Register for Free Short Courses in the Summer 2022 Duke Graduate Academy

Register now for summer 2022 short courses in the Duke Graduate Academy.

The Provost’s Office is pleased to announce a new session of the Duke Graduate Academy, which offers online short courses that introduce Duke graduate and professional students and postdoctoral fellows to skills, tools and knowledge that augment their regular coursework and research.

These short courses help emerging scholars prepare for high-level research, innovative teaching, leadership and/or public engagement.

Courses in the Duke Graduate Academy cover topics not typically included in a graduate curriculum, or provide an intensive introduction for graduate students and postdocs who might not have the time or inclination to pursue a full course in a subject. Instructors are Duke faculty as well as highly trained Duke staff and Ph.D. students.

The Graduate Academy welcomes all current/active doctoral, master’s and professional students at any stage of their studies as well as all postdoctoral fellows. There are no prerequisites for any of the courses.

Program Details

Courses

2022 Graduate Academy Summer Session Course Descriptions

The Duke Graduate Academy Summer Session courses will be offered during Duke’s Summer Sessions I and II.

Each course meets regularly for one to two weeks. Participants may register for two (2) courses. Waitlists will be used for courses that are fully enrolled.

Courses are not for credit and are not graded, but will appear on Duke graduate student transcripts. None of the offerings require prerequisites or assume areas of knowledge. Classes are offered online with synchronous and asynchronous elements. Instructors will emphasize interactive discussion and group activities/projects to maintain a high level of student engagement.

Cost

There is no cost for Duke participants.

Location

All Duke Graduate Academy classes meet online/virtually. Individual class schedules are noted in the course descriptions and in DukeHub. Meeting details and coursework materials will be confirmed by instructor email or through course Sakai sites.

Registration

Duke Student Registration — Courses are open to all current/active doctoral, master’s and professional students. Duke participants may only register for two (2) courses. Waitlists will be used for all courses. All course changes must be completed by the Add/Drop deadline for the relevant Summer Session.

Duke Postdoc Registration — Participants may only register for one (1) course. Waitlists will be used for all courses. All course changes must be completed by the Add/Drop deadline for the relevant Summer Session.

For help with enrollment and withdrawals or for more information, contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Participation, Eligibility and Enrollment

Participation in the Duke Graduate Academy is open to current Duke graduate students, including Duke law and medical students, master’s and professional students. The Graduate Academy is also open to all Duke postdocs. Space is filled on a first-come, first-served basis during registration.

Most courses will enroll 30 students, although some courses may be smaller or larger. Courses with fewer than eight enrolled students may be canceled. Course participation will appear on Duke graduate students’ transcripts.

Contact and Additional Information

For questions regarding the Duke Graduate Academy, please contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Check out these reflections from past participants:

FAQ

I will be traveling during the summer. Am I still eligible for an internship?

Though brief travel outside the internship jurisdiction is permitted, you need to be physically residing in the jurisdiction approved for Duke employment for the duration of the internship to be eligible for the opportunity. International students should confirm their visa/residency status with Duke Visa Services.

I am available for less time than the full duration of the internships to which I am applying (e.g., I am only available for 8 weeks instead of 12 weeks). Will I still be considered for selection?

Your application will still be sent to the host for consideration. Your limited availability may affect selection if timing is important to the host, though you may be able to negotiate timing for the internship if selected for an interview.

I am planning to teach a course in one of Duke’s Summer Sessions. Am I still eligible for an internship?

You are not eligible for an internship if you are teaching a Summer Session course. When offered an internship, you will be required to make a choice — to move forward with plans to teach the course or to cancel the course in order to pursue the internship opportunity. The timing around this decision may be tight (a few days) so it is important to consider your preferences in advance.

Summer 2022 Course List by Area

Courses are being offered in the following broad areas. Additional information and links are available in each area.

Technology

  • Innovation Co-Lab

Policy

  • Science Policy

Communication & Pedagogy

  • Best Practices in Mentoring
  • Science & Research Communication: Communicating Your Research to Nonexperts
  • Community-Engaged Research
  • Interdisciplinary Project Management
  • Online Teaching: Inclusive College Teaching
  • Planning and Publishing Digital Projects
  • Digital Humanities Research: Formulation to Publication
  • Digital Humanities: Working With Text
  • Public Speaking for Everyone
  • Teaching With Digital Archives

Business & Entrepreneurship

  • Leading Teams: Foundations of Teamwork & Leadership
  • Business & Organizational Fundamentals
  • Narrative Design Seminar

Interpretive Research Methods

  • Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
  • Evaluation: Understanding Impact & Improving Effectiveness
  • Introduction to Interviewing
  • Exploring Race and History in Durham, North Carolina and the South

Technology for the People

Jesús del Carmen Valdiviezo Mora, Ph.D. ’21, combines chemistry and AI for wearable tech

Person in front of computer screen.
Valdiviezo working on his computer at the Beratan Lab

Growing up in southeastern Mexico, Jesús del Carmen Valdiviezo Mora was fascinated by science and technology. He loved exploring the latest devices and finding out how they worked. As he honed his interests, the promising young scholar knew he wanted to help improve people’s lives.

“I love technology, and I like to do research,” Valdiviezo said, “but I always aim to find ways to bring ideas from journal articles to the market through companies.”

Valdiviezo has now completed his doctorate in chemistry and cofounded a company. Before leaving Duke for Berkeley, he paused to look back at his academic and entrepreneurial journey.

Participating in a science outreach event with Clubes de Ciencia Mexico (CdeCMx)

Freedom to Explore

Valdiviezo received a Fulbright scholarship to attend graduate school in the U.S. “I was looking to do computational chemistry,” he said, “but I really love to be interdisciplinary, and I wanted to work on nanoscience and biochemistry. My bachelor’s advisor, Julio Palma, pointed out the website of the Beratan Lab, and after exploring it I said, I love this research! There was a broad scope of exciting topics that David Beratan was working on.”

Pursuing his interests, Valdiviezo became inspired by the potential of artificial intelligence. He earned a master’s in electrical and computer engineering, focusing on machine learning, while working toward his Ph.D. in chemistry.

“David gave me a lot of freedom to explore opportunities to complement my research training,” said Valdiviezo. “He has been so amazing.”

Two people holding a banner that says Fubright.
With advisor David Beratan

Tapping Into Creativity

Aiming to put his scientific knowledge to use in improving lives, Valdiviezo signed up for a free short-course on entrepreneurial strategy through the Duke Graduate Academy.

Howie Rhee.
Howie Rhee, Duke I&E

Howie Rhee, managing director of student programs at Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship (I&E), encouraged his students to let the ideas flow.

“I really loved what Howie did,” Valdiviezo recalled. “Howie was like, just take a blank piece of paper, write, draw, do whatever you want. I was feeling like I was in kindergarten or elementary school, when you’re very creative and not afraid of sounding crazy or worried about how do I do this,” Valdiviezo said. He appreciated the thought process that allowed him to generate ideas, talk them through and begin to make connections.

“After Howie’s course, I got very motivated, because he did an amazing job with how he organized the course and got us exposure to startups and entrepreneurs that are also students like us.”

Controlling the Flow

Valdiviezo reached out to a college friend, Julio Fredin, who also studied chemistry and had gotten involved in microfabrication. The two discussed their shared interest in the interdisciplinary field of microfluidics, involving the manipulation and processing of fluids at a very small scale with many practical applications.

Imagine a river, Valdiviezo suggested. You can’t control water flow, but using microfluidics you can design your river and direct where things go – akin to placing large boulders in a river. This technology has been used for blood tests, for example, speeding the process of separating plasma from cells and preparing it for more careful analysis.

“We thought, this is a really good technology, so it c­ould benefit from using AI. Let’s merge the AI side to the microfluidics technology!”

Taking It Further

That fall, Valdiviezo seized the opportunity to apply to the Duke Incubation Fund. Originally run by I&E and rehomed in the Office for Translation & Commercialization, the funds are used to support early-stage ideas with commercial potential.

Recipients of the 2019-20 Duke Incubation Fund Awards.

Valdiviezo and Fredin proposed using AI to design, manufacture and patent microfluidic devices that act as efficient analyzers of biological samples. The two were able to focus their energies on developing their idea and producing a device that they could take to other investors for the next stages.

They founded their company, E-Sentience, and are now using microfluidics and AI for wearable electronics.

Tracking and Managing Stress

Sentient Skin is a wearable arm sleeve that generates a constant stream of data on stress. Image: E-Sentience LLC

“We’re focusing on the hormones that are related to stress,” Valdiviezo explained. “If you are using a wearable, let’s say a watch, you can know thanks to the sensors when you’re getting too stressed and you should take a break.” The wearable could detect stress levels by measuring sweat, which contains hormones such as cortisol.

“If you can keep track of cortisol in real time, that can give you a profile of how your stress levels have been throughout the day or through the week,” said Valdiviezo. “We can use that information, combining it with AI to create models that can describe or predict how you’re going to be feeling, for example, in two days, if you continue with this routine or if you take a break, and how long the break should be to get back to your normal levels, to prevent complications like cardiac diseases or something that could come as a consequence of having a lot of stress.”

A wearable device could make this health-improving data broadly accessible, Valdiviezo emphasized. “That’s our goal. We want to have this technology for the people.”

Prestigious Fellowship

This spring, Valdiviezo received a national CIFellows award to work at the intersection of chemistry and AI, studying novel chemical reactivity in aqueous droplets. He’ll head to the University of California, Berkeley, in January.

“One of the cool things about the fellowship is that you have a flexibility that you wouldn’t normally have” he said. “That will give me the opportunity to spend time working on the company and taking it to the next level with my team.”

To build teamwork and leadership skills, Valdiviezo took part in The Graduate School’s Emerging Leaders Institute, a professional development program for Duke grad students and postdocs. From left: Valdiviezo, Shreyas Hegde, facilitator Kristin Murphy, Assistant Dean Melissa Bostrom, Brad Barth, Courtney Johnson

Before then, he’s wrapping up work in the lab and continuing to make progress with his company, which will be based in North Carolina.

Valdiviezo credits Beratan for encouraging him to explore other areas besides his current research. “Otherwise, I wouldn’t see myself going to the Graduate Academy or working on the company,” he said. “I was thinking about the things I’ve done here at Duke, and I’m very grateful to have had all those experiences and met so many amazing people. I like to call this place my home, and I’m going to miss it a lot.”

Duke Graduate Academy logo.The Duke Graduate Academy offers free short-courses to help graduate students and postdocs expand their skill sets and prepare for a wide range of careers. Created as an element of the Together Duke academic strategic plan, the academy launched in 2018. Read reflections from participants and instructors. Courses in the academy’s Summer Session 2022 will be announced in the spring.

By Sarah Dwyer, Duke Interdisciplinary Studies

Register for Short Courses in the 2021 Duke Graduate Academy Summer Session

Duke Graduate Academy logo.

Deadline: May 14, 2021

Together Duke is pleased to announce a new session of the Duke Graduate Academy, which offers online short courses that introduce Duke graduate and professional students and postdoctoral fellows to skills, tools and knowledge that augment their regular coursework and research. These short courses help emerging scholars prepare for high-level research, innovative teaching, leadership and/or public engagement.

Courses in the Duke Graduate Academy cover topics not typically included in a graduate curriculum, or provide an intensive introduction for graduate students and postdocs who might not have the time or inclination to pursue a full course in a subject. Instructors are Duke faculty as well as highly trained Duke staff and Ph.D. students.

The Graduate Academy welcomes all doctoral, master’s and professional students at any stage of their studies and all postdoctoral fellows. There are no prerequisites for any of the courses.

Program Details

Courses

2021 Graduate Academy Summer Session Course Descriptions

Students taking selected courses may qualify for Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) credit. See course descriptions.

Dates

The Duke Graduate Academy Summer Session courses will be offered May 17 – 28 and June 7 – 18, 2021. Each course meets regularly for 1 – 2 weeks.

Courses are not for credit, but will appear on Duke graduate student transcripts. All courses are graded pass/fail. None of the offerings require prerequisites or assume areas of knowledge. Classes are offered online with synchronous and asynchronous elements. Instructors will emphasize interactive discussion and group activities/projects to maintain a high level of student engagement.

Cost

There is no cost for Duke participants.

Location

All Graduate Academy classes meet online/virtually. Individual class schedules are noted in the course descriptions and in DukeHub. Meeting details will be confirmed by instructor email or through course Sakai sites.

Registration

Duke Student Registration

Duke Postdoc Registration

Participants may only register for one (1) course. Waitlists will be used for all courses. Add/Drop for the Graduate Academy Summer Session ends May 14, 2021.

For help or for more information, contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Participation, Eligibility and Enrollment

Participation in the Duke Graduate Academy is open to Duke graduate students, including Duke law and medical students, master’s and professional students. The Graduate Academy is also open to all Duke postdocs. Space is filled on a first-come, first-served basis during registration.

Most courses will enroll 30 students, although some courses may be smaller or larger. Courses with fewer than 8 enrolled students may be canceled. Course participation will appear on Duke graduate students’ transcripts.

Contact and Additional Information

For questions regarding the Duke Graduate Academy please contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Learn More

Check out reflections from past participants: What I Got Out of the Duke Graduate Academy

What I Got Out of the Duke Graduate Academy

Free short-courses help graduate students and postdocs expand their skill sets and prepare for a wide range of careers
Elizabeth Schrader.
Duke University Ph.D. candidate Elizabeth Schrader (Photo: Megan Mendenhall)

When Elizabeth Schrader signed up for a free short-course in the summer of 2019, the doctoral candidate in religion had no idea it would have an immediate impact on her scholarship.

Two years earlier, Schrader published an article arguing that early Christian copyists may have altered the Gospel of John to minimize the role of Mary Magdalene. This was an important finding, but it wasn’t getting the attention in scholarly circles that she’d hoped for.

“Although my work had appeared in a prestigious journal (the Harvard Theological Review), the article was hidden behind a paywall,” she explained. “This meant that few people could actually read it, so it was difficult to spread the news about my work.”

Schrader enrolled in a week-long course on digital publishing, led by librarians Liz Milewicz and Dave Hansen as part of the Duke Graduate Academy.

“Thanks to the course, I learned about the importance of open access,” Schrader said. “With Liz and Dave’s guidance, I looked at my publisher agreement and discovered there was a legal way to make my work available to the general public. Liz then introduced me to a writer at University Communications, Eric Ferreri, who wrote about my work in Duke Today and pitched the story to national news outlets. The story was picked up by Religion News Service; that’s when my research really started to gain traction.”

Manuscript.
Schrader found subtle inconsistencies in the 12th-century manuscript in Duke’s Rubenstein Library. (Photo: Julie Schoonmaker)

Beyond the media attention and increased readership, Schrader was able to bring her work into the public conversation through discussion forums and speaking engagements. (See the open access article.) “I owe so much to Liz and Dave!” she enthused.

Duke Graduate Academy logo.Created as an element of the Together Duke academic strategic plan with the goal of enhancing students’ preparation for careers in academia or outside of it, the Duke Graduate Academy launched in 2018 as a free summer program. In the summer of 2020, all eight courses (virtual due to the pandemic) were filled within minutes. Responding to the demand, the university opened up a second session of ten courses. In total, 483 graduate students and postdocs were able to enroll, with 335 remaining on waitlists.

In December and January, the academy expanded to include a winter session for the first time. Taking advantage of nine courses, 182 graduate students and postdocs enrolled.

Read selected reflections from participants and instructors:

Entrepreneurial Strategy

Kelly Tang.Kelly Tang, Ph.D. in Art History

“The week has been really amazing. I think the best resource has been getting to know Howie [Rhee, Managing Director of Student Programs, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship] and seeing how he thinks about problems. It’s very eye-opening to see the way that he approaches different student ideas and projects. I feel strongly that this class has really opened my mind to different career paths and actually given me more hopefulness […] about job hunting in the future. I feel like I’ve been invigorated during a challenging time.”

Sachal Dhillon.Sachal Dhillon, M.S.E. in Electrical and Computer Engineering

“This has been an incredibly profound experience, not only learning about entrepreneurship but more importantly being able to see how others think about it and how they approached the subject. It’s very easy to think about something in a bubble, but to really sell a product or an idea you need to understand how others are lensing it through their own experience.”

Teaching with Archives

Bill Sharman.Bill Sharman, Ph.D. in History

“This short course introduced us to ways of ‘teaching with archives’ in undergraduate courses that we may teach in the future, and specifically to some of the amazing resources right here on campus in Duke’s library and special collections.

“One of the big takeaways was that when students have an opportunity to encounter historical documents—rare manuscripts, letters that soldiers wrote home, old advertising posters and maps, anything really—history comes alive in new and exciting ways that differ from the history encountered in scholarly publications.

“In other words, there’s a world of difference between giving students a medieval manuscript to contemplate and asking them to read a scholarly book about medieval science, literature or history. Both are important, but letting students do the ‘real work’ of researching and interpreting historical documents allows them to do creative projects and ask questions that interest them.”

Joseph Mulligan.Joseph Mulligan, Ph.D. in Romance Studies

“The academy was an attractive option for me to build on the departmental pedagogy course required by Romance Studies, since I wanted to see how instruction was being envisioned by our colleagues in other disciplines. Teaching with Archives showed me that putting students in contact with archival materials can create conditions favorable to shared inquiry and the exploration of research methods.”

Following the academy, Mulligan received a grant from Duke Libraries in which he applied his growing knowledge. “My Archival Expeditions project was focused on a service learning program in 1930s Spain. I was able to acquire archival materials (regional transcriptions of frontier ballads) used in these “Pedagogical Missions,” which would invite students to engage those poems as aesthetic objects and at the same time to ask why such materials and not others were chosen for the education reform program.”

Leading Teams

Jean-François Paquet.Jean-François Paquet, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Physics

“I have to lead teams a fair amount now, as a senior postdoc, when supervising student projects or leading a working group in a multi-institution collaboration. It is not something I was trained for in any way, and it can be very challenging! So I thought I’d take advantage of this course, because it became clear to me that limited leadership skills can have negative effects on the team. On the flip side, the benefits of better leadership skills can be far-reaching and everybody in the team gains from it.”

Katharine Thomas.Katharine Thomas, M.S. in Global Health

“The winter break is really long, and I was thinking that this is a great opportunity to use Duke’s resources to improve myself. This will come on my transcript when I graduate, so I’ll be able to say I did a leadership course and that will help me with my future career goals.”

Planning and Publishing Digital Projects

Grace Beggs.Grace Beggs, Ph.D. in Biochemistry

“I am currently working on another writing project based on my dissertation research and have developed a plan for publishing and communicating this work based on what I learned in the course. Specifically, I intend to strategically select keywords to make my work more discoverable via search engines, promote my work through virtual conference meetings and track how accessible my work is to my target audience via online analytics. These are just a few of the topics covered in the class, which I recommend to anyone who is interested in learning how to effectively and efficiently communicate their work online.”

Science Policy

Buz Waitzkin.Buz Waitzkin, Deputy Director, Duke Initiative for Science & Society; Duke Graduate Academy Course Instructor

“This year we experienced a dramatic increase in the number of Ph.D. students interested in exploring how science policy is developed and regulated. There has probably never been a time when we have watched science policy formulated on prime time television and it was clear that students want to better understand how the system does and should work.”

Front End Web Development

Sandra Bermond.Sandra Bermond, Program Manager, Innovation Co-Lab; Duke Graduate Academy Course Instructor

“Several students showed me their work as we went. They created a variety of pages, from portfolios to destination keepsakes, all very different in their styling and content, but all very well thought-out and pleasing to look at. I am very confident that most of the students who attended this course will continue to create websites for themselves, their friends and potentially their schools, and continue to learn web development as they do so. It was a pleasure to teach motivated individuals who had excellent questions throughout the week, and I look forward to doing it again!”

Summer 2021

We will announce the Duke Graduate Academy Summer Session 2021 in March. Here’s a preview of the short-courses that will be offered:

  • Interdisciplinary Project ManagementTogether Duke logo.
  • Online Teaching
  • Science Policy
  • Science/Research Communication
  • Intro to Qualitative Research Methods
  • Community-Engaged Research
  • Leading Teams
  • Best Practices in Mentoring
  • Teaching with Digital Archives
  • Public Speaking Skills for a Virtual World
  • Landscape of Higher Education
  • Business & Organization Fundamentals
  • Narrative Design
  • Digital Humanities Research

Duke Graduate Summer Academy Offers Second Session of Free Online Short Courses

Graduate Summer Academy.

Update: The 2020 Duke Graduate Summer Academy will offer a second session of online short courses. Registration is open from June 8 to June 17 at noon. Please feel free to contact Amy Feistel (amy.feistel@duke.edu) with questions.

Please see the 2020 Graduate Summer Academy Course Descriptions and registration page.

About the Duke Graduate Summer Academy

Together Duke is pleased to announce the Duke Graduate Summer Academy, which offers online short courses that introduce Duke graduate students (both doctoral and masters) and postdoctoral fellows to skills, tools, and knowledge that augment their regular coursework/research. These short courses help emerging scholars prepare for high-level research, innovative teaching, leadership, and/or public engagement.

Courses in the Duke Graduate Summer Academy cover topics not typically included in a graduate curriculum, or that provide an intensive introduction for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who might not have the time or inclination to pursue a full course in a subject. Instructors are Duke faculty members as well as highly trained Duke staff members.

The Graduate Summer Academy welcomes all doctoral and masters students at any stage of their studies and all postdoctoral fellows. There are no prerequisites for any of the courses.

Courses

The Duke Graduate Summer Academy Session II courses will be offered June 22 through July 10, 2020.

Each course meets for up to three hours per day for 1 – 2 weeks. Space permitting, participants may register for one (1) course. Waitlists will be used and students will be notified if they are moved from a waitlist to active course enrollment.

Courses are not for credit, but will appear on Duke graduate student transcripts. None of the offerings require prerequisites or assume areas of knowledge. Courses are offered online with synchronous and asynchronous elements. Instructors will emphasize interactive discussion and group activities/projects to maintain a high level of student engagement.

Cost

There will be no cost for Duke participants.

Location

All Graduate Summer Academy classes meet online/virtually. Individual class schedules are noted in the course descriptions. Meeting details will be confirmed by email or through the Graduate Summer Academy Sakai site.

Registration

Registration is open June 8 to June 17 at noon.

Please see the registration page. For help or for more information, contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Participation, Eligibility, and Enrollment

Participation in the Duke Graduate Summer Academy is open to Duke doctoral students, including Duke law and medical students, postdocs, and master’s students with space filled on a first-come, first-served basis during the registration window detailed above.

Course participation will appear on Duke graduate students’ transcripts. Most classes will enroll 30 students, although some classes may be smaller or larger. Classes with fewer than 8 enrolled students will be canceled.

Contact and Additional Information

For questions regarding the Duke Graduate Summer Academy, please contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu. Visit strategicplan.duke.edu/graduate-summer-academy for answers to frequently asked questions. We offer the following reflections from past participants:

Register for Free Online Short Courses at the 2020 Duke Graduate Summer Academy

Graduate Summer Academy.

Update: The 2020 Duke Graduate Summer Academy has been relaunched with online short courses. Registration is open from May 1-15, 2020. Please feel free to contact Amy Feistel (amy.feistel@duke.edu) with questions.

Together Duke is pleased to announce the Duke Graduate Summer Academy, which offers online short courses that introduce Duke graduate students (both doctoral and masters) and postdoctoral fellows to skills, tools, and knowledge that augment their regular coursework/research. These short courses help emerging scholars prepare for high-level research, innovative teaching, leadership, and/or public engagement.

Courses in the Duke Graduate Summer Academy cover topics not typically included in a graduate curriculum, or that provide an intensive introduction for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who might not have the time or inclination to pursue a full course in a subject. Instructors are Duke faculty members as well as highly trained Duke staff members.

The Graduate Summer Academy welcomes all doctoral and masters students at any stage of their studies and all postdoctoral fellows. There are no prerequisites for any of the courses.

Courses

Please see the 2020 Graduate Summer Academy Course Descriptions.

Each course meets for up to three hours per day for 1-2 weeks. Space permitting, participants may register for up to two courses.

Courses are not for credit, but will appear on Duke graduate student transcripts. None of the offerings require prerequisites or assume areas of knowledge. Courses are offered online with synchronous and asynchronous elements. Instructors will emphasize interactive discussion and group activities/projects to maintain a high level of student engagement.

The Duke Graduate Summer Academy .will be offered May 18 through June 5, 2020. Additional offerings may be added during the summer, dependent on availability and interest.

Cost

There will be no cost for Duke attendees.

Location

All Graduate Summer Academy classes meet online/virtually. Individual class schedules are noted in the course descriptions. Meeting details will be confirmed by email.

Registration

Registration is open May 1-15, 2020. For help or for more information, contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Participation, Eligibility, and Enrollment

Participation in the Duke Graduate Summer Academy is open to Duke doctoral students, including Duke law and medical students, postdocs, and masters students with space filled on a first-come, first-served basis during the registration window detailed above. Course participation will appear on Duke graduate students’ transcripts. Most classes will enroll 30 students, although some classes may be smaller or larger. Classes with fewer than 8 enrolled students will be canceled.

Contact and Additional Information

For questions regarding the Duke Graduate Summer Academy, please contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu. Visit strategicplan.duke.edu/graduate-summer-academy for answers to frequently asked questions. We offer the following reflections from past participants: