Propose a New Research Collaboration on Infectious and Chronic Diseases

Deadline: December 19, 2022

Through this request for proposals, the Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) seeks to provide pilot funds to stimulate interdisciplinary research collaborations, with the goal of enabling investigators to leverage preliminary findings and data to obtain larger awards of external funding. Interested faculty are encouraged to collaborate with country-based collaborators on research projects incorporating infectious disease and chronic disease, including data collaboration.

View PDF for details.

Contact

Kelly Deal

Bring a Global Health Perspective to Your Doctoral Training

Two students trekking in the Amazon, with text over image: Doctoral Scholars.

Deadline: November 18, 2022

For current Duke doctoral students with a deep interest in global health, the Global Health Doctoral Scholars program offers the opportunity for dynamic intellectual exchange, faculty mentorship and rigorous dissertation research on a global health challenge. In collaboration with a faculty mentor, you will explore the social, economic and cultural context of global health while conducting innovative research impacting health equity and expanding your professional skills and opportunities.

As a Global Health Doctoral Scholar, you will receive 50% of your academic-year stipend for one year and may receive funding for a second year upon successful application for continuation. You will work closely with a Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) faculty mentor or a mentoring team. Our world-class faculty provide research guidance and professional development opportunities designed to advance your career in global health.

Program Highlights

In addition to faculty mentorship and dissertation research, year-round opportunities for engagement include participation in lunch seminars, leading professional development workshops and participating in panel discussions.

One-time grants of up to $10,000 are available for Scholars to undertake field-based dissertation research.

Apply

Applications for the 2023-2024 academic year are now open. The application deadline is Friday, November 18, 2022.

Students are encouraged to apply in their second year of PhD study or beyond. Funding begins in August of the following academic year and the appointment is for a minimum of nine months (September to May).

We’re here to help you understand your options, answer your questions and explore what’s right for you. Please contact us if you would like to meet.

View Eligibility and Application Instructions

Contact

Sarah Martin, Assistant Director for Graduate Admissions and Special Projects

Explore New Collaborations Through Global Health Travel Grants

Duke Global Health Travel Grants for Faculty.

Deadline: October 31, 2022

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. If you wish to travel soon, you can submit earlier.

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) is pleased to offer travel awards of up to $5,000 each to Duke faculty to pursue global health research opportunities in low, lower- and upper- middle-income countries  (a listing of eligible countries can be found at the World Bank website) or focused on health disparities in the American South. These awards are aimed at faculty looking to explore new collaborations by conducting a site visit.

Contact: Kelly Deal

View PDF

Chris Beyrer Named Director of the Duke Global Health Institute

Chris Beyrer.
Beyrer is a leading expert on infectious disease, public health and human rights.

Christopher C. Beyrer, MD, MPH, an internationally recognized epidemiologist who has worked on the front lines of HIV/AIDS and COVID-19 treatment and research, will be the next director of the Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI), university officials announced Friday.

Beyrer will join Duke on August 30 from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he is the inaugural Desmond M. Tutu Professor of Public Health and Human Rights as well as a professor of epidemiology, nursing and medicine.

He succeeds Dennis Clements, MD, professor emeritus of pediatrics and research professor of global health, who has served as interim director since 2020.

“Chris Beyrer will be an outstanding and passionate leader of the Duke Global Health Institute,” said Provost Sally Kornbluth. “He is a researcher, a scholar, a teacher and an advocate whose work has made a difference around the world. There has never been a more important time for global health, and under Chris’s direction DGHI and Duke will continue to be a leader in research, education and service to society.”

Beyrer has extensive experience leading international collaborative research and training programs related to infectious disease epidemiology and disease prevention. At Johns Hopkins, he directs the Training Program in HIV Epidemiology and Prevention Science, serves as associate director of the Center for AIDS Research and the Center for Global Health, and is the founding director of the Center for Public Health and Human Rights.

“During this time of profound change, the Duke Global Health Institute has continued to shine a light on health and social inequities here and around the world,” said A. Eugene Washington, MD, chancellor for health affairs at Duke University and president and CEO of the Duke University Health System. “In Chris, we have an exceptional leader, outstanding administrator and a remarkable scholar of human rights and inequities across various social gradients. His background, experiences and unmitigated passion for global health make him an ideal leader to help grow and magnify the excellence and impact of the DGHI,” he added.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has taught us all how truly interconnected we are as a global human family and how essential advances in biomedical research have been,” Beyrer said, “but also how challenged we’ve been to address fundamental questions of equity, access to health care and compassion for the underserved. It is an honor and a privilege to join the extraordinary team at the Duke Global Health Institute, which will continue to be part of the solution to these inequities. I’m confident that we can make real change happen where it matters most — in the lives of those we seek to serve.”

Exterior sign.
DGHI uses faculty from across the university to lead collaborative research and education on the most important global health issues of our time.

Beyrer, who has worked on COVID-19 vaccine trials since 2020, currently serves as senior scientific liaison to the COVID-19 Vaccine Prevention Network.  He is past president of the International AIDS Society, the world’s largest body of HIV professionals and has served as advisor to the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the HIV Vaccine Trials Network, the National Institutes of Health’s Office of AIDS Research, the U.S. Military HIV Research Program, the World Bank, the World Health Organization, and the Open Society Foundations, among numerous other organizations.

“Our mission in the School of Medicine is to advance patient care, research and education locally and globally,” said Mary E. Klotman, MD, Dean, Duke University School of Medicine. “As an internationally recognized scientist and leader in human rights and public health, Dr. Beyrer will be a visionary leader for our Global Health Institute, expanding on the work already underway and opening the door to new opportunities.”

Born in Switzerland to American parents, Beyrer grew up in New York and has pursued research, studies and interests in more than 30 countries.  The author of “War in the Blood: Sex, Politics and AIDS in Southeast Asia,” he has conducted collaborative research in Thailand for 30 years.

He attended Hobart and William Smith Colleges, where he majored in history and was elected Phi Beta Kappa. He received his medical degree from SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University and holds a Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Beyrer was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2014.

Beyrer’s appointment follows a global search led by Gillian Sanders Schmidler, professor of population health sciences and medicine and deputy director of the Duke Margolis Center for Health Policy, and a committee of Duke faculty and global health experts.

“I am very grateful to Dennis Clements for steering DGHI through the most significant public health crisis of the past century, and to the search committee for its persistence and dedication,” said Provost Kornbluth.

Beyrer is a widower. His late husband, Michael Smit, was a nurse practitioner in his native Baltimore.

Founded in 2006, the Duke Global Health Institute draws faculty from medicine and nursing, anthropology, psychology, public policy, engineering, environmental sciences and other fields to lead collaborative, interdisciplinary research and education on the most important global health issues of our time. DGHI hosts education programs for undergraduate, master’s degree, medical and doctoral students from a broad range of disciplines. In the most recent academic year, DGHI researchers led 270 research projects that received funding totaling over $75 million.

Originally posted on Duke Today

Pilot Your Research Project on Data Science in Global Health

Deadline: November 1, 2021

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) invites interdisciplinary teams led by Duke faculty to submit research proposals in the area of data science and global health. Research and collaboration around data, machine learning and innovation are important to DGHI, the Duke School of Medicine, and Duke University. Through this RFP, DGHI seeks to provide pilot funds to stimulate interdisciplinary research collaborations, with the goal of enabling investigators to leverage preliminary findings and data to obtain larger awards of external funding.

Eligible Applicants

Proposal teams require a Duke faculty PI and/or co-PI. Proposals that include collaborators throughout Duke and/or from other institutions are encouraged.

Budgets

The budget may include: supplies, support for technicians, research assistants, and graduate students; research-related travel; and other justifiable and allowable research expenses. Faculty salary, travel to scientific meetings, and indirect costs are not allowable expenses. Applicants may apply for up to $25,000 for a 12-month project. Smaller proposals for shorter periods are also encouraged.

Contact

Kelly Deal

Learn more and apply: see the full request for proposals.

Pilot Funds Available for Interdisciplinary Research on Global Environmental Health

Request for proposals.

Deadline: April 15, 2021

The Nicholas School of the Environment (NSOE) and the Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) invite pilot research proposals in the field of global environmental health. Through this RFP, NSOE and DGHI seek to provide pilot funds to stimulate interdisciplinary research in global environmental health, with the larger goal of enabling investigators to leverage preliminary findings and data to obtain larger awards of external funding.

We are especially interested in funding research around the effects of climate change on health outcomes. Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals are required. Investigators are particularly encouraged to submit proposals that plan to leverage existing studies, population cohorts, or data sets to address an important and novel global environmental health problem. Junior faculty and newly appointed faculty are encouraged to apply and will be given special consideration.

  • Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals are required. Teams including new investigators, investigators new to global environmental health, and/or investigators from low and middle-income countries, are encouraged.
  • NSOE and DGHI are looking for global health research ideas that will improve health equity and benefit hard-to-reach populations, low-resourced areas and partners.

Eligible Applicants

Duke regular rank faculty are eligible to apply for funding. Proposals that include collaborators from other institutions are encouraged. Study teams must include NSOE and DGHI participants and have a plan for leveraging this seed funding for additional external support.

Budgets

The budget may include: supplies, support for technicians, research assistants, and graduate students/postdoctoral affiliates; research-related travel; and other justifiable and allowable research expenses. Faculty salary, travel to scientific meetings, and indirect costs will not be paid by DGHI and should not be included in the budget submitted. Applicants may apply for up to $50,000 for a 12-month project. Smaller proposals for shorter periods are also encouraged. Given current spending and travel restrictions at Duke, expenses must be approved by your Department. If possible, please discuss your budget with appropriate Department personnel before submitting; we will be confirming approval before an award can be made.

Application Requirements

Proposals must be for activities in low, lower- and upper- middle-income countries (a listing of eligible countries can be found at the World Bank website: http://data.worldbank.org/about/country-and-lending- groups) OR focused on health disparities in the American South. (If you wish to propose a global health project that does not include LMIC or American South activities, please contact  Kelly Deal to discuss and receive approval.) Applicants are encouraged to identify collaborating in-country/local investigators, and should describe plans for how the results generated will be  applied to future external funding, as this will be an important criterion in the review.

Cover Page. Must include the following information:

  • Proposal title
  • Name, title, departmental affiliation, address, email address, and telephone number of all proposed investigators
  • Designation of a Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigators

Abstract (250 words maximum)

Research Plan (3 page maximum; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including the following sections:

  • Statement of research objectives
  • Significance of the research (including significance to NSOE/DGHI and/or Global Health and to research setting)
  • Proposed methods and plans for data analysis (specific details recommended)
  • Work already completed related to the proposed work (if relevant)
  • Description of the research team and research setting, including site collaboration plan
  • Plan for leveraging this seed funding for future external grant support
  • [a bibliography can be included as needed and does not count toward page limit]

Appendix Materials (1-page maximum each; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Research timeline and milestones
  • Letter of support from a collaborating researcher at research site

Budget and Justification (1-page maximum)

NIH Biosketch OR Curriculum Vitae

  • Include current grant support and limit to 5 pages for each investigator

Submission Format

Please combine all required elements into a single pdf document and submit via email to kelly.deal@duke.edu with the subject line of “NSOE/DGHI Pilot Grant Submission.”

Schedule

  • Application receipt date: April 15, 2021
  • Project start date: May 30, 2021

Inquiries

We welcome the opportunity to answer questions from potential applicants. Please submit inquires related to this funding announcement to: Kelly Matthews Deal, MPH Assistant Director, Research, Duke Global Health Institute: Kelly.deal@duke.edu

Pilot Grants from Duke Global Health Institute Support Innovative Pandemic Projects

Research will address key issues such as vaccine distribution, pathogen detection and the mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prof. Eroglu

Nine months after the novel coronavirus began to spread among human populations, the world still faces critical challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 40 DGHI faculty have pivoted to conduct research related to this global health crisis, in many cases launching projects outside of their existing research and with minimal or no external funding.

During summer 2020, DGHI awarded pilot grants to support several teams working to understand key questions related to the pandemic. Wendy Prudhomme-O’Meara and Kelly Deal, DGHI’s associate and assistant director of research, respectively, recently talked with researchers on each f these projects about their goals and progress.

Preparing for a COVID-19 Vaccine

DGHI’s pilot grants are supporting two important efforts led by the Center for Policy Impact in Global Health (CPIGH) to identify the most effective strategies to ensure that global allocation of a COVID-19 vaccine achieves maximum public health impact and equity.

In one project, CPIGH director Gavin Yamey, professor of the practice of policy and global health, and David McAdams, a professor in Duke’s Fuqua School of Business, are working with the World Health Organization and Gavi, the global vaccine alliance, to map out strategies for deploying an effective COVID-19 vaccine worldwide. Fundamental to their work is defining strategies that prevent high-income countries from monopolizing effective vaccines and instead ensuring that all countries have equal access.

At the same time, DGHI assistant professor Osondu Ogbuoji is leading efforts to help countries prepare for vaccine deployment by making key investments to strengthen their national health systems. Ogbuoji is leading a diverse, interdisciplinary team including physicians, health finance experts, engineers, policymakers, economists and infectious disease epidemiologists from several countries to identify concrete, actionable steps that can strengthen health systems to deal not only with COVID-19, but health challenges beyond the pandemic.

New Ways to Support Mental Health in a Pandemic

Many families are experiencing unprecedented stress and isolation during this pandemic, even as access to mental health and family services is restricted. DGHI’s global mental health research group has been working for years to develop alternative interventions that can provide support in places where formal mental health services are scarce – strategies that may prove effective to aid families during the pandemic.

Eve Puffer, an assistant professor of psychology, neuroscience and global health, and Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell, an associate professor of global health, are working to implement such interventions to help support caregivers in the Durham community. Their work centers on promoting a healthy, hopeful outlook even while confronting the stresses of the pandemic. They plan to share ideas and results with researchers worldwide.

DGHI also awarded a pilot grant to support an assessment of the economic and mental health burden of the COVID-19 pandemic in three low- and middle-income countries, led by professors Christine Gray, Kathryn Whetten and Nathan Thielman.

Early Detection of Novel Infectious Diseases

DGHI is supporting two projects seeking to create a global network to discover and detect novel pathogens like the coronavirus behind COVID-19 as soon as they begin to infect humans.

Led by DGHI professors and infectious disease experts Gregory Gray and Gayani Tillekeratne, this project involves testing samples from patients with pneumonia at hospitals in several countries, including Malaysia, Kenya and Sri Lanka. Samples will be evaluated on site, and through further testing at Duke labs, for the presence of several different viruses, including the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The goal of the study is to establish a network of hospitals for surveillance of emerging viral respiratory pathogens, which would serve as an early warning system to identify novel zoonotic pre-pandemic viruses.

Central to this program is building capacity for virus detection in partner laboratories in a sustainable way that provides actionable information for local clinicians and public health experts.

Originally posted on the Duke Global Health Institute website

Duke Global Health Institute Offers Funding for Pilot Research

Pilot research.

Deadline: April 20, 2020

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) invites interdisciplinary teams led by DGHI faculty to submit research proposals in the area of data science, machine learning, and/or artificial intelligence. “AI” is typically used to describe when computers are learning independent of human interaction (for example, the ability to perform tasks in complex environments without constant guidance by a user or the ability to improve performance by learning from experience). The field of AI includes or overlaps with machine learning, data science, and digital health. Per a 2018 report from USAID,

Examples of the use of AI in health can be found both in public health and medicine. Public health applications include populations risk management and intervention targeting or application of large datasets to surveillance and disease prediction. Patient-centered examples include improving image-based diagnosis with machine learning, chatbots to triage/refer patients or improve self-managed care, and virtual health assistants for front-line health workers.

Research and collaboration around data, machine learning and innovation are important to DGHI, Duke School of Medicine, and Duke University. Through this RFP, DGHI seeks to provide pilot funds to stimulate interdisciplinary research collaborations, with the goal of enabling investigators to leverage preliminary findings and data to obtain larger awards of external funding.

  • Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals are required. Teams including new investigators, investigators new to global health, and/or investigators from low and middle-income countries, are encouraged, and investigators from 2 or more Duke Schools, Institutes, Centers or Departments are required.
  • DGHI is looking for global health research ideas that will improve health equity and benefit hard-to-reach populations, low-resourced areas and partners.
  • We encourage cross-cutting investments that are applicable to more than one discipline or topic (e.g., something that would aid both malaria and cervical cancer elimination). Both the research areas and cross-cutting approaches are intended to be broadly defined—e.g., science may include anything from implementation science to genomics to sociobehavioral science.
  • Topic areas which have not previously received support and proposals that support and describe a sustainable line of global health research will be prioritized.

Eligible Applicants

Duke faculty are eligible to apply for funding. Proposals that include collaborators from other institutions are encouraged. Study teams should include investigators from more than one Duke School, Institute, or Department.

Budgets

The budget may include: supplies, support for technicians, research assistants, and graduate students; research-related travel; and other justifiable and allowable research expenses. Faculty salary, travel to scientific meetings, and indirect costs are not allowable expenses. Applicants may apply for up to $25,000 for a 12-month project. Smaller proposals for shorter periods are also encouraged.

Application Requirements

Proposals must be for activities in low, lower- and upper- middle-income countries (a listing of eligible countries can be found at the World Bank website: http://data.worldbank.org/about/country-and-lending-groups) OR focused on health disparities in the American South. Applicants are encouraged to identify collaborating in-country/local investigators, and should describe plans for how the results generated will be applied to future external funding, as this will be an important criterion in the review.

If you wish to propose a global health project that does not include LMIC or American South activities, please contact John Bartlett to discuss and receive approval.

Cover Page. Must include the following information:

  • Proposal title
  • Name, title, departmental affiliation, address, email address, and telephone number of all proposed investigators
  • Designation of a Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigators

Abstract (250 words maximum)

Research Plan (3 page maximum; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Statement of research objectives
  • Significance of the research (including significance to DGHI and/or Global Health and to research setting)
  • Proposed methods and plans for data analysis (specific details recommended)
  • Work already completed related to the proposed work (if relevant)
  • Description of the research team and research setting, including site collaboration plan
  • Potential for future external grant support

Appendix Materials (1 page maximum each; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Research timeline and milestones
  • Letter of support from a collaborating researcher at research site

Budget and Justification (1 page maximum)

NIH Biosketch OR Curriculum Vitae

  • Include current grant support and limit to 5 pages for each investigator

Submission Format

Please combine all required elements into a single pdf document and submit via email to kelly.deal@duke.edu with the subject line of “DGHI Pilot Grant Submission.”

Schedule

Application receipt date: April 20, 2020

Project start date: May 15, 2020

Inquiries

We welcome the opportunity to answer questions from potential applicants. Please submit inquires related to this funding announcement to:

Kelly Matthews Deal, MPH Assistant Director, Research Duke Global Health Institute; telephone (919) 681-7159, email: Kelly.deal@duke.edu