Duke Global Health Institute Invites Faculty-in-Residence Proposals for 2020-2021

Faculty-in-Residence Program.

Deadline: September 30, 2019 (Letter of Intent)

Introduction

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) invites proposals for the Faculty-in-Residence Program for the 2020-2021 academic year. This program will support the career development of a faculty abroad, and further strengthen collaboration at a selected partner location.

Eligibility Criteria

Eligible candidates include a faculty member who holds a primary or secondary appointment at DGHI. Priority shall be given to an assistant professor (regardless of when the terminal degree was obtained), or an associate professor who has completed his or her terminal research degree or postgraduate medical training within the past 10 years (by submission of application).

A faculty member interested in applying should be prepared to commit a minimum of one academic semester, to one year. Preference will be given to those faculty who commit to staying up to a year.

Purpose and Objectives

In addition to advancing the faculty member’s research, the Faculty-in-Residence Program is intended to promote bilateral efforts, facilitate communication and partner collaboration, examine local challenges and capacity, and help expand research activities. This approach prioritizes active partnership and coordination. It is expected that 65% effort will be devoted to research activities, and 35% effort will be focused on promoting education and identifying strategic opportunities to advance collaboration.

Program objectives include:

  • Advance research and teaching opportunities by the faculty member
  • Work with DGHI and partners to deepen research and education collaboration
  • Mentor one or more MScGH students

Program Locations

Applications requesting to carry out the Faculty-in-Residence Program at the Priority Partnership Locations (PPLs) will be given priority. For more information on PPLs, please visit https://globalhealth.duke.edu/priority-partnership-locations. This will allow DGHI to continue to invest in sustainable and mutually beneficial partnerships with our host institutions. However, other locations in low- and middle-income countries will be considered on a case-by case basis. If you are interested in applying for this program, please speak with Sarah Cao (sarah.cao@duke.edu) prior to submission of the Letter of Intent to discuss interest and your proposed location.

Award Information and Terms and Conditions

  • Award period and duration: minimum of one fall or spring semester; maximum 12 months (total of time abroad). The earliest date the program may begin is July 2020.
  • Allowable budget items: partial salary and fringe benefits, visa, vaccinations, one round-trip economy airfare, housing stipend, and modest language training and project-related expenses. Salary support is negotiable, and DGHI leadership can discuss appointment terms in more detail with applicant’s Dean or Faculty Chair if requested. See the budget section below for more funding details.
  • Dependent airfare: DGHI will cover the cost of one round-trip economy class return trip per member of the household (spouse and legal dependents) if member(s) accompany the faculty member no less than 80% of the duration of the visit.
  • Education allowance for K-12 children: may be allowable depending on Duke employee eligibility. Faculty must meet the requirements, which includes long-term assignment of a minimum of one year.
  • A final progress report within three months after returning to Duke. This includes:
    1. Description of key partnering institutions and individual collaborators and the significance and potential for further collaborations fostered by the partnership
    2. Description of research and teaching activities and how these have strengthened DGHI partnership and contributed to the overall mission of DGHI
    3. Description of how the experience has shaped her/his future career plans

Required Application Information

Applicants should provide specific goals and outline proposed activities with partners, describing how these goals and activities will meet program objectives. Mentorship is required throughout the program to help identify the strategic objectives that would be the most beneficial for partnership-building. In addition, the application narrative should describe anticipated challenges and potential approaches to meeting those challenges, how the proposed activities will enhance the applicant’s career development, and plans for mentorship.

Key Dates

  • Letter of Intent due date: September 30, 2019
  • Application due date: November 8, 2019
  • Notification of award: November 22, 2019

Letter of Intent

No more than three pages to include the following information:

  • Summary of project statement, goals and objectives: include proposed length of time overseas (the dates must correspond with the RFP), and proposed location of research
  • Proposed outcomes and sustainability
  • General description of project funding needs during the stay

Submission Format: Please submit the Letter of Intent via email to sarah.cao@duke.edu with the subject line “Faculty in Residence Program Letter of Intent” no later than September 30, 2019.

Application Content

The review committee will contact you after a Letter of Intent has been submitted. If you are invited to continue with the application process, a full application will be due no later than November 8, 2019. Please include the following information and supporting documents and save as one PDF file.

  • Cover page including the following information (1 page):
    • Project title
    • Name, title, departmental affiliation, mailing address, e-mail address, and telephone number
  • Proposal (3 page maximum – single spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:
    • Detailed project statement, including plan for research activities, schedule, and anticipated milestones (not described in letter of intent). Include your existing relationship with your partner(s)
    • Identify your plan to strengthen collaboration, address specific challenges, and build capacity
  • Budget: Funding is intended to provide partial salary support and fringe benefits, economy travel, vaccinations, visa, housing stipend, language training, and project-related expenses. Dependent travel and education allowance may be allowable if eligible.
  • Summarize all estimated project expenses and provide an explanation for each line item proposed in the budget.
Allowable Expenses
Salary / fringe
Travel (round-trip economy airfare, vaccinations, visa)
Dependent travel, if eligible
Housing stipend
Project expenses and language training
Child education allowance – if eligible, per Duke policy
  • Unallowable costs include those deemed unallowable by Duke policy. For consultation on the budget, please contact Sarah Cao.
  • Applicants who receive alternative funding after submission of the application may resubmit the budget.
  • Updated CV.
  • Two letters of support:
    1. Faculty lead and/or mentor of the Partnership Location if you propose a PPL. The letter should include willingness from both the faculty champion and the partnering site to accept the faculty member, and a willingness from the mentor to help guide the faculty member during duration of the program.
    2. Department Head or Division Chief (if primary DGHI faculty, please request letter of support from Chris Plowe, Director, Duke Global Health Institute).
  • Submission Format: Please submit the application via email to cao@duke.edu with the subject line “Faculty in Residence Program Application” no later than November 8, 2019.

Program Contact

For questions regarding eligibility requirements, program guidelines, or application process, please contact Sarah Cao.

Duke Global Health Doctoral Scholar Receives Young Leader Award

Mercy Asiedu.

Mercy Asiedu, a fifth-year PhD candidate in biomedical engineering, received the CUGH/Wasserheit Young Leader Award at the 10th annual Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) Conference in Chicago earlier this month. Asiedu, a global health doctoral scholar at the Duke Global Health Institute, conducts research centered on using light to detect cancer in low-resource areas.

The CUGH/Wasserheit Young Leader Award is given to an individual under 30 years old who has demonstrated strong leadership abilities, established collaborations with colleagues in resource-poor settings, and shown outstanding achievement in addressing health disparities through education, research, advocacy and/or service.

Working under the mentorship of Nimmi Ramanujam, the Robert W. Carr Professor of Biomedical Engineering and a Duke Global Health Institute faculty member, Asiedu has pioneered the development of a speculum-free colposcope that transforms the conventional gynecological exam. Leveraging her background in mechanical engineering, she created the Callascope, an inexpensive device that connects with a smartphone to deliver images of the cervix comparable to a traditional $15,000 colposcope.

Asiedu has conducted volunteer and clinical studies to demonstrate the clinical impact of the Callascope, and she is developing machine learning algorithms for automated cervical cancer detection. She has also garnered funding to implement the Callascope in Ghana, her home country. In addition to her research and product development work, Asiedu is coleading an art campaign with her peers to use the Callascope to change the narrative on shame and invisibility in order to mobilize women to seek cervical cancer screening.

“I am very grateful to have received this award,” said Asiedu. “Biomedical engineering appealed to me because I recognized technology as a limiting factor for healthcare in places like Ghana, where I am from. My doctoral thesis on developing technologies for cervical cancer screening to address health inequalities combined with my global health certificate and fellowship have really given me the chance to start working towards addressing these issues.”

This award marks the second time Asiedu was recognized by CUGH for her leadership. At the 2018 conference, she received the Drs. Anvar and Pari Velji Emerging Leader in Global Health Innovation Student/Trainee Award.

“I’m delighted that Mercy won this award,” said Ramanujam. “She has the creativity, tenacity and leadership skills to transform women’s health.”

By Susan Gallagher; originally posted on the Duke Global Health Institute website

Duke Global Health Institute Offers Funding for Strategic Investment Colloquia

DGHI funding.

Deadline: April 15, 2019 (rolling review)

Opportunity

Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) faculty are invited to request funding to convene colloquia for the purpose of defining opportunities for new joint faculty recruitments or other new investments related to the research objectives in the 2019-2024 Strategic Plan.

Eligibility

DGHI faculty, from any discipline, are eligible to propose colloquia. Groups of at least 5 participating faculty are eligible to apply. DGHI faculty must be the Primary Convener(s) and colloquia must include faculty from at least two or more different Schools, Institutes, Centers and/or Departments, and, if justified, from other partner organizations.

Funding

Awards of up to $2,500 will be provided to support each successful proposal. Funds can be used to cover the cost of food, meeting venue, external speakers or other meeting costs.

Successful proposals will be submitted by groups of faculty who self-aggregate around a shared bold global health research idea that will make a significant impact on improving health equity in one or more of three broad research areas articulated in the Strategic Plan: Disease Elimination and Eradication, the Rising Burden of Non-Communicable Diseases, and/or the Environment and Health. Investments may also focus on cross-cutting approaches in Innovation, Policy, Science and/or Technology related to the three research areas. We encourage cross-cutting investments that are applicable to more than one discipline or topic (e.g. something that would aid both malaria and cervical cancer elimination). Both the research areas and cross-cutting approaches are intended to be broadly defined—e.g. Science may include anything from genomics to implementation science to sociobehavioral science.

Preference will be given to proposals that present a plan to convene colloquia that aim to define a recruitment strategy for a specific type of faculty candidate jointly with one or more Duke School, Institutes, Center and/or Department. Faculty recruitments (or other investments) that jointly advance the educational missions of DGHI and other Duke partners will also be given preference. Colloquia participants are encouraged to “think big” and not be constrained at the outset by anticipating a specific level of funding for proposed investments.

In addition to joint faculty recruitments, colloquia may develop proposals for other types of investments, including but not limited to infrastructure, major equipment, or staff hires.

Proposals

Proposals for colloquia will be accepted and reviewed on a rolling basis, with awards starting as early as March 15 through April 15. Colloquia should be held no later than May 15, and proposals for strategic investments should be submitted by June 1.

Proposals for colloquia should be submitted to Kelly Deal (Kelly.deal@duke.edu) as a single PDF and should include:

  • Brief (maximum two-page) narrative that articulates the area of shared intellectual interest and the question or problem the colloquium aims to address
  • Indication whether the proposal reflects a nascent or continuing collaboration; if continuing, a brief explanation of the activities to date
  • Proposed budget for the colloquium
  • Listing of the proposed colloquium participants and their affiliations
  • 5 page CV or NIH Biosketch for the DGHI faculty convener(s) of the colloquium

Review and Selection

Proposals will be evaluated on a rolling basis based on the potential to build collaborations in exciting intellectual areas for the Duke Global Health Institute that will have a meaningful impact on health equity and that add value to the larger Duke community.

The intent is that the collective set of award recipients will reflect the richness of intellectual approaches and modes of inquiry that make Duke such a vibrant university and will help DGHI move quickly to implement research objectives of the new Strategic Plan.

Expected Outputs of Funded Colloquia

Each funded colloquium will produce a detailed proposal for strategic investment that describes:

  • Details of the specific investment (e.g. joint faculty recruitment, infrastructure )
  • Research goal/question and anticipated impact on health equity in a community or population
  • Other expected results and benefits for DGHI, other Duke partners and community partners
  • How the investment fits with DGHI’s strategic plan and strategic plans and priorities of Duke University, Duke Health, and/or other Duke Schools, Institutes, Centers and/or Departments
  • Timeline
  • Estimated budget

These investment proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis and decisions on a first round of new investments will be made this summer. Calls for proposals for a second round of investments may be issued 1-2 years from now.

Interdisciplinary Teams of Faculty Can Apply for Global Health Pilot Research Grants

Global Health pilot research RFP.

Deadline: May 1, 2019

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) invites interdisciplinary teams led by DGHI faculty to submit research proposals in an area of interest and/or priority for global health, that aim to achieve impact in strategic priority areas identified in the 2019-2024 Strategic Plan. Through this RFP, DGHI seeks to provide pilot funds to stimulate interdisciplinary research collaborations, with the larger goal of enabling investigators to leverage preliminary findings and data to obtain larger awards of external funding.

Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals are required. Teams including new investigators, investigators new to global health, investigators from two or more Duke schools, institutes, centers, or departments, and/or investigators from low and middle-income countries, are encouraged.

DGHI is looking for global health research ideas that will make a significant impact on improving health equity in one or more of three broad research areas articulated in the Strategic Plan: Disease Elimination and Eradication, the Rising Burden of Non-Communicable Diseases, and/or the Environment and Health. Investments may also focus on cross-cutting approaches in Innovation, Policy, Science and/or Technology related to the three research areas. We encourage cross-cutting investments that are applicable to more than one discipline or topic (e.g. something that would aid both malaria and cervical cancer elimination). Both the research areas and cross-cutting approaches are intended to be broadly defined—e.g., Science may include anything from genomics to implementation science to sociobehavioral science. Proposals that support and describe a sustainable line of global health research will be prioritized.

Eligible Applicants

DGHI faculty are eligible to apply for funding. Proposals that include collaborators from other institutions or elsewhere at Duke are encouraged, but the PI must be DGHI faculty.

Budgets

The budget may include: supplies, support for technicians, research assistants, and graduate students; research-related travel; and other justifiable and allowable research expenses. Faculty salary, travel to scientific meetings, and indirect costs are not allowable expenses. Applicants may apply for up to

$25,000 for a 12-month project. Smaller proposals for shorter periods are also encouraged.

Application Requirements

Proposals must be for activities in low, lower-middle, and upper-middle-income countries (a listing of eligible countries can be found at the World Bank website; if you wish to propose a global health project that does not include LMIC activities, please contact John Bartlett to discuss and receive approval). Applicants are encouraged to identify collaborating in-country investigators, and should describe plans for how the results generated will be applied to future external funding, as this will be an important criterion in the review.

Cover Page. Must include the following information:

  • Proposal title
  • Name, title, departmental affiliation, address, email address, and telephone number of all proposed investigators
  • Designation of a Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigators

Abstract (250 words maximum)

Research Plan (3 page maximum; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Statement of research objectives
  • Significance of the research (including significance to DGHI and/or Global Health and to low and middle-income countries )
  • Proposed methods and plans for data analysis (specific details recommended)
  • Work already completed related to the proposed work (if relevant)
  • Description of the research team and research setting, including in-country collaboration plan
  • Potential for future external grant support

Appendix Materials (1 page maximum each; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Research timeline and milestones
  • Letter of support from a collaborating researcher in a low or middle-income country

Budget and Justification (1 page maximum)

NIH Biosketch OR Curriculum Vitae

  • Include current grant support and limit to 5 pages for each investigator

Submission Format

Please combine all required elements into a single pdf document and submit via email to kelly.deal@duke.edu with the subject line of “DGHI Pilot Grant Submission.”

Schedule

Application receipt date: May 1, 2019

Project start date: July 1, 2019

Inquiries

We welcome the opportunity to answer questions from potential applicants. Please submit inquires related to this funding announcement to:

Kelly Deal, MPH

Assistant Director, Research Duke Global Health Institute

Telephone (919) 681-7159, Email: kelly.deal@duke.edu

Pilot Funding Available for Collaborative Global Health Research in India

Funding opportunity for research in India.

Deadline: March 18, 2019

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) invites research proposals building collaborative interdisciplinary research between DGHI investigators and partners in India. Our goal is to enable investigators to leverage preliminary findings and pilot data to obtain larger awards of external funding.

Eligible Applicants

Proposal teams must include at least one DGHI faculty, and one researcher from India. Proposals including two or more collaborating sites are encouraged. Proposals may include collaborators from other institutions as well. Junior faculty and faculty new to global health are strongly encouraged to submit proposals.

Budgets

The budget may include: supplies; publication costs; salary support for technicians, research assistants, and graduate students; research related travel; and other justifiable research expenses. Faculty salary, travel to scientific meetings and indirect costs are not allowable expenses. Applicants may apply for up to $25,000 for one year. Smaller proposals for shorter periods are also encouraged.

Application Requirements

Applications must propose global health work in India. Applicants should describe plans for how the results generated will be applied to obtain future external funding.

Cover page must include the following information:

  • Proposal title
  • Name, title, departmental affiliation, address, e-mail address, and telephone number of all proposed investigators
  • Designation of a Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigators

Abstract (250 words maximum)

Research plan (3 page maximum – single spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Statement of scientific objectives and their significance
  • Relevance to mission of the DGHI
  • Applicability of project goals to India
  • Proposed methods and plans for data analysis (specific details recommended)
  • Work already completed related to the proposed work (if relevant)
  • Description of the research team and research setting, including in-country collaboration plan
  • Potential for future grant support

Appendix materials (1 page maximum each– single spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Research schedule and milestones
  • Letter of support from a collaborating researcher/Institution in India

Budget and justification (1 page maximum)

Curriculum vitae OR NIH biosketch for each investigator including current grant support and limited to five pages for each investigator.

Submission Format

Please combine all required elements into a single pdf document and submit via email to kelly.deal@duke.edu with the subject line of “DGHI India Pilot Grant Submission.”

Schedule

Application receipt date: March 18, 2019

Project start date: July 1, 2019

Inquiries

We welcome the opportunity to answer questions from potential applicants. For advice about overseas sites where projects could be undertaken, linkages with potential overseas collaborators, advice on preparing budgets for international projects, and questions about biostatistical support, please contact: Kelly Deal, MPH, Assistant Director, Research Duke Global Health Institute, (919) 681-7159, kelly.deal@duke.edu

Faculty to Pursue Collaborations through 2019 Intellectual Community Planning Grants

ICPG 2019.

A key goal of Together Duke is to invest in faculty as scholars and leaders of the university’s intellectual communities. To foster collaboration around new and emerging areas of interest, Intellectual Community Planning Grants (ICPG) are available to groups of faculty.

These grants cover the cost of food, meeting venues, external speakers or other meeting costs, and exploratory research into potential collaborators at Duke and elsewhere. The offices of the Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies and the Executive Vice Provost oversee this seed grant program.

For the 2019 calendar year, eight groups received Intellectual Community Planning Grants ranging from $1,000 to $5,000.

Big Data and Social Interactions

Big Data and Social Interactions faculty members.

This group will facilitate interactions among faculty who want to learn how technological advancements and big data can improve our understanding of the ways in which social norms and interactions affect individuals’ and firms’ behavior. The primary goal is to produce sustained interactions and research papers capable of being published in leading scholarly journals. A kick-off event will include a visiting speaker. Subsequent meetings will invite faculty to provide overviews of recent research and discuss new ideas; review colleagues’ early-stage research ideas; and share early work with a guest speaker who is a pioneer in the field.

  • Lead: Jillian Grennan, Fuqua School of Business
  • Chris Bail, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Sanford School of Public Policy
  • Ines Black, Fuqua School of Business, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Ofer Eldar, Law School, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Sarah Gaither, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Sharique Hasan, Fuqua School of Business, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Rachel Kranton, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • David Robinson, Fuqua School of Business, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative

Building Duke’s Community of Theoretical Chemists via a Summer Undergraduate Research Program

Building Duke’s Community of Theoretical Chemists via a Summer Undergraduate Research Program faculty members.

An emerging community of theoretical chemists at Duke is spread across schools and departments. This group has begun to organize a Summer Undergraduate Research Program in Theoretical Chemistry, which will help strengthen the pool of graduate student applicants from North America. The Intellectual Community Planning Grant will enable the participation of more faculty (those who could not fully fund a student on their own) and support team-building excursions. All faculty will present multiple seminars and mentor the summer undergraduate researchers.

  • Lead: David Beratan, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke University Energy Initiative
  • Hashim Al-Hashimi, School of Medicine
  • Volker Blum, Pratt School of Engineering, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke University Energy Initiative
  • Patrick Charbonneau, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Stephen Craig, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke University Energy Initiative
  • Bruce Randall Donald, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke Center for Genomic and Computational Biology
  • Jianfeng Lu, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Michael Rubinstein, Pratt School of Engineering, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Warren S. Warren, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine
  • Weitao Yang, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke University Energy Initiative

Exploring STEAM (Science, Arts, and Humanities) at Duke

Exploring STEAM at Duke members.

A working group of Duke faculty, staff, administrators, and students will explore overlapping and complementary interests in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, arts, and humanities (broadly referred to as STEAM), and promote more robust interdisciplinary research, coursework, and public engagement in this space, both within and beyond Duke. The group will organize a half-day forum to catalog and describe innovative STEAM activities occurring at Duke and spark new collaborations among faculty, students, staff, and administrators.

  • Lead: Misha Angrist, Social Science Research Institute, Duke Initiative for Science & Society, Sanford School of Public Policy
  • Co-lead: Jory Weintraub, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Project manager: Ariana Eily, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Nicolette Cagle, Nicholas School of the Environment
  • Aria Chernik, Social Science Research Institute, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Claudia Gunsch, Pratt School of Engineering, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University Energy Initiative
  • Jules Odendahl-James, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Nimmi Ramanujam, Pratt School of Engineering, School of Medicine, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke Initiative for Science & Society, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Nina Sherwood, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Kearsley Stewart, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Victoria Szabo, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative

Health as an Ecosystem: Expanding Our Imaginations of Health

Health as an Ecosystem faculty members.

In ecology, an ecosystem is a community of living organisms and their interactions with the abiotic environment. Dynamic and complex, they may flourish in settings of balance, diversity, and responsive resilience, or they may flounder in contexts of deficit and disruption. This group will apply the ecosystem concept to health and explore new perspectives on health systems, population health, well-being, and disease. During monthly meetings, members will consider a range of questions and engage in activities whose focus will encompass capstone projects, seminars, and future grant proposals.

  • Lead: John Moses, School of Medicine, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Co-lead: Jennifer Lawson, School of Medicine, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Charles Nunn, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Richard Di Giulio, Nicholas School of the Environment, Pratt School of Engineering
  • Alice Ammerman, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill
  • Eliana Perrin, School of Medicine
  • Eric Richardson, Pratt School of Engineering
  • Jan Holton, Divinity School
  • Brett McCarty, Divinity School
  • Bill Walker, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Peter English, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Gopal Sreenivasan, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Norman Wirzba, Divinity School, Nicholas School of the Environment
  • Jon Fjeld, Fuqua School of Business, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Ray Barfield, School of Medicine, Divinity School, School of Nursing, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Warren Kinghorn, School of Medicine, Divinity School, Duke Initiative for Science & Society

Launching a Triangle-Wide Seminar in the Economics of Education

Launching a Triangle-Wide Seminar in the Economics of Education faculty members.

Currently, there is no regular forum for economists from the Triangle to discuss new empirical work on the economics of education. This group will change that by organizing a one-day workshop. Hosted by the Center for Child and Family Policy, the event will include invited presenters, discussants, and a keynote speaker. It will also serve as a means to explore the possibility of launching a year-long seminar series in 2019-2020 on the economics of education.

Marine Medicine: Multidisciplinary Research at the Nexus of the Environment and Human Health

Marine Medicine faculty members.

Marine medicine is focused on research that cuts across disciplines, including cross-species comparative analyses of cancer protective mechanisms, understanding the risk of disease from exposure to environmental toxins, and discovery of new drugs from marine compounds. This working group will convene monthly and invite guest speakers to provide critical feedback on papers and proposals. Members will also host an annual symposium with a keynote speaker and a networking event to establish collaborations between faculty across the School of Medicine and the Nicholas School of the Environment, and create a long-term strategy for sustained interactions.

Parasite-Host Evolution Network Optimization (PHENO) Working Group

Parasite-Host Evolution Network Optimization (PHENO) Working Group faculty members.

Better methods are needed to identify new pathogens or known animal pathogens with the potential to infect humans and cause disease. Given that pathogens transmit through chains of contact, network-based approaches that represent these epidemiological pathways offer great promise. Through regular meetings, this group of faculty and postdocs will investigate the application of network approaches to a wide range of disease systems and aim to develop new and fundable research projects.

  • Lead: James Moody, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Social Science Research Institute
  • Charles Nunn, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Craig Rawlings, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Gregory Gray, School of Medicine, Duke Global Health Institute
  • Chris Woods, School of Medicine, Duke Global Health Institute
  • Meira Epplein, School of Medicine
  • James Herrera, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Dana Pasquale, Duke Network Analysis Center

Social Studies of Science Working Group

Social Studies of Science Working Group faculty members.

The social study of science, often referred to as science and technology studies, is an interdisciplinary field whose scholars explore topics ranging from the ethical implications of data hacking and the politics of nuclear power to questions of personhood emerging from neuroscience. This group will bring together faculty who are interested in the rapid scale-up of research in the biomedical sciences, data and computational sciences, and environmental sciences as well as the increasing overlap of science and technology studies, medical humanities, and environmental humanities. Members aim to build a network of Duke and Triangle faculty and foster linked research endeavors.

  • Lead: Harris Solomon, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Nicole Barnes, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Global Health Institute
  • Nima Bassiri, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Paul Bendich, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Rhodes Information Initiative at Duke
  • Mark Olson, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Initiative for Science & Society, Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative
  • Cate Reilly, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Gabriel Rosenberg, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
  • Priscilla Wald, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Initiative for Science & Society
  • Ara Wilson, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke Initiative for Science & Society

For Rhodes Scholars, Duke’s Interdisciplinary Institutes and Initiatives Played Vital Role

Kadakia, Kantor, Wang.

On November 17, Duke University seniors Kushal Kadakia, Ariel Kantor, and Claire Wang were selected for prestigious 2019 Rhodes Scholarships. These three students and the 29 other recipients were chosen from among 880 applicants from colleges and universities across the United States.

Clearly, they are stellar young scholars and individuals. What else do they have in common? Throughout their undergraduate education, they have deeply engaged with the intellectual communities of Duke’s university-wide interdisciplinary institutes and initiatives.

Kushal Kadakia

Committed to pursuing research and policy to make healthcare more accessible, Kadakia is majoring in Public Policy and Biology, with a minor in Global Health administered by the Duke Global Health Institute.

Kadakia.A Truman Scholar and Faculty Scholar, he has served as chair of the Honor Council, vice president of Student Government, and a voting member of the Board of Trustees.

As a first-year student, Kadakia took part in the FOCUS Genetics and Genomics cluster and got involved with Duke’s Bass Connections program, in which faculty and students collaborate on interdisciplinary research into complex societal challenges. Kadakia’s first Bass Connections project team, Innovation & Technology Policy Lab, led to a follow-on grant. He won the Duke Libraries Holsti Prize for his related paper, “Rethinking R&D: Partnerships as Drivers for Global Health Innovation.”

As a member of the Bass Connections North Carolina Medicaid Reform Advisory Team, he provided recommendations to state legislators. “Collectively, Bass Connections has been the centerpiece of my Duke experience – providing a common thread to weave together my scientific training and my policy interests into an impact-oriented research experience that is now the foundation for my future career,” he said.

Taking this work further, Kadakia served as an intern on the policy team of North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper to work on Medicaid transformation, and he collaborated with Professor of Law Barak Richman and three other undergraduates to develop county-level case studies detailing the challenges in North Carolina healthcare. The group submitted its findings to the Department of Health and Human Services as the state seeks to improve rural access to healthcare and other Medicaid reform.

“I am still humbled, and a bit incredulous, at how much policy knowledge and intellectual authority Kushal exhibits – and how much respect he commands – before even completing his bachelor’s degree,” Richman said.

Kadakia was selected for the Huang Fellows Program at the Duke Initiative for Science & Society, in which students learn how to integrate ethics, policy, and social implications into their scientific research.

He served as a 2018 summer intern at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, working on projects studying the translation of international health innovations to the U.S. context. He has also been a research assistant for various Duke-Margolis projects, including Accountable Care Policy Gaps and Implications of Global Experiences with Accountable Care.

For his Public Policy honors thesis, Kadakia is exploring how an accountable care healthcare framework could repurpose international innovations to improve the U.S. healthcare system.

Rhodes Scholarships cover all expenses for two or three years of study at the University of Oxford. Kadakia will work toward the M.Phil. in Evidence-based Social Intervention and Policy as part of his preparation for a career in medicine and public service.

Ariel Kantor

Kantor created an interdisciplinary major through Program II around biotechnology, policy and bioengineering.

Kantor.He was a 2016 GCB Summer Scholar at the Duke Center for Genomic and Computational Biology (GCB). Mentored by Charles Gersbach, he pursued a research project to develop and characterize Cas9-fusion systems and examine their ability to control gene expression. He has continued working with Gersbach to develop new applications for CRISPR to facilitate epigenome editing.

Kantor has also worked with Susanne Haga, faculty member at GCB and the Duke Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine. His senior thesis examines developing technology-based therapies for orphan diseases. His work with Haga resulted in a publication analyzing the number and types of pharmacogenetic tests offered by clinical testing laboratories in the U.S.

Concerned about human rights and violence prevention, Kantor worked with the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute on programming to facilitate dialogue around religion, violence, and human rights.

He will pursue a doctorate in Molecular Biology at Oxford in preparation for a career in gene engineering and translational medicine.

Claire Wang

The recipient of Truman and Udall scholarships, Wang is majoring in Environmental Science and Policy and minoring in Economics and Asian & Middle Eastern Studies.

Wang.Active in the university’s vibrant culture of engaged scholarship in energy and the environment, Wang is currently taking a course on the transformation of the U.S. electric power sector, taught by Brian Murray, Director of the Duke University Energy InitiativeKate Konschnik, Director of the Climate and Energy Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy SolutionsJim Rogers, former CEO and chair of Duke Energy, and Norman Bay, former chair of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

“It would be an understatement to say that Claire is dedicated to environmental concerns,” said Timothy Johnson, associate professor at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment and faculty network member of the Energy Initiative. She “is approaching issues at the intersection of energy and the environment out of a larger concern for social well-being.”

Wang played a leadership role in the Duke Climate Coalition, one of the energy-related student organizations that comprise the Energy Initiative’s Student Advisory Committee. She has also been involved with student campaigns such as Duke Seize the Grid and Duke Renewable Energy Action.

At Oxford, Wang will pursue master’s degrees in Environmental Change and Management as well as Global Governance and Diplomacy, toward a career in environmental advocacy.

Read related articles on the Duke Today and Duke Chronicle websites.

Image at top: Kadakia at an event for legislators in Raleigh organized by the Bass Connections NC Medicaid Reform Advisory Team, courtesy of Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy; Kantor as a GCB summer intern, courtesy of Duke Center for Genomics and Computational Biology; Wang, courtesy of Nicholas School of the Environment. Photos below courtesy of Duke Today.

November 21, 2018

A World of Difference: Duke Global Health Institute 2017-18 Impact Report

Annual report

Global health is a broad field, encompassing many disciplines and perspectives. But I find one thing that unites this diverse community is an uncommon commitment to impact. We believe the true measure of our success is always the positive effect we have on the communities with whom we work.

For that reason, I’m pleased to share with you the Duke Global Health Institute’s 2017-18 Impact Report, which documents the demonstrable impact DGHI faculty, staff, students, and partners have made in the past year.

In this report, you’ll find stories about DGHI’s most powerful work, including:

  • How a team of DGHI faculty are helping improve the odds for pediatric cancer patients in Tanzania
  • How engineers and women’s health experts have come together to creating empowering new technology for women in low-resource settings
  • How DGHI students are working on the front lines to prevent infectious disease outbreaks in Southeast Asia
  • How a diverse team of faculty and students are coming together to address global health challenges in our own backyard.

These are just a few of the examples that make this report an inspiring read. I hope you share my enthusiasm for the work DGHI is doing around the world – and thank you to all of you who are helping to make these impacts possible through your support of the institute and its missions.

With regards,

Chris Plowe
Director, Duke Global Health Institute

Read the Duke Global Health Institute’s 2017-18 Impact Report.