Duke I&E Offers Graduate Research Assistantship for 2019-2020

Duke I&E.

Deadline: April 15, 2019

This graduate research assistantship (GA) is offered by the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative (Duke I&E) as a one-year appointment for the 2019-20 term.

The Duke I&E GA will support and contribute to scholarship and research programming at Duke I&E throughout their appointment as follows:

  • Collaborate on the design and management of research and evaluation studies
  • Collect, analyze and summarize qualitative and quantitative data
  • Participate in project management and project meetings
  • Prepare findings for reports and publication
  • Support the planning and execution of research events including, the annual research symposium, annual research conference, and research seminar series.

Compensation

In addition to access to the resources at the Duke I&E Initiative, the assistantship offers up to 100% stipend coverage (i.e.,19.9 hours per week or $31,800, annually).

This assistantship does not cover tuition, fees, or healthcare. Moreover, students cannot exceed the annual maximum supplemental stipend allotment see the Ph.D. Stipend Supplementation Policy.

Qualifications

This assistantship is intended to support Duke University doctoral students in their fifth or sixth year of study. Students must be enrolled as full time but may be in any program.

Candidates must have demonstrated proficiency in research methods, program evaluation, and/or data science; excellent written and oral communication skills; strong organizational and analytical skills; and demonstrated ability to work independently as well as in a team. Preference will be given to candidates who have an interest in subject matters related to innovation and entrepreneurship.

Application

Application materials must be submitted electronically by April 15, 2019 via the online form.

The search committee will review applications and invite finalists in for interviews the week of April 22, 2019. The awardee will be notified in writing no later than May 6, 2019; the appointment is a one-year appointment, it will start September 1, 2019 and end August 31, 2020.

Contact

For questions or concerns about the assistantship, please contact the research team at the Duke I&E Initiative: ie-research@duke.edu or 919-613-9517.

Duke Partners with UNICEF to Accelerate Entrepreneurship for Social Impact

Duke alumna Selwyn Rayzor discusses the Duke-UNICEF Innovation Accelerator during UNICEF’s Annual Summit in March 2019.

At UNICEF’s recent annual summit, Duke alumna Selwyn Rayzor represented the University on a panel about UNICEF’s partnerships, speaking about the Duke-UNICEF Innovation Accelerator.

The Accelerator—a partnership between Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship (I&E) and UNICEF USA—will support social impact entrepreneurs in finding and implementing solutions to the most pressing challenges facing children and youth worldwide.

Rayzor, who serves on the boards for both Duke I&E and UNICEF USA, explained the vision of the Accelerator to support innovators in generating meaningful, sustainable change. “There’s not a lack of innovative ideas,” she said. “There’s a lack of human resources and capital to really grow those ideas.”

Applications for the Accelerator’s first year will be sought and accepted this summer. The first cohort will consist of innovations addressing an issue that impacts girls worldwide: menstrual hygiene management. Innovations that create solutions for a lack of knowledge about menstruation and insufficient access to materials have the potential to reduce stigma and shame, improve school absenteeism, and impact girls’ futures.

The program will support innovators in acquiring the knowledge, tools, and networks to achieve maximum impact. Innovators will identify problems and assess solutions, then develop, build, and scale an innovation, focusing on scale and sustainability. The goal of innovations generated in the Accelerator is to enable earlier, faster, and more effective responses to situations and emergencies endangering children and youth.

In addition to investing in specific projects, the Accelerator will increase engagement in the Duke community, presenting faculty and graduate/professional students with opportunities to learn and innovate. In helping the world’s most vulnerable children, Duke and UNICEF also hope to cultivate a new generation of humanitarian leaders and scholars.

Originally published on the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship website

Image: Left, Duke alumna Selwyn Rayzor discusses the Duke-UNICEF Innovation Accelerator during UNICEF’s Annual Summit in March 2019; right, Accelerator logo

Faculty to Pursue Collaborations through 2019 Intellectual Community Planning Grants

ICPG 2019.

A key goal of Together Duke is to invest in faculty as scholars and leaders of the university’s intellectual communities. To foster collaboration around new and emerging areas of interest, Intellectual Community Planning Grants (ICPG) are available to groups of faculty.

These grants cover the cost of food, meeting venues, external speakers or other meeting costs, and exploratory research into potential collaborators at Duke and elsewhere. The offices of the Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies and the Executive Vice Provost oversee this seed grant program.

For the 2019 calendar year, eight groups received Intellectual Community Planning Grants ranging from $1,000 to $5,000.

Big Data and Social Interactions

Big Data and Social Interactions faculty members.

This group will facilitate interactions among faculty who want to learn how technological advancements and big data can improve our understanding of the ways in which social norms and interactions affect individuals’ and firms’ behavior. The primary goal is to produce sustained interactions and research papers capable of being published in leading scholarly journals. A kick-off event will include a visiting speaker. Subsequent meetings will invite faculty to provide overviews of recent research and discuss new ideas; review colleagues’ early-stage research ideas; and share early work with a guest speaker who is a pioneer in the field.

  • Lead: Jillian Grennan, Fuqua School of Business
  • Chris Bail, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Sanford School of Public Policy
  • Ines Black, Fuqua School of Business, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Ofer Eldar, Law School, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Sarah Gaither, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Sharique Hasan, Fuqua School of Business, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Rachel Kranton, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • David Robinson, Fuqua School of Business, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative

Building Duke’s Community of Theoretical Chemists via a Summer Undergraduate Research Program

Building Duke’s Community of Theoretical Chemists via a Summer Undergraduate Research Program faculty members.

An emerging community of theoretical chemists at Duke is spread across schools and departments. This group has begun to organize a Summer Undergraduate Research Program in Theoretical Chemistry, which will help strengthen the pool of graduate student applicants from North America. The Intellectual Community Planning Grant will enable the participation of more faculty (those who could not fully fund a student on their own) and support team-building excursions. All faculty will present multiple seminars and mentor the summer undergraduate researchers.

  • Lead: David Beratan, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke University Energy Initiative
  • Hashim Al-Hashimi, School of Medicine
  • Volker Blum, Pratt School of Engineering, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke University Energy Initiative
  • Patrick Charbonneau, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Stephen Craig, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke University Energy Initiative
  • Bruce Randall Donald, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke Center for Genomic and Computational Biology
  • Jianfeng Lu, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Michael Rubinstein, Pratt School of Engineering, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Warren S. Warren, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine
  • Weitao Yang, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke University Energy Initiative

Exploring STEAM (Science, Arts, and Humanities) at Duke

Exploring STEAM at Duke members.

A working group of Duke faculty, staff, administrators, and students will explore overlapping and complementary interests in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, arts, and humanities (broadly referred to as STEAM), and promote more robust interdisciplinary research, coursework, and public engagement in this space, both within and beyond Duke. The group will organize a half-day forum to catalog and describe innovative STEAM activities occurring at Duke and spark new collaborations among faculty, students, staff, and administrators.

  • Lead: Misha Angrist, Social Science Research Institute, Duke Initiative for Science & Society, Sanford School of Public Policy
  • Co-lead: Jory Weintraub, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Project manager: Ariana Eily, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Nicolette Cagle, Nicholas School of the Environment
  • Aria Chernik, Social Science Research Institute, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Claudia Gunsch, Pratt School of Engineering, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University Energy Initiative
  • Jules Odendahl-James, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Nimmi Ramanujam, Pratt School of Engineering, School of Medicine, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke Initiative for Science & Society, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Nina Sherwood, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Kearsley Stewart, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Victoria Szabo, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative

Health as an Ecosystem: Expanding Our Imaginations of Health

Health as an Ecosystem faculty members.

In ecology, an ecosystem is a community of living organisms and their interactions with the abiotic environment. Dynamic and complex, they may flourish in settings of balance, diversity, and responsive resilience, or they may flounder in contexts of deficit and disruption. This group will apply the ecosystem concept to health and explore new perspectives on health systems, population health, well-being, and disease. During monthly meetings, members will consider a range of questions and engage in activities whose focus will encompass capstone projects, seminars, and future grant proposals.

  • Lead: John Moses, School of Medicine, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Co-lead: Jennifer Lawson, School of Medicine, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Charles Nunn, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Richard Di Giulio, Nicholas School of the Environment, Pratt School of Engineering
  • Alice Ammerman, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
  • Eliana Perrin, School of Medicine
  • Eric Richardson, Pratt School of Engineering
  • Jan Holton, Divinity School
  • Brett McCarty, Divinity School
  • Bill Walker, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Peter English, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Gopal Sreenivasan, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Norman Wirzba, Divinity School, Nicholas School of the Environment
  • Jon Fjeld, Fuqua School of Business, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Ray Barfield, School of Medicine, Divinity School, School of Nursing, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Warren Kinghorn, School of Medicine, Divinity School, Duke Initiative for Science & Society

Launching a Triangle-Wide Seminar in the Economics of Education

Launching a Triangle-Wide Seminar in the Economics of Education faculty members.

Currently, there is no regular forum for economists from the Triangle to discuss new empirical work on the economics of education. This group will change that by organizing a one-day workshop. Hosted by the Center for Child and Family Policy, the event will include invited presenters, discussants, and a keynote speaker. It will also serve as a means to explore the possibility of launching a year-long seminar series in 2019-2020 on the economics of education.

Marine Medicine: Multidisciplinary Research at the Nexus of the Environment and Human Health

Marine Medicine faculty members.

Marine medicine is focused on research that cuts across disciplines, including cross-species comparative analyses of cancer protective mechanisms, understanding the risk of disease from exposure to environmental toxins, and discovery of new drugs from marine compounds. This working group will convene monthly and invite guest speakers to provide critical feedback on papers and proposals. Members will also host an annual symposium with a keynote speaker and a networking event to establish collaborations between faculty across the School of Medicine and the Nicholas School of the Environment, and create a long-term strategy for sustained interactions.

Parasite-Host Evolution Network Optimization (PHENO) Working Group

Parasite-Host Evolution Network Optimization (PHENO) Working Group faculty members.

Better methods are needed to identify new pathogens or known animal pathogens with the potential to infect humans and cause disease. Given that pathogens transmit through chains of contact, network-based approaches that represent these epidemiological pathways offer great promise. Through regular meetings, this group of faculty and postdocs will investigate the application of network approaches to a wide range of disease systems and aim to develop new and fundable research projects.

  • Lead: James Moody, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Social Science Research Institute
  • Charles Nunn, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Craig Rawlings, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Gregory Gray, School of Medicine, Duke Global Health Institute
  • Chris Woods, School of Medicine, Duke Global Health Institute
  • Meira Epplein, School of Medicine
  • James Herrera, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Dana Pasquale, Duke Network Analysis Center

Social Studies of Science Working Group

Social Studies of Science Working Group faculty members.

The social study of science, often referred to as science and technology studies, is an interdisciplinary field whose scholars explore topics ranging from the ethical implications of data hacking and the politics of nuclear power to questions of personhood emerging from neuroscience. This group will bring together faculty who are interested in the rapid scale-up of research in the biomedical sciences, data and computational sciences, and environmental sciences as well as the increasing overlap of science and technology studies, medical humanities, and environmental humanities. Members aim to build a network of Duke and Triangle faculty and foster linked research endeavors.

  • Lead: Harris Solomon, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Nicole Barnes, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Global Health Institute
  • Nima Bassiri, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Paul Bendich, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Rhodes Information Initiative at Duke
  • Mark Olson, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Initiative for Science & Society, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Cate Reilly, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Gabriel Rosenberg, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Priscilla Wald, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Ara Wilson, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Initiative for Science & Society

Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Offers Incubation Funding for Idea-stage Projects

Apply now.

Deadline: February 25, 2019

I.  Purpose

The Duke Incubation Fund (the “Fund”) was formed to support idea-stage projects at Duke University. The Fund will make a number of awards each year to support novel ideas, applied research, potential products, nascent services and creative projects that if successful, will lead to new opportunities in the market. To receive funding, projects must demonstrate a potential path to subsequent financial support, new company formation, licensing, not-for-profit partnering or other channels to enable translation.

The Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, which administers the Fund, is interested in innovative projects that could lead to new products or services that will have a positive impact on society, including:

  • Demonstrating the feasibility of an idea or innovation for a commercial or social venture
  • Developing a working software or device prototype
  • Obtaining supporting evidence or proof-of-concept for new ideas
  • Developing new applications or markets for a technology under development
  • Creative projects that might lead to professionally produced content

Applications are welcome from all fields of inquiry. At least one member of any team must be from Duke. Awards will be contingent on the innovator entering into a Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with the Incubation Fund.

II.  Key Dates

  • Application Submission Deadline*: February 25th, 2019
  • Final Selection: March 18th, 2019
  • Funding Period: May 1, 2019 – April 31, 2020

*Award Cycles will typically occur twice per year (Fall & Spring). However, the Selection Committee may elect to provide seed funds to particularly compelling projects off-cycle if it deems immediate funds are warranted. Preference will be given to requests of less than $5,000. To be considered for off-cycle award, contact Judd Staples judd.staples@duke.edu.

III.  Eligibility

  • Proposals may be submitted by Duke faculty (tenure and non-tenure track), graduate students, postdocs, and medical residents and fellows with approval of the appropriate mentor or unit coordinator.
  • Individuals may submit more than one proposal, but are only eligible to receive one award per cycle. Promising projects that are not selected will be encouraged to reapply.
  • Funds may be spent within Duke or within a start-up company formed to commercialize the innovation. For projects without a company, one team member must establish a project-specific cost object (WBS Fund) within their department to accept award. No funds can be distributed directly to individuals.

IV.  Funding

Each award will consist of up to $20,000 (direct costs only). Preference will be given to applications with high potential for significant advancement. Funds may be spent within Duke or within a start-up company formed to commercialize the innovation.

Funding will be in the form a Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with the Duke Incubator Fund. Proceeds from the sales of the equity obtained through these agreements will used to finance future awards.

Note: This award is internally funded and does not need to be routed through the Duke Office of Research Administration (ORA). However, internal applicants should have a DPAF form to ensure accuracy of salary and effort.

VI.   Application Procedure

The Duke Incubation Fund Award uses the MyResearchProposal online application software to submit applications.

  • To apply visit http://bit.ly/myresearchproposal, click on “Create New User” (or log in if you already have an account). Proposals must be submitted under the Principal Investigator’s
  • A step-by-step user’s guide for applying via the MyResearchProposal software is available – Please review this document.
  • Enter Access Code I&E then select the “Duke Incubation Fund Spring 2019” funding opportunity and follow the instructions.
  • For any questions concerning MyResearchProposal passwords or system issues, please contact Anita Grissom or Kara McKelvey at myresearchproposal@duke.edu

Applicants will enter general project information via the web-based form:

  1. Project Title, Brief Description, and Amount Requested
  2. Primary Contact Name, Department/Company, phone, email
  3. General Project Information: Applicants will be asked to answer general questions regarding the project (e.g. type of business, relationship to Duke, stage of development, ongoing sources of funding).
  4. Intellectual Property (Character Limit: 500)
  5. Compliance Plan (Character Limit: 500)

Some proposal sections will be uploaded as individual PDF files. The application sections are:

  1. Intellectual Property: Summarize intellectual property, including any know-how, invention disclosure numbers, patent filings, copyrighted material, etc. If appropriate, you will be asked to provide contact information from OLV.
  2. Budget: Upload a one-year spending plan using the I&E Budget Form.
  3. Team Experience: Include a resume or NIH Biosketches for each key member of the research team (as a single PDF). Each individual resume may not exceed 4 pages.
  4. Project Description: The Project Description should include: Idea, Background, Justification, Problem-Being- Solved, Preliminary/Supporting Data, Methods, Quarterly Milestones to be achieved during the year, and a plan for follow-on funding (5-Page limit, including tables and figures; and shorter applications are welcome). References do not count toward the 5-page limit; single spacing, font no smaller than Arial 11 and margins greater than 0.5”. The follow-on funding plan may include grant applications, internal funding, equity raises, licensing, selling product, or strategic partnerships.

VII.   Budget Guidelines

Grant funds may be budgeted for:

  • Salary support for the PI or collaborators
  • Research support personnel
  • Travel necessary to perform the research
  • Research supplies and core lab costs
  • Other purposes deemed necessary for the successful execution of the proposed project

Grant funds may not be budgeted for:

  • Company G&A
  • Legal
  • IP expense
  • Capital equipment
  • Overhead
  • Student tuition and fees

VIII.   Terms of the Award

  • Approvals Required Prior to Funding Start Date: Prior to receiving funds, research involving human subjects must have appropriate approvals from the Duke IRB. If the research includes animals, the appropriate IACUC animal research forms must also be approved before the project’s start date. Failure to submit documents in the requested timeframe may result in cancellation of funding.
  • SAFE Agreement: Prior to receiving funds, applicants must complete a Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with Incubator Fund.
  • Project Execution: Investigators agree to work in collaboration with Duke I&E and present the findings of their work at six months. Duke I&E may terminate and reallocate residual funds for any team failing to submit required written reports in a timely manner. Proposed aims of funded projects may be changed, added or deleted during the funding period, pending Investigator and Duke I&E review and agreement.The investigators will interact regularly with Duke Venture Advisors, who will serve as a resource to identify and fulfill unmet project needs via OLV, Duke I&E and other key resources. Any awardee who leaves his or her position should contact Duke I&E to discuss future plans for the project.
  • Post-Award Reporting: When requested, all awardees will be expected to provide updates that they achieved as a result of the award.

Contact Information

For additional information on this funding opportunity, contact Judd Staples judd.staples@duke.edu

Learn more and view PDF

Duke Incubation Fund Open to Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs, Residents/Fellows

Incubation Fund

Deadline: September 24, 2018

Purpose

The Duke Incubation Fund (the “Fund”) was formed to support idea-stage projects at Duke University. The Fund will make a number of awards each year to support novel ideas, applied research, potential products, nascent services, and creative projects that, if successful, will lead to new opportunities in the market. To receive funding, projects must demonstrate a potential path to subsequent financial support, new company formation, licensing, not-for-profit partnering, or other channels to enable translation.

The Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, which administers the Fund, is interested in innovative projects that could lead to new products or services that will have a positive impact on society, including:

  • Demonstrating the feasibility of an idea or innovation for a commercial or social venture
  • Developing a working software or device prototype
  • Obtaining supporting evidence or proof-of-concept for new ideas
  • Developing new applications or markets for a technology under development
  • Creative projects that might lead to professionally produced content.

Applications are welcome from all fields of inquiry. At least one member of any team must be from Duke. Awards will be contingent on the innovator entering into a Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with the Incubation Fund.

Key Dates

  • Application Submission Deadline*: September 24, 2018
  • Selection of Finalists: October 15, 2018
  • Oral Presentations: October (TBD)
  • Final Selection: November 12, 2018
  • Funding Period: December 1, 2018 – November 30, 2019

*Award Cycles will typically occur twice per year (Fall and Spring). However, the Selection Committee may elect to provide seed funds to particularly compelling projects off-cycle if it deems immediate funds are warranted. Preference will be given to requests of less than $5,000. To be considered for off-cycle award, contact Judd Staples, judd.staples@duke.edu.

Eligibility

  • Proposals may be submitted by Duke faculty (tenure and non-tenure track), graduate students, post-docs, and medical residents and fellows with approval of the appropriate mentor or unit coordinator.
  • Individuals may submit more than one proposal, but are only eligible to receive one award per cycle. Promising projects that are not selected will be encouraged to reapply.
  • Funds may be spent within Duke or within a start-up company formed to commercialize the innovation. For projects without a company, one team member must establish a project-specific cost object (WBS Fund) within their department to accept award. No funds can be distributed directly to individuals.

Funding

Each award will consist of up to $20,000 (direct costs only). Preference will be given to applications with high potential for significant advancement. Funds may be spent within Duke or within a start-up company formed to commercialize the innovation.

Funding will be in the form a Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with the Duke Incubator Fund. Proceeds from the sales of the equity obtained through these agreements will used to finance future awards.

Note: This award is internally funded and does not need to be routed through the Duke Office of Research Administration (ORA). However, internal applicants should have a DPAF form to ensure accuracy of salary and effort.

Application Procedure

The Duke Incubation Fund Award uses the MyResearchProposal online application software to submit applications.

  • To apply, visit http://bit.ly/myresearchproposal, click on “Create New User” (or log in if you already have an account). Proposals must be submitted under the Principal Investigator’s name.
  • A step-by-step user’s guide for applying via the MyResearchProposal software is Please review this document.
  • Enter Access Code I&E, then select the “Duke Incubation Fund Spring 2018” funding opportunity and follow the instructions.
  • For any questions concerning MyResearchProposal passwords or system issues, please contact Anita Grissom or Kara McKelvey at myresearchproposal@duke.edu.

Applicants will enter general project information via the web-based form:

  • Project Title, Brief Description, and Amount Requested
  • Primary Contact Name, Department/Company, phone, email
  • General Project Information: Applicants will be asked to answer general questions regarding the project (e.g. type of business, relationship to Duke, stage of development, ongoing sources of funding).
  • Intellectual Property (Character Limit: 500)
  • Compliance Plan (Character Limit: 500)

Some proposal sections will be uploaded as individual PDF files. The application sections are:

  • Intellectual Property: Summarize intellectual property, including any know-how, invention disclosure numbers, patent filings, copyrighted material, etc. If appropriate, you will be asked to provide contact information from OLV.
  • Team Experience: Include a resume or NIH Biosketches for each key member of the research team (as a single PDF). Each individual resume may not exceed 4 pages.
  • Project Description: The Project Description should include: Idea, Background, Justification, Problem-Being-Solved, Preliminary/Supporting Data, Methods, Quarterly Milestones to be achieved during the year, and a plan for follow-on funding (5-Page limit, including tables and figures; and shorter applications are welcome). References do not count toward the 5-page limit; single spacing, font no smaller than Arial 11 and margins greater than 0.5”. The follow-on funding plan may include grant applications, internal funding, equity raises, licensing, selling product, or strategic partnerships.

Budget Guidelines

Grant funds may be budgeted for:

  • Salary support for the PI or collaborators
  • Research support personnel
  • Travel necessary to perform the research
  • Research supplies and core lab costs
  • Other purposes deemed necessary for the successful execution of the proposed project.

Grant funds may not be budgeted for:

  • Company G&A
  • Legal
  • IP expense
  • Capital equipment
  • Overhead
  • Student tuition and fees.

Terms of the Award

  • Approvals Required Prior to Funding Start Date: Prior to receiving funds, research involving human subjects must have appropriate approvals from the Duke IRB. If the research includes animals, the appropriate IACUC animal research forms must also be approved before the project’s start date. Failure to submit documents in the requested timeframe may result in cancellation of funding.
  • SAFE Agreement: Prior to receiving funds, applicants must complete a Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with Incubator Fund.
  • Project Execution: Investigators agree to work in collaboration with Duke I&E and present the findings of their work at six months. Duke I&E may terminate and reallocate residual funds for any team failing to submit required written reports in a timely Proposed aims of funded projects may be changed, added or deleted during the funding period, pending Investigator and Duke I&E review and agreement. The investigators will interact regularly with Duke Venture Advisors, who will serve as a resource to identify and fulfill unmet project needs via OLV, Duke I&E, and other key resources. Any awardee who leaves his or her position should contact Duke I&E to discuss future plans for the project.
  • Post-Award Reporting: When requested, all awardees will be expected to provide updates that they achieved as a result of the award.

Contact Information

For additional information on this funding opportunity, contact Judd Staples, judd.staples@duke.edu

Duke I&E Announces New Funding Opportunity to Support Early-stage Ideas

Incubation fund

Deadline: January 8, 2018

The Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative announces the creation of the Duke Incubation Fund, a vehicle for enabling idea-stage projects originating within the campus innovation ecosystem.

The fund will offer awards to Duke faculty, graduate students, postdocs, and medical residents and fellows to support early-stage ideas based on Duke intellectual property with the potential to go to market and impact society.

Each award will consist of up to $20,000 (direct costs only). Funds may be spent within Duke or within a start-up company formed to commercialize the innovation. Applications are welcome from all fields of inquiry. The application submission deadline is January 8, 2018.

To learn more about the Duke Incubation Fund, read the announcement and visit the website.

Creating Meaning: Undergraduate Pursues an Intellectual Question across Boundaries

Kelsey Graywill

Duke senior Kelsey Graywill knew she wanted to take a nontraditional approach to her education. “When I was applying for colleges, I specifically looked at schools that I saw had established resources for doing interdisciplinary majors or programs,” she told interviewer Brian Southwell on the Measure of Everyday Life radio show. “I had this fantasy, where maybe one day instead of students picking a major, students will pick a question; then you design your whole program around answering that intellectual question and working at that intersection.”

Bass Connections team in UgandaGraywill designed her own major, which she titled Creating Meaning: Empirical & Evolutionary Neuroaesthetics.

For the past two years she has taken part in an interdisciplinary research project through Bass Connections, collaborating with Duke Global Neurosurgery and Neuroscience and Uganda’s Mulago National Referral Hospital to improve neurosurgical patient outcomes.

Graywill and her teammates received the Duke Global Health Institute’s award for best poster among Bass Connections projects for Improving Hand Hygiene through Accessibility in an LMIC Neurosurgical Ward.

“I think that the way that a lot of traditional jobs are being phased out of the workforce,” said Graywill, “we’re going to need more and more students to be looking at intersections and collaboration across disciplines.”

Graywill also teaches a Trinity College House Course on graphic medicine and is part of Melissa & Doug Entrepreneurs, a year-long fellowship program through Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship in which undergraduates create their own startups. Graywill’s company, The Art Clinic, seeks to bridge the gap between art and science to improve health literacy, awareness, quality of care and empathy. Her current product, Brainability, uses art to monitor health status.

The Measure of Everyday Life’s program on Reinventing Higher Education featured a discussion with Cathy Davidson, a former English professor and vice provost for interdisciplinary studies at Duke who now leads the Futures Institute at the City University of New York. She is the author of The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World in Flux. Davidson also took part in a public event at Duke with Ed Balleisen, vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Interdisciplinary Research Teams to Present Results at Bass Connections Showcase

Join the Office of the Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies and the Bass Connections Student Advisory Council for a special year-end showcase event and reception on Thursday, April 20, from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. Come learn more about Bass Connections and find out what these research teams of faculty, grad students, undergrads and community partners have accomplished this year.

4:00-4:30

Reception and poster session begin

4:30-5:15

Students from five project teams will present lightning talks:

5:15-5:30

Bass Connections leaders will recognize this year’s student award recipients:

5:30-6:00

Reception and poster session continue

Parking

Free parking is available in the Blue Zone accessed from the Towerview Road traffic circle. Please contact us if you require other parking arrangements.

Cosponsors

Duke Center for Genomic and Computational Biology (GCB), Duke Council on Race and Ethnicity (DCORE), Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI), Duke Initiative for Science & Society, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences (DIBS), Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, Energy Initiative, Franklin Humanities Institute (FHI), Information Initiative at Duke (iiD), Kenan Institute for Ethics, Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, Social Science Research Institute (SSRI)

Contact