations regarding current environment, culture and challenges
Duke Social Science Research InstituteFILLED: Evaluation of COVID-19 Relief SolutionsConduct community-partnered research and evaluation efforts based in SSRI; perform qualitative data collection exploring implementation to address COVID-related educational needs and inequities
Duke University PressFILLED: Preparation of Books for PublishingFormat manuscripts, organize art program for books, write book summaries to be presented to Editorial Advisory Board, help with other pre-production tasks
Durham Technical Community CollegeFILLED: American Literature Research for Curriculum DiversificationHelp diversify curriculum for key courses; connect with existing faculty and resources; research work from underrepresented communities in American literature; create course content
Durham Technical Community CollegeFILLED: Data Analysis of Transfer StudentsCollect and analyze data concerning key metrics for university transfer students; examine measures involving student success in key English and Math gateway courses as well as those that concern curriculum completion and equitable outcomes for students
Durham Technical Community CollegeEquity Gap ResearchWork with instructors to identify social factors affecting students, review literature to find promising interventions to support students, adapt intervention for first-year composition class
Durham Technical Community CollegeFILLED: Pedagogical Best Practices for Online InstructionConduct literature review concerning pedagogical best practices for synchronous online instruction as they are applied to college-level general education courses; help design and develop faculty training
Hope RenovationsMarket AnalysisPerform market analysis and offerings recommendations, including pricing; produce implementation plan, including marketing recommendations
JusticeMattersCommunity Health/Food Security & NutritionBuild knowledge around legal services and remedies, complete literature review, give presentation to leadership team and board members
MDCFILLED: Equity & Prosperity in the SouthDevelop data profiles that provide indicators of current state of equity and prosperity across the South; contribute to qualitative design, implementation and analysis of discussions that occur at community convenings
National Humanities CenterFILLED: Preparation of Scholarly Work for Digital ProjectCurate, frame, produce and translate scholarly work for new digital project, Humanities Town Square; work with digital and narrative content and platforms, engage partners and contribute to design and editorial framework
North Carolina Department of Justice, Consumer Protection DivisionExploration of Antitrust RemediesExplore interoperability, data portability and/or data sharing as potential antitrust remedies; analyze privacy issues such as use of data in advertising, anonymization of data and differential privacy in relation to remedies
RTI InternationalDiversity & Community EngagementSynthesize information to inform prototype development; analyze qualitative data generated from design sprints; contribute to digital strategy related to engagement experiences for health care providers and diverse community members
RTI InternationalGlobal Noncommunicable DiseasesInterpret data on performance of NCD screening and treatment programs, research disease burden, policy and health economics related to NCDs, prepare summaries of research findings

FAQ: Summer 2022 Provost Internships

Are master’s students or professional students, including professional doctorates like Th.D. students, eligible to apply for these opportunities?

We are sorry; the internships are only available to Ph.D. students.

I am graduating from Duke with a Ph.D. this spring. Am I eligible to apply for one of these opportunities?

No, only currently enrolled Duke Ph.D. students are eligible.

I already have full summer funding, but one of these positions would be a perfect fit for me. May I still apply?

No, these internships are available only to current Ph.D. students without full summer funding.

I have partial summer funding. Am I still eligible?

Interns may receive other Duke summer funding; however, total Duke summer funding may not exceed $8,750.

I would like to apply to several opportunities. Is this allowed?

No, you may only apply to two (2) opportunities (two external or two internal internships, or one of each).

I’m an international Ph.D. student. May I apply?

Yes, so long as you are residing in one of the U.S. jurisdictions approved for Duke employment: North Carolina, District of Columbia, California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia. You also need to verify your visa status and confirm your eligibility for this funding opportunity with Duke Visa Services before applying.

I am a Ph.D. student currently in the United States but living outside North Carolina. Can I still apply?

Yes, as long as during the internship you are residing in one of the jurisdictions approved for Duke employment besides North Carolina: District of Columbia, California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia.

What would a strong application for an internship look like?

Beyond submitting all the required pieces of the application, we recommend giving special attention to the letter of application and brief CV. The application  letter should explain how the opportunity would enrich or further develop your academic interests. At the same time, internship hosts are particularly keen to identify the best candidates for the job at hand. Help the readers understand how you are well qualified for the position, and give some sense of what unique contributions you can make to the position and the organization or Duke unit.

How do I abridge my CV to two pages?

Only include the most important information from your longer CV (key elements of your scholarship; your most important fellowships and teaching assignments; etc.). Highlight details that best demonstrate your qualifications for the position. As an example, for a research-intensive position, you should include evidence of your skills in research and writing, such as publications. For other positions, you may want to offer more information about your experience with collaborative projects, website development and relevant nonacademic work.

How will candidates be evaluated and selected?

You will apply through this Duke portal. Complete applications that are well suited to the positions will be forwarded to the internship hosts. Hosts may or may not reach out to candidates for virtual interviews, which may happen on very short notice. Hosts will make the final decision on candidate selection, but notification letters will come from the Provost’s Office. If you wish to check up on your application status or have questions, please contact Amy Feistel (amy.feistel@duke.edu). Please do not contact the host directly.

What is the timeline for these opportunities?

Hosts will begin review of applications on March 21, and then consider additional applications on a rolling basis until April 29, 2022. They should make their decisions by that date. We ask all students to expeditiously confirm their acceptance/decline of offers. Internships will begin no earlier than May 16, 2022 and will end no later than August 19, 2022.

When will the internship take place? How many service hours are expected?

Internships will begin no earlier than May 16, 2022 and will end no later than August 19, 2022. All internship opportunities listed are configured in one of the following formats:

  • Three months (12 weeks, 19.9 hours/week)
  • Two months (8 weeks, 19.9 hours/week)
  • One and a half months (6 weeks/19.9 hours/week)
How much will I be paid for the internship, and how will I be paid?

You will receive a stipend commensurate with the three options for length of engagement:

  • Three months: $8,250
  • Two months: $5,500
  • One and a half months: $4,125

You will receive your stipend through your department payroll, June – August, 2022. Your summer tuition will be covered, and your department will also receive the summer health fee.

I am not eligible to apply, but I would love to collaborate with one of these external organizations in some way. How can I reach out?

This is not the time to reach out unless you’re eligible to fill the organization’s posted position. Please consider contacting Maria Wisdom, director of interdisciplinary mentoring and coaching programs, to discuss a long-term networking strategy.

I will be traveling during the summer. Am I still eligible for an internship?

Though brief travel outside the internship jurisdiction is permitted, you need to be physically residing in the jurisdiction approved for Duke employment for the duration of the internship to be eligible for the opportunity. International students should confirm their visa/residency status with Duke Visa Services.

I am available for less time than the full duration of the internships to which I am applying (e.g., I am only available for 8 weeks instead of 12 weeks). Will I still be considered for selection?

Your application will still be sent to the host for consideration. Your limited availability may affect selection if timing is important to the host, though you may be able to negotiate timing for the internship if selected for an interview.

I am planning to teach a course in one of Duke’s Summer Sessions. Am I still eligible for an internship?

You are not eligible for an internship if you are teaching a Summer Session course. When offered an internship, you will be required to make a choice — to move forward with plans to teach the course or to cancel the course in order to pursue the internship opportunity. The timing around this decision may be tight (a few days) so it is important to consider your preferences in advance.

Support for External Organizations to Host Duke Ph.D. Student Summer Internships

View of Duke campus.

Deadline: February 4, 2022

Overview

During Summer 2022, the Duke University Provost’s Office in collaboration with the Office of Durham and Community Affairs will support professional development opportunities for current Duke Ph.D. students who do not have full summer funding. Organizations that would like to host such an opportunity may submit a proposal by February 4, 2022. Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/duke_phd_internships_external).

We are seeking Ph.D. student internships opportunities that provide Ph.D. students with research experience outside the university while remaining connected to their intellectual trajectory. To cite a few examples, in past years, Duke Ph.D. interns have engaged with:

  • The Modern Language Association to design and marketed a resource toolkit around curricular innovation and teacher training
  • Governance and Youth Economic Opportunities group at RTI International to deploy social network analysis (SNA) to facilitate international development projects, create user-friendly SNA guides and reports, and contribute to workshops and a community of practice event
  • The Consumer Protection Division of the North Carolina Attorney General’s Office to analyze regulatory developments in the European Union and report on findings to representatives from offices of Attorneys General in other states
RFP released 1/11/22
RFP deadline for submission 2/4/22 at 5:00 p.m.
Anticipated organization notification 2/11/22
Anticipated student application period 2/18 – 3/20/22
Anticipated priority application/selection period (rolling consideration thereafter) 3/21 – 3/25/22
Internship start/end 5/16 – 8/19/22

Restrictions and Parameters for Students

  • These opportunities will only be open to current Duke Ph.D. students without full summer funding. Students who will matriculate in the summer/fall of 2022 are not eligible.
  • Interested students will apply for posted opportunities through a central Duke portal, though the selection process and decision will rest with each internship host.
  • Internships can involve six weeks, eight weeks or twelve weeks of engagement, and must take place between May 16 – August 19 with no more than 19.9 hours/week, leaving time for students to engage with their own research, study and/or writing. Stipend amounts vary by the amount of time required.
  • The earliest date an internship may start is May 16, 2022; the latest an internship may end is August 19, 2022.
  • Duke Ph.D. students will receive a stipend commensurate with the three options for length of engagement paid across Duke’s June – August payroll cycles.
  • International Duke Ph.D. students who reside in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction detailed below and who wish to apply for a summer internship should consult as soon as possible with Duke Visa Services for assistance with filing applications for Curricular Practical Training and any other visa-related requirements.

Restrictions and Parameters for Host Organizations

  • Proposals from host organizations that can provide a 50% cost share on the stipend or receive Duke Office of Durham and Community Affairs stipend support (see below) will be given priority consideration. Where relevant, organizations will be invoiced in September 2022 for the stipend cost share.
Internship Duration

Stipend

Host 50% Cost Share

Three-month (19.9 hours/week)

$8,250

$4,125

Two-month (19.9 hours/week)

$5,500

$2,750

One and a half month/6-week (19.9 hours/week)

$4,125

$2,062.50

  • In an effort to support community partners unable to fund internships, regional nonprofit organizations may request support through the Duke Office of Durham and Community Affairs. To be eligible for stipend funding support, organizations must serve the regional community in one of Duke’s five strategic focus areas:
    • Community/nonprofit capacity
    • Housing affordability and infrastructure
    • Early childhood education and K-12 readiness
    • College and career readiness
    • Community health/food security and nutrition
  • Organizations requesting stipend assistance may inquire with Sandra Martinez Zuniga, sandra.martinezzuniga@duke.edu, senior program coordinator for civic engagement at the Office of Durham and Community Affairs.
  • Internship hosts must either be based in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction available for Duke employment: California, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

Selection Criteria and Review Process

Host organizations and supervisors must detail a program of work, with clear goals, deliverables, and identification of a supervisor, in their proposed job description. We encourage host organizations to plan for regular interaction with interns and to include them in team meetings. The review process will be overseen by the Duke vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Scope and Duration

In-person, remote and/or hybrid internships will be considered. The proposed internship experience should last for up to three months in the summer and proposals may be configured in one of the following formats:

  1. Three-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $8,250
  2. Two-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $5,500
  3. One and a half month/6-week internship (19.9 hours/week); intern will receive a stipend of $4,125

The proposed internship will take place between May 16 – August 19, 2022 and interns will receive a stipend paid across Duke’s June – August payroll cycles.

Proposal Requirements

Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/duke_phd_internships_external) through February 4, 2022 at 5 p.m.

You will be asked to provide the following information:

  • A title and brief description (one paragraph) for the proposed internship position
  • The number of interns your organization anticipates hosting
  • The start and end dates for the internship
  • The name and contact information for the organization/unit business manager
  • The name and contact information for the internship coordinator and the direct supervisor (if different)
  • A brief plan (maximum one page) that articulates the anticipated project or projects, describes the nature of engagement with organizational staff members, and specifies how the organization envisages a remote/virtual work experience (if relevant)
  • A confirmation of cost share, or explanation of why cost share is not possible

Contact

For questions related to the online application and/or other logistical questions, please contact Amy Feistel, amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Organizations based in the Triangle are encouraged to contact Sandra Martinez Zuniga, sandra.martinezzuniga@duke.edu, senior program coordinator for civic engagement at the Office of Durham and Community Affairs, especially if they wish to explore stipend coverage.

For questions related to internship work plans or cost sharing, please contact Edward J. Balleisen, eballeis@duke.edu, vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Support for Duke Units to Host Ph.D. Student Internships in Summer 2022

Request for proposals.

Deadline: January 28, 2022

Overview

During Summer 2022, the Provost’s Office will support professional development opportunities for current Duke Ph.D. students who do not have full summer funding. Units that would like to host such an opportunity may submit a proposal by January 28, 2022. Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/phd_internships_duke).

We are seeking Ph.D. student internship opportunities that align with Together Duke and will provide Ph.D. students with research experience connected to their intellectual trajectory. Examples from past years:

  • A Duke Forest intern assessed emerging risks to the Forest
  • Duke University Press hosted two interns who worked on an innovation team that explored digital strategies for authors to engage with readers during the pandemic
  • The Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine had an intern assist with development of curricular materials for K-12 schools
  • An intern with the Modern Language Association designed and marketed a resource toolkit around curricular innovation and teacher training.
RFP released 1/7/22
RFP deadline for submission 1/28/22 at 5:00 p.m.
Anticipated unit/program notification 2/4/22
Anticipated student application period 2/18/22 – 3/20/22
Anticipated priority application/selection period (rolling consideration thereafter) 3/21/22 – 3/25/22
Internship start/end 5/16/22 – 8/19/22

Restrictions and Parameters

  • These opportunities will only be open to current Ph.D. students without full summer funding. Students who will matriculate in the summer/fall of 2022 are not eligible.
  • Interested students will apply for posted opportunities through a central Duke portal, though the selection process and decision will rest with each internship host.
  • Internships can involve six weeks, eight weeks or twelve weeks of engagement, and must take place between May 16 – August 19 with no more than 19.9 hours/week, leaving time for students to engage with their own research, study and/or writing. Stipend amounts vary by the amount of time required.
  • The earliest date an internship may start is May 16, 2022; the latest an internship may end is August 19, 2022.
  • Ph.D. students must receive a stipend commensurate with the three options for length of engagement, plus summer health fee and fringe, paid across the June – August payroll cycles. Interns may receive other Duke summer funding; however, total Duke summer funding may not exceed $8,750. The school of any selected student will be responsible for the provision of summer tuition scholarships.
  • Any proposal for an internship must comply with Duke University coronavirus response policies and the residency requirement detailed below.
  • International Ph.D. students who reside in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction detailed below and who wish to apply for a summer internship should consult as soon as possible with Duke Visa Services for assistance with filing applications for Curricular Practical Training and any other visa-related requirements.
  • Internship hosts must either be based in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction available for Duke employment: California, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.
  • All student interns will be required to take the experiential workshop, GS950, during Duke Summer Session I or II.

Eligibility

  • Proposals should be submitted by the head of a unit (dean, director, chair, etc.).
  • Units must provide a 50% cost share on the stipend and fringes.

Selection Criteria and Review Process

Host units and supervisors must detail a program of work, with clear goals, deliverables and identification of a supervisor, in their proposed job description. We encourage host units to plan for regular interaction with interns and to include them in team meetings. The review process will be overseen by the vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Scope and Duration

In-person, remote and/or hybrid internships will be considered. The proposed internship experience should last for up to three months in the summer and proposals may be configured in one of the following formats:

  1. Three-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $8,250 as well as coverage of summer tuition and health fee
  2. Two-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $5,500 as well as coverage of summer tuition and health fee
  3. One and a half month/6-week internship (19.9 hours/week); intern will receive a stipend of $4,125 as well as coverage of summer tuition and health fee

The proposed internship will take place between May 16 – August 19, 2022, and interns will receive a stipend as well as coverage of summer tuition and the summer health fee across the June – August payroll cycles.

Proposal Requirements

Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/phd_internships_duke) through January 28, 2022, at 5:00 p.m. You will be asked to provide the following information:

  • Title and brief description (one paragraph) for your proposed internship position
  • Number of interns your unit anticipates hosting
  • Start and end dates for the internship
  • Name and contact information for your unit business manager
  • Name and contact information for the internship coordinator and the direct supervisor (if different)
  • Brief plan (maximum one page) that articulates the anticipated project or projects, describes the nature of engagement with organizational staff members, and specifies how the organization envisages a remote/virtual work experience (if relevant)
  • Confirmation of cost share.

Contact

For questions related to the online application and/or other logistical questions, please contact Amy Feistel, amy.feistel@duke.edu.

For questions related to internship work plans or cost sharing, please contact Edward J. Balleisen, eballeis@duke.edu.

Duke English Ph.D. Students Share Summer Internship Experiences

During the summer of 2021, several English Ph.D. students are gaining work experience through internships. Five of these students shared insight into their experiences:

Shirley Li.Shirley Li, ’23, is interning at RTI International (RTI). She began her internship working on the East Africa Energy Program Impact project in early June. Li is designing and conducting a “most significant change” (MSC) study of the influence the East Africa Energy Program had on the enabling environment around the grid-based energy sector in Kenya. She expects the study to blend government consulting, international development and social science research. Li learned about this internship opportunity through Duke’s Provost Experiential Fellowships program, which offers summer research internships to continuing Ph.D. students.

Duke University Press.Two students are interning for Duke University Press this summer. Carolin Benack, ’23, is interning as a journal platform creator. In her role, Benack assists the business systems and IT teams in creating the Scholarly Publishing Collective, a set of services ranging from journal subscription management to web hosting for university presses beyond Duke University Press. Benack builds and reviews journal sites and provides data analysis and management for them. She learned about this Provost Internship through Duke’s Office of Interdisciplinary Studies’ website.

“Working at the Press is reminding me of my professional identity outside of academia. I realize that the skills I gained during my Ph.D. training are much more useful in the nonprofit/business world than I thought. I’m learning the appropriate language to make these skills legible to nonacademic employers.” – Carolin Benack

Jessica Covil-Manset, ’23, is also interning with Duke University Press in the books marketing sector. She started working with Duke University Press during the fall of 2020 and has continued into the summer of 2021 with additional hours. When asked about her responsibilities, Covil-Manset noted that they are diverse. She orders books for reviewers, processes book reviews to share with authors, researches awards, writes nomination cover letters, writes descriptions of books for catalogs, schedules tweets to advertise books and events, formulates questions for Q&As with authors, and creates posts for the Duke University Press blog.

Covil-Manset shared that she is learning a lot about the behind-the-scenes elements of the publishing industry and how various staff positions collaborate to assure a book’s success. She now knows how acquisitions editors acquire and develop content that the publisher can utilize to market a book.

Covil-Manset added, “I’ve benefited greatly from the mentorship program that Duke University Press recently started. I was paired with Elizabeth Ault, an editor at DUP whom I’ve enjoyed video conferencing with and whose perspective/advice I truly value.”

Story+.Ellie Vilakazi, ’25, is interning locally as a graduate student project manager for Story+.

The Franklin Humanities Institute and Bass Connections offer Story+ as a 6-week paid summer research experience for Duke undergraduate and graduate students interested in exploring interdisciplinary humanities research topics and methodologies. Vilakazi began her internship in May overseeing international undergraduate students conducting research. Her team interviews international students who resided in Durham during the summer of 2020.

Vilakazi is responsible for guiding her team through the interview process and the development of a creative, visually compelling website. The website features stories organized around the themes, challenges, shows of resilience, and records of institutional solutions that emerge from the project’s interviews. She is leading an interview training session to prepare her students to write these stories, and she meets with them four times a week for an hour to discuss their progress.

“I am an English student. IRB (Institutional Review Board) and human research is not something I have to deal with in my studies, but it has been eye-opening to see the whole application process and how to deal with human beings as data. This internship has taught me more about the nuances of scholarly interviews as opposed to journalistic interviews. I have tremendous respect for the work that social scientists do now that I have had a small view into the process of researching human beings.” – Ellie Vilakazi

Catherine Lee.Catherine Lee, ’23, is completing an internship at Durham Technical Community College. Her internship is one of the Provost’s internships for Ph.D. students without summer funding. Lee is working with Durham Tech’s Creative and Liberal Arts faculty to diversify the curriculum for general education courses (British Literature I and II) so that they are more inclusive of groups historically left out of the Western canon. During her internship, she will be researching work from underrepresented communities in British literature and developing course content for future instructors.

“I can’t say I have learned much about the industry or professionalization yet, but the research that I have been doing has been fun and informative.” – Catherine Lee

The students featured in this article found their internships through Duke University resources that provide information about internship opportunities sponsored by the university or partners. Each student took advantage of the internship to gain insight into an industry they may pursue upon completing their studies. Opportunities like these provide real-life experience and allow our doctoral students to learn about alternative potential careers and professions.

By Quantá Holden, Digital Communication Specialist; originally posted on the Duke English Department website