Duke I&E Solicits Proposals for 2021 Seed Grants from the Duke Incubation Fund

Incubation Fund.

Deadline: October 16, 2020

Purpose

The Duke Incubation Fund (the “Fund”) was formed to support idea-stage projects at Duke University. The Fund will make a number of awards each year to support novel ideas, applied research, potential products, nascent services and creative projects that if successful, will lead to new opportunities in the market. To receive funding, projects must demonstrate a potential path to subsequent financial support, new company formation, licensing, not-for-profit partnering or other channels to enable translation.

The Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, which administers the Fund, is interested in innovative projects that could lead to new products or services that will have a positive impact on society, including:

  • Demonstrating the feasibility of an idea or innovation for a commercial or social venture
  • Developing a working software or device prototype
  • Obtaining supporting evidence or proof-of-concept for new ideas
  • Developing new applications or markets for a technology under development
  • Creative projects that might lead to professionally produced content

Applications are welcome from all fields of inquiry. At least one member of any team must be from Duke. Awards will be contingent on the innovator entering into Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with Duke.

Key Dates

  • Application Submission Deadline: 5:00 p.m. on Friday, October 16, 2020
  • Final Selection: November 20, 2020
  • Funding Period: January 1, 2021 – December 31, 2021

Learn more and see the full RFP.

Open Design+ Course Asks Students, How Might We Use the Pandemic to Transform Learning?

Aria Chernik.

Aria Chernik (Associate Professor of the Practice, Social Science Research Institute) will co-lead Open Design+ in Summer Session II. Open Design+ is a new summer program offered through the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative and is part of Bass Connections.

This summer, students will work through the open design thinking process to create a prototype in the problem space: In light of COVID-19, how might we transform learning at Duke?

Why is this course a good fit for summer during the pandemic?

Open Design+ teaches students how to ideate, create, test, and iterate impactful solutions to real-world, complex problems. The pandemic, of course, is an example of just this kind of problem. We need to be able to think big and act creatively—and above all with empathy—to find solutions that can propel communities forward. That’s what students will be doing this summer.

Why did you want to teach this course?

This course combines some of my most strongly-held professional and personal interests and passions. It combines student-driven education innovation with the ethics of open source values and design thinking methodologies.

Can you give us an overview of what you’ll be teaching?

Students will use design thinking to develop innovative solutions to complex, real-world problems. This summer, the challenge space is how might we use the experience of COVID-19 to transform learning at Duke?

Working in small, interdisciplinary teams of undergraduate and graduate students, participants in Open Design+ will gain an understanding of open design, a variation of design thinking that emphasizes the ethical implications of how and what we design.

Students will learn qualitative research skills and conduct extensive interviews with stakeholders in the challenge area, including Duke students, faculty, and administrators to ideate solutions for sustained learning innovation at Duke; they will also learn critical skills and mindsets such as: brainstorming ideas and creating prototypes, testing and iterating solutions, communicating across audiences and media, thinking divergently and convergently, and collaborating and problem-solving in uncertain situations.

How important is collaboration?

Collaboration is absolutely essential. The open design process requires deep and thoughtful collaboration across myriad learning contexts, such as interviewing stakeholders, brainstorming sessions, testing and evaluating prototypes, defining problems, and communicating results. Very little work is done alone. The challenge for us is to create a virtual environment in which the team can collaborate authentically, meaningfully, and frequently, but we are optimistic that we can do this!

What do you hope the students gain from taking this course?

Competencies and mindsets that are critical and applicable across all learning disciplines, careers, and even civic life: listening and creating with empathy, robust collaboration, convergent and divergent thinking, compelling communication across media and audiences, resilience in the face of uncertainty and frustration, creative problem-solving, failing forward, and iterative creation.

Why is social science research so important?

Social science research asks us to reach across disciplines and engage skills ranging from qualitative ethnographic research to quantitative data-driven research. In our increasingly complex world, interdisciplinarity is critical if we are to understand and solve problems that have direct positive social impact.

Originally posted on the Social Science Research Institute website

Duke Seniors Share Their Journeys through the Innovation & Entrepreneurship Certificate

Students with professor.
I&E Undergraduate Certificate students in their capstone course with Professor Aaron Dinin

In a graduation year that will go down in history, the class of 2020 is celebrating virtually, postponing its in-person commencement until the threat of COVID-19 has subsided. This past weekend, Duke’s Marking the Moment digital celebration shared messages from hundreds of members of the Duke community, including a message from the I&E Undergraduate Certificate team.

Students graduating with an I&E Certificate typically gather for an in-person celebration. During this celebration, a subset of Certificate students are acknowledged for exceptional work on their e-portfolio, a required element of the program where they creatively capture artifacts from their work and experiences.

“We’re increasingly finding that students themselves value this requirement, as it’s a useful tool when they apply for jobs or graduate school,” said I&E Senior Program Coordinator Anna Jacobs. “This e-portfolio is an excellent complement to their resumes, allowing them to showcase their personalities, coursework, projects, and writing skills.”

The e-portfolio is meant to deepen students’ reflection of their participation in the program and provide a narrative of their time at Duke—how their coursework, experiential learning, extracurricular activities, and internships align with their interests and goals.

This year, at a time when we can’t honor students in person, the e-portfolios enable us to share and amplify students’ voices, telling the stories of their journeys at Duke and their dreams for the future.

The e-portfolios below represent exceptional work by students from a wide range of majors and interests. We hope you enjoy reading about them, their viewpoints, and what they’re taking away from their I&E Certificate experiences!

Students who did portfolios.
Left to right, first row: Tommaso Babucci, John Bowler, Jordan Burstion. Elliott Davis, Aaron DePass, Ben Edelstein, Abigail Farley, Christine Ford; second row: Nikki Hevizi, Karam Katariya, Jemu Mangira, Meriwether Morris, Ehime Ohue, Scott Pledger, Elle Smyth, Ethan Udell; bottom: Nicole Yuen

Tommaso Babucci

https://tommasobabucci.com/

“Through the program I had the opportunity to work both in the field of social entrepreneurship thanks to Duke Engage Detroit, and in the world of tech and eCommerce SaaS while at E Fundamentals in London. These two experiences taught me crucial entrepreneurial values, the importance of innovation and non-profit work, and how to adapt to different work in different markets.”

John Bowler

http://sites.duke.edu/iejohnbowler

“During my time in the I&E program, I conquered my fear of public speaking, learned how to create a DCF from scratch, made a superhero themed Rube Goldberg machine, designed my own website, met with the head of the Economics department, ran a fake phishing campaign, created a full scale model spaceship out of cardboard, recited a two hundred line soliloquy in front of an audience, developed a motion-activated bar soap shredder, and printed my own Happy Meals toy.”

Jordan Burstion

https://sites.duke.edu/iejordanburstion

“Before writing this reflection, I reread my application for the I&E Certificate program. In it, I spoke of wanting to help people achieve their goals, listen to others share their stories, identify my strengths and weaknesses, find a productive outlet, and uncover an unparalleled learning experience. I hadn’t revisited that application until now, and it makes me smile to know I was able to achieve all of my goals at Duke with the help of the I&E Certificate program.”

Elliott Davis

http://sites.duke.edu/ieelliottdavis/

“It feels like forever ago that my family drove up to GA to blasting music and enthusiastic FACs to unload my mom’s minivan filled with all my stuff. I have learned and grown so much since then, as a student and a person, and become more equipped to become the environmental leader and change-maker that I aspire to be.”

Aaron DePass

https://sites.duke.edu/ieaarondepass/

“[The Certificate] led to me being able to critically assess my future in entrepreneurship. It helped me to realize that creating a venture, although incredibly difficult, is possible. From that revelation, the keystone then equipped me with the skills to actually go and act on it should I want to. It also put the ideas into perspective and gave me reasons why I may not want to be an entrepreneur—information just as helpful as knowing you want to be one. And the capstone empowered me to challenge the status quo (something I already loved doing) in areas where you’re not confident or in your zone of familiarity at all.”

Ben Edelstein

https://sites.duke.edu/iebenedelstein/

“Without the certificate, I could’ve easily blocked out my interest in startups and focused more on other, easier things. Each I&E class, event, program, or alumnus reminded me that starting a company is what I want to accomplish and inspired me to keep trying.”

Abigail Farley

https://sites.duke.edu/ieabigailfarley/

“My first ideation session I could only fill a handful of sticky notes. I felt myself censoring my ideas and hesitating to write down the more ridiculous ones. Four years and many ideation sessions later, I am proud to say that I can fill sticky notes with ridiculous ideas without judging myself, and I truly believe that there are no worthless ideas. This mental shift has enabled me to think more innovatively and creatively without fear of failure.”

Christine Ford

https://sites.duke.edu/iechristineford

“These creative problem solving skills will be extremely helpful in the engineering field, in which it is necessary to approach and critically think about problems in a way others might have overlooked. Further, I feel confident in my ability to ideate solutions to problems in the world around me, as well as to develop a successful business venture to solve them.”

Nikki Hevizi

http://nicolettehevizi.com/

“The I&E program, community, and the mentorship I received along the way encouraged me to explore my interests in UX design, product management, and sales engineering in the different contexts of an early stage startup vs. a large corporate setting to get a sense of what kinds of jobs I might be interested in after graduation, and the bigger picture of the career path I should pursue.”

Karam Katariya

https://sites.duke.edu/iekaramkatariya/

“Coming into Duke, I thought innovation and entrepreneurship was limited to small startups growing exponentially. However, [the Certificate] showed me there was so much more to the entrepreneurial world. I became exposed to the exciting innovations taking place across industries, be it from individuals running startups for which they were the only employee to new ideas being generated for clients on a trading floor.”

Jemu Mangira

https://jemumangira.wixsite.com/jemumangira

“Working on the cases in teams made me understand more deeply why so many businesses are making it a priority to build diverse teams. We all viewed the business cases and problems through a unique lens, and brought opinions and ideas that represented very specific, important, but also limited perspectives. When we shared those ideas with each other and challenged each other to see a situation differently, we always came to a better, more thoughtful and sustainable conclusion.”

Meriwether Morris

www.meriwetherlewismorris.com

“In my education as a neuroscience major, I found much of my education involved learning the intricacies of various mechanisms, theories, and models of function that were critical to developing an understanding of the brain. However, as a neuroscience student who is fascinated by the brain and behavior who does not intend to pursue a medical career, I craved more in the domain of practical applicability of discoveries. I found that in Innovation & Entrepreneurship.”

Ehime Ohue

https://sites.duke.edu/ieehimeohue/

“I will forever be an advocate for this program to future Duke Students and feel that even if they don’t pursue the complete certificate, they need to take at least one I&E class because it provides a lots of hands-on opportunities and ways of thinking that are not always available in other classes. Although I may not have a solid plan of what all I want to do after graduation (this program has also taught me that no one really does), I know that I will be more prepared for any path I take because of completing the I&E Certificate program.”

Scott Pledger

https://scottpledger.me/

“We live in a world of incentives. The better you can understand what motivates you and those around you, the better you can understand why we act in the ways we do. Humans are very complex creatures, but we can be very predictable if you can understand the underlying incentives. This is why empathy is such an incredibly important trait to have in order to be a successful entrepreneur. If you can empathize with the challenges people face in life, you can better understand the ways you can help them to address these challenges.”

Elle Smyth

https://sites.duke.edu/ieelizabethsmyth/

“[The Certificate] was the perfect complement to mechanical engineering, as I was able to discover problems that exist in the world and work to utilize my engineering skills to dream up solutions. I think a lot of college courses tend to be too realistic. The I&E certificate allowed me to dream up the impossible.”

Ethan Udell

https://sites.duke.edu/ieethanudell/

“I was particularly intrigued by the operational differences between large conglomerate music companies and smaller independent organizations, especially in the scope of the changing dynamic of the music industry. In addition, I wanted to explore the use of technological platforms to help artists kickstart their careers.”

Nicole Yuen

https://sites.duke.edu/ienicoleyuen

“The Certificate bridged my interests in technology and design, while also providing a lens into the business world. I have always known that I would love to pursue a career in product design—the creative aspects of engineering where I can utilize my passions for both my engineering and art. After completing the Certificate requirements, I believe that I have gained a well-rounded perspective of engineering, art, and entrepreneurship.”

Originally posted on the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship website

Duke I&E Invites Incubation Fund Proposals for Projects with Growth Potential

Incubation Fund.

Deadline: April 12, 2020

Overview

The spring application cycle is open for the Duke Incubation Fund. The Fund provides awards of up to $20,000 to support a wide range of idea-stage projects across Duke with commercial prospects. Applications are welcome from all Duke schools—we’re looking for innovative projects that could lead to new products/services that could positively impact society. To be eligible for up to $20,000 in funding, teams must include at least one Duke-affiliated faculty, postdoctoral fellow, medical resident, or grad/professional student. Funds can be applied towards (but not limited to): demonstrating feasibility, developing a prototype, obtaining supporting evidence or proof-of-concept, developing new markets or applications for current technologies, and development of creative projects. Please contact Sharlini Sankaran with any questions.

Purpose

The Duke Incubation Fund (the “Fund”) was formed to support idea-stage projects at Duke University. The Fund will make a number of awards each year to support novel ideas, applied research, potential products, nascent services and creative projects that if successful, will lead to new opportunities in the market. To receive funding, projects must demonstrate a potential path to subsequent financial support, new company formation, licensing, not-for-profit partnering or other channels to enable translation.

The Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, which administers the Fund, is interested in innovative projects that could lead to new products or services that will have a positive impact on society, including:

  • Demonstrating the feasibility of an idea or innovation for a commercial or social venture
  • Developing a working software or device prototype
  • Obtaining supporting evidence or proof-of-concept for new ideas
  • Developing new applications or markets for a technology under development
  • Creative projects that might lead to professionally produced content

Applications are welcome from all fields of inquiry. At least one member of any team must be from Duke. Each award will consist of up to $20,000 (direct costs only). Preference will be given to applications with high potential for significant advancement. Funds may be spent within Duke or within a start-up company formed to commercialize the innovation.

Awards will be contingent on the innovator entering into Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) Agreement with the Fund. Any proceeds returned to the Fund under the SAFE will be used to finance future awards.

Key Dates

  • Application Submission Deadline: 11:59 p.m. on April 12, 2020
  • Funding Period: June 1, 2020 – May 31, 2021

See the full RFP.

New Summer Program Invites Teams to Apply Design Thinking to Real-world Challenges

Open Design+

Deadline: February 14, 2020

Open De​​​​​​​sign+ is a summer research experience offered during Summer Term II. Working in teams, students will go through the design thinking process, in which they will use qualitative research methods to solve a real-world problem for an assigned client.

This summer marks the first year of this new program. While the program has been modeled after other successful programs at Duke, this is a pilot and the hope is that participating students will help improve the program, viewing this as its own design challenge.

Open Design+ is offered through the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative and is part of Bass Connections.

What Is Open Design?

Inspired by open source software and development communities, open design is a variation of design thinking that emphasizes the ethical implications of how and what we design.

Through this program, students will learn skills such as:

  • Empathizing with stakeholders and defining problem areas
  • Brainstorming ideas and creating prototypes
  • Testing solutions and iterating
  • Communicating across audiences and media
  • Thinking divergently and convergently
  • Collaborating and problem-solving in uncertain situations.

How Will the Program Work?

We will select two teams of students to be paired with clients this summer. We will likely have one Duke-based client and one Durham-based client. Each team will include 3-4 undergraduate students and a graduate student. Teams will work collaboratively for 40-hours a week during Summer Term II (June 29-August 7). Members of Duke’s Innovation & Entrepreneurship instructional team will introduce students to the design process through a bootcamp and ongoing learning sessions.

Compensation and Application Information

Undergraduate students will receive a $3,000 stipend for this full-time research experience, out of which they must arrange their own housing. Participants may not accept employment or take classes during the program. Students must be active students at the time of participation.

The priority deadline for all student applications is February 14, 2020. Applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis.

To apply, please use this online application.

Contact

For questions, please contact Aria Chernik (aria.chernik@duke.edu) or Kevin Hoch (kevin.hoch@duke.edu).

Duke Incubation Fund Awards Support Seven Promising Innovations

Congratulations to the 2019-20 Duke Incubation Fund Awardees.

The winners of the Fall 2019 Duke Incubation Fund awards have been announced, representing promising innovation happening across the University. Seven projects will receive funds totaling $129,000.

The Incubation Fund, run by Duke’s Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative (I&E), supports early-stage ideas from Duke’s innovation ecosystem with the potential to go to market. Whereas many resources exist at Duke to support research and commercialization, the Incubation Fund is among the only opportunities for innovations still in the ideation stage. The Fund is made possible by a gift from I&E advisory board member Jeffrey Citron and his wife, Suzanne.

One goal of the Fund is to foster innovation in all corners of Duke. While previous awards have supported faculty, staff, and students representing schools and departments ranging from the Nicholas School, to the School of Nursing, all the way to the Dance Program, this year’s awardees represent the Department of Pathology, the Duke Human Vaccine Institute, the Department of Radiology, the Department of Chemistry, and the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Incubation Fund Awardees for 2019-2020

Soman Abraham | Pathology Faculty

Mast cells are responsible for a wide range of inflammatory disorders, from mild skin rash to life-threatening anaphylactic shock. This team is exploring a novel mast cell inhibitor molecule to treat non-clonal mast cell activation syndrome (nc-MCAS), for which there are currently no FDA-approved treatments. In addition to potentially preventing nc-MCAS-related anaphylaxis and symptoms, this molecule could lead to the development of therapeutics to treat other mast cell-mediated diseases.

Mattia Bonsignori | Duke Human Vaccine Institute Faculty

Using an antibody type from a Zika-infected pregnant woman who bore a healthy infant—an antibody type that doesn’t cross the placenta or cross-react with the Dengue virus like other antibodies capable of neutralizing the Zika virus—this team seeks to generate critical data needed for preclinical studies that would pave the way for clinical vaccine trials.

Charles Kim | Interventional Radiology Faculty and Division Chief

Ultrasound probes were designed for diagnostic use and are thus limited when it comes to their use in needle guidance; this project seeks to develop a dedicated interventional ultrasound probe that utilizes a novel approach to image acquisition and processing, thereby optimizing needle guidance.

Maciej Mazurowski | Radiology Faculty

Using software based on an algorithm developed and tested by Duke scientists and clinicians, this team will work to create a clinical-use software prototype to evaluate knee radiographs in order to grade the severity of knee osteoarthritis. 

Samira Musah | Biomedical Engineering Faculty

Through the design and engineering of a novel microfluidic device that mimics the tissue structure and filtration system of a human kidney, Fixoria Biomimetics seeks to develop a vascularized 3D in vitro kidney model that can be used to discover novel therapeutics for human kidney disease.

Jesus del Carmen Valdiviezo Mora | Chemistry Graduate Student

Evolutionary Microfluidics looks to use AI algorithms to design, manufacture, and patent microfluidic devices that act as efficient analyzers and microreactors of biological samples, eventually commercializing these devices within the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries to reduce the time needed for research and development.

Zohair Zia | Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Student

Neptune Access makes modifications to an IV port so it can be used to obtain blood samples, reducing the need for numerous blood draws through repeated venipuncture, especially for those patients who may require multiple attempts for each successful blood sample.

Tapping into Resources and Guidance

Many of these projects have already benefited from the support of innovation- and entrepreneurship-related resources across Duke. Zohair Zia’s work on an adapted IV port won the Duke Institute for Health Innovation’s annual Innovation Jam supporting pragmatic health innovations with the potential for immediate application or possible commercialization. Soman Abraham’s new venture focused on mast cell inhibitor therapy is receiving coaching and business strategy support from a mentor-in-residence and an MBA student through the New Ventures Program run by the Office of Licensing & Ventures.

These resources, as well as the early-stage support provided by the Incubation Fund, can prove decisive in whether progress continues on a project. Charles Kim, who received an award for an interventional ultrasound probe, said, “This will provide funding for the materials and expertise needed for the crucial step of formal prototype development, without which further progress would not be possible.”

Tracking Success

Now that the Fund, which was established in 2017, is entering its fourth funding cycle, “We’re starting to be able to track the success of previous awardees, which is exciting,” says Dr. Sharlini Sankaran, Director of Translational Programs at Duke I&E.

Duke spin-out inSomaBio has gone on to receive funding from the Duke Angel Network, whereas others are in various stages of obtaining follow-on funding from investor groups or local and federal entrepreneurial funding programs.

Michael Kliën, an Associate Professor of the Practice of Dance, received an Incubation Fund award last year for his work on the Hydrean, a unique physical meditation device that encourages embodiment and teaches a systematic practice of mindfulness. The Hydrean was featured at this year’s Invented at Duke celebration—and undergraduate students in the I&E Certificate, intrigued by Kliën’s product, decided to do a business development project for their capstone class focused on getting the Hydrean adopted into mainstream media.

“The Incubation Fund fills a critical funding need for early-stage projects that need a lift to get off the ground, whether that be prototype building, early-stage market research, or obtaining critical equipment and supplies,” said Sankaran. “In keeping with Duke I&E’s mission of being a catalyst and an enabler for innovation at Duke, we’re happy to provide support to these promising projects so they can ultimately benefit society at large.”

Originally posted on the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship website

Apply for StudioDuke to Join a Creative Lab and Mentorship Program

Studio Duke.

Deadline: September 29, 2019

StudioDuke is a two-semester creative lab and mentorship program providing students the opportunity to take their advanced, ongoing creative projects to the next level of awesome. StudioDuke is a collaboration among Duke I&E, the Duke Entertainment, Media & Arts Network (DEMAN), and Duke Arts.

Students are matched with creative industry professionals (including Duke alumni) for one-on-one mentorship that kicks off on DEMAN Weekend.

Apply Now for StudioDuke! The deadline is September 29, 2019 at 11:59 p.m. EST.

Here’s how it works: Project submissions can range from advanced screenplays, films, stage plays, choreography, comedy, music composition, or performance, to fine arts, digital media, and manuscripts—many developed during independent studies and in the classroom.

Submissions will be reviewed by the StudioDuke team to be selected into an annual StudioDuke cohort. Selected projects can be pursued by students as an independent study, an experiential component of the Innovation & Entrepreneurship Certificate, or for no academic credit whatsoever.

Mentors: Each StudioDuke student will be paired with a mentor based on the nature of the project, its genre, and the industry expertise needed to shape and refine the creative venture. Student-mentor teams will work together throughout the semester and perhaps beyond to evaluate the creative potential of each project and then to edit, evolve, and elevate the work through remote and in-person creative iteration.

The goal is to bring each project to the point where it is ready to be presented to industry professionals. The StudioDuke team will help facilitate connections, travel resources, and logistics to support the project. Students will participate in programming aimed to help advance their creative projects and career opportunities.

Requirements

Mentor Dinners: Students will meet for monthly group dinners featuring mentors, DEMAN alumni, local entrepreneurs and I&E faculty to help successfully develop and promote their creative projects and navigate career interests. 

Weekly Updates: In addition to our monthly dinners, students will share weekly updates on mentor communications, progress on projects, challenges, questions, next steps, etc. with the cohort.

Mentor Check-ins: Students will connect with mentors at least once a month by email, phone, or in-person. Students will also have one-on-one check-in and strategy sessions with Amy during the semester.

Final Presentation: Students will give a five-minute, pitch-style presentation on their projects and strategies, followed by a reception at the Rubenstein Arts Center.

Schedule

Date Activity
August 28  I&E Fest: Learn about StudioDuke
September 29 StudioDuke Applications Due
October 16 StudioDuke 101 & DEMAN 101
November 1-2 StudioDuke Reunion at DEMAN Weekend
Week of December 2 Monthly Dinner
Week of January 13 Monthly Dinner
Week of February 3 Monthly Dinner
Week of March 16 Monthly Dinner
Week of April 6 StudioDuke Final Presentations & Reception

Pathways

Example of StudioDuke and I&E Certificate pathway (for undergraduates): 

First Year
Gateway elective: I&E 140 Create, Innovate, Act! OR I&E 295S Arts Entrepreneurship

Second Year
Keystone: I&E 352 Strategies for Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Third Year
Experience One (300 Hours) – StudioDuke
*Students get credit for Elective and 150-Hour Experience

Third Year Spring
Duke in LA*

Third Year Summer
Duke in Chicago* (Arts Entrepreneurship)

Fourth Year
I&E 499 Innovation & Entrepreneurship Capstone

Example of StudioDuke and AMI Certificate pathway (for undergraduates): 

First Year
AMI Gateway Course
AMI 101 Intro to Arts of the Moving Image or AMI 201 Intro to Film Studies or AMI 301 Moving Image Practice

Second Year*
300 level Practice Course

Third Year (Second Years* may also apply to Duke in LA)
Spring Semester, Duke in LA 

Apply for Distinction Project and put together Distinction Committee

Fourth Year
Fall Semester

AMI 499S Capstone

Spring Semester
Independent Study Distinction Project in conjunction with StudioDuke

StudioDuke is a collaboration between Duke I&E, DukeArts and DEMAN, and has been made possible by a generous gift from Clifford Chanler (T’82).

For more information about StudioDuke, please contact: StudioDuke@duke.edu

Innovation & Entrepreneurship Offers Incubation Grants for Idea-stage Projects

Incubation Fund.

Deadline: October 18, 2019 (extended)

Purpose

The Duke Incubation Fund (the “Fund”) was formed to support idea-stage projects at Duke University. The Fund will make a number of awards each year to support novel ideas, applied research, potential products, nascent services and creative projects that if successful, will lead to new opportunities in the market. To receive funding, projects must demonstrate a potential path to subsequent financial support, new company formation, licensing, not-for-profit partnering or other channels to enable translation.

The Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative, which administers the Fund, is interested in innovative projects that could lead to new products or services that will have a positive impact on society, including:

  • Demonstrating the feasibility of an idea or innovation for a commercial or social venture
  • Developing a working software or device prototype
  • Obtaining supporting evidence or proof-of-concept for new ideas
  • Developing new applications or markets for a technology under development
  • Creative projects that might lead to professionally produced content

Applications are welcome from all fields of inquiry. At least one member of any team must be from Duke. Awards will be contingent on the innovator entering into a Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with the Incubation Fund.

Key Dates

  • Application Submission Deadline*: September 23, 2019; extended to October 18, 2019
  • Final Selection: October 24, 2019
  • Funding Period: December 1, 2019 – November 30, 2020

*Award Cycles will typically occur twice per year (Fall & Spring). However, the Selection Committee may elect to provide seed funds to particularly compelling projects off-cycle if it deems immediate funds are warranted. Preference will be given to requests of less than $5,000. To be considered for off-cycle award, contact Judd Staples.

Eligibility

  • Proposals may be submitted by Duke faculty (tenure and non-tenure track), graduate students, postdocs, and medical residents and fellows with approval of the appropriate mentor or unit coordinator.
  • Individuals may submit more than one proposal, but are only eligible to receive one award per cycle. Promising projects that are not selected will be encouraged to reapply.
  • Funds may be spent within Duke or within a start-up company formed to commercialize the innovation. For projects without a company, one team member must establish a project-specific cost object (WBS Fund) within their department to accept award. No funds can be distributed directly to individuals.

Funding

Each award will consist of up to $20,000 (direct costs only). Preference will be given to applications with high potential for significant advancement. Funds may be spent within Duke or within a start-up company formed to commercialize the innovation.

Funding will be in the form a Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with the Duke Incubator Fund. Proceeds from the sales of the equity obtained through these agreements will used to finance future awards.

Note: This award is internally funded and does not need to be routed through the Duke Office of Research Administration (ORA). However, internal applicants should have a DPAF form to ensure accuracy of salary and effort.

Application Procedure

The Duke Incubation Fund Award uses the MyResearchProposal online application software to submit applications.

  • To apply visit http://bit.ly/myresearchproposal, click on “Create New User” (or log in if you already have an account). Proposals must be submitted under the Principal Investigator’s name.
  • A step-by-step user’s guide for applying via the MyResearchProposal software is available. Please review this document.
  • Enter Access Code I&E then select the “Duke Incubation Fund Spring 2019” funding opportunity and follow the instructions.
  • For any questions concerning MyResearchProposal passwords or system issues, please contact Anita Grissom or Kara McKelvey at myresearchproposal@duke.edu.

Applicants will enter general project information via the web-based form:

  1. Project Title, Brief Description, and Amount Requested
  2. Primary Contact Name, Department/Company, phone, email
  3. General Project Information: Applicants will be asked to answer general questions regarding the project (e.g. type of business, relationship to Duke, stage of development, ongoing sources of funding).
  4. Intellectual Property (Character Limit: 500)
  5. Compliance Plan (Character Limit: 500)

Some proposal sections will be uploaded as individual PDF files. The application sections are:

  1. Intellectual Property: Summarize intellectual property, including any know-how, invention disclosure numbers, patent filings, copyrighted material, etc. If appropriate, you will be asked to provide contact information from OLV.
  2. Budget: Upload a one-year spending plan using the I&E Budget Form.
  3. Team Experience: Include a resume or NIH Biosketches for each key member of the research team (as a single PDF). Each individual resume may not exceed 4 pages.
  4. Project Description: The Project Description should include: Idea, Background, Justification, Problem-Being- Solved, Preliminary/Supporting Data, Methods, Quarterly Milestones to be achieved during the year, and a plan for follow-on funding (5-Page limit, including tables and figures; and shorter applications are welcome). References do not count toward the 5-page limit; single spacing, font no smaller than Arial 11 and margins greater than 0.5”. The follow-on funding plan may include grant applications, internal funding, equity raises, licensing, selling product, or strategic partnerships.

Budget Guidelines

Grant funds may be budgeted for:

  • Salary support for the PI or collaborators
  • Research support personnel
  • Travel necessary to perform the research
  • Research supplies and core lab costs
  • Other purposes deemed necessary for the successful execution of the proposed project

Grant funds may not be budgeted for:

  • Company G&A
  • Legal
  • IP expense
  • Capital equipment
  • Overhead
  • Student tuition and fees

Terms of the Award

  • Approvals Required Prior to Funding Start Date: Prior to receiving funds, research involving human subjects must have appropriate approvals from the Duke IRB. If the research includes animals, the appropriate IACUC animal research forms must also be approved before the project’s start date. Failure to submit documents in the requested timeframe may result in cancellation of funding.
  • SAFE Agreement: Prior to receiving funds, applicants must complete a Simple Agreement for Future Equity (SAFE) with Incubator Fund.
  • Project Execution: Investigators agree to work in collaboration with Duke I&E and present the findings of their work at six months. Duke I&E may terminate and reallocate residual funds for any team failing to submit required written reports in a timely manner. Proposed aims of funded projects may be changed, added or deleted during the funding period, pending Investigator and Duke I&E review and agreement.The investigators will interact regularly with Duke Venture Advisors, who will serve as a resource to identify and fulfill unmet project needs via OLV, Duke I&E and other key resources. Any awardee who leaves his or her position should contact Duke I&E to discuss future plans for the project.
  • Post-Award Reporting: When requested, all awardees will be expected to provide updates that they achieved as a result of the award.

Contact Information

For additional information on this funding opportunity, contact Judd Staples (judd.staples@duke.edu).

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