Pilot Grants from Duke Global Health Institute Support Innovative Pandemic Projects

Research will address key issues such as vaccine distribution, pathogen detection and the mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prof. Eroglu

Nine months after the novel coronavirus began to spread among human populations, the world still faces critical challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 40 DGHI faculty have pivoted to conduct research related to this global health crisis, in many cases launching projects outside of their existing research and with minimal or no external funding.

During summer 2020, DGHI awarded pilot grants to support several teams working to understand key questions related to the pandemic. Wendy Prudhomme-O’Meara and Kelly Deal, DGHI’s associate and assistant director of research, respectively, recently talked with researchers on each f these projects about their goals and progress.

Preparing for a COVID-19 Vaccine

DGHI’s pilot grants are supporting two important efforts led by the Center for Policy Impact in Global Health (CPIGH) to identify the most effective strategies to ensure that global allocation of a COVID-19 vaccine achieves maximum public health impact and equity.

In one project, CPIGH director Gavin Yamey, professor of the practice of policy and global health, and David McAdams, a professor in Duke’s Fuqua School of Business, are working with the World Health Organization and Gavi, the global vaccine alliance, to map out strategies for deploying an effective COVID-19 vaccine worldwide. Fundamental to their work is defining strategies that prevent high-income countries from monopolizing effective vaccines and instead ensuring that all countries have equal access.

At the same time, DGHI assistant professor Osondu Ogbuoji is leading efforts to help countries prepare for vaccine deployment by making key investments to strengthen their national health systems. Ogbuoji is leading a diverse, interdisciplinary team including physicians, health finance experts, engineers, policymakers, economists and infectious disease epidemiologists from several countries to identify concrete, actionable steps that can strengthen health systems to deal not only with COVID-19, but health challenges beyond the pandemic.

New Ways to Support Mental Health in a Pandemic

Many families are experiencing unprecedented stress and isolation during this pandemic, even as access to mental health and family services is restricted. DGHI’s global mental health research group has been working for years to develop alternative interventions that can provide support in places where formal mental health services are scarce – strategies that may prove effective to aid families during the pandemic.

Eve Puffer, an assistant professor of psychology, neuroscience and global health, and Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell, an associate professor of global health, are working to implement such interventions to help support caregivers in the Durham community. Their work centers on promoting a healthy, hopeful outlook even while confronting the stresses of the pandemic. They plan to share ideas and results with researchers worldwide.

DGHI also awarded a pilot grant to support an assessment of the economic and mental health burden of the COVID-19 pandemic in three low- and middle-income countries, led by professors Christine Gray, Kathryn Whetten and Nathan Thielman.

Early Detection of Novel Infectious Diseases

DGHI is supporting two projects seeking to create a global network to discover and detect novel pathogens like the coronavirus behind COVID-19 as soon as they begin to infect humans.

Led by DGHI professors and infectious disease experts Gregory Gray and Gayani Tillekeratne, this project involves testing samples from patients with pneumonia at hospitals in several countries, including Malaysia, Kenya and Sri Lanka. Samples will be evaluated on site, and through further testing at Duke labs, for the presence of several different viruses, including the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The goal of the study is to establish a network of hospitals for surveillance of emerging viral respiratory pathogens, which would serve as an early warning system to identify novel zoonotic pre-pandemic viruses.

Central to this program is building capacity for virus detection in partner laboratories in a sustainable way that provides actionable information for local clinicians and public health experts.

Originally posted on the Duke Global Health Institute website

Duke Global Health Institute Offers Funding for Pilot Research

Pilot research.

Deadline: April 20, 2020

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) invites interdisciplinary teams led by DGHI faculty to submit research proposals in the area of data science, machine learning, and/or artificial intelligence. “AI” is typically used to describe when computers are learning independent of human interaction (for example, the ability to perform tasks in complex environments without constant guidance by a user or the ability to improve performance by learning from experience). The field of AI includes or overlaps with machine learning, data science, and digital health. Per a 2018 report from USAID,

Examples of the use of AI in health can be found both in public health and medicine. Public health applications include populations risk management and intervention targeting or application of large datasets to surveillance and disease prediction. Patient-centered examples include improving image-based diagnosis with machine learning, chatbots to triage/refer patients or improve self-managed care, and virtual health assistants for front-line health workers.

Research and collaboration around data, machine learning and innovation are important to DGHI, Duke School of Medicine, and Duke University. Through this RFP, DGHI seeks to provide pilot funds to stimulate interdisciplinary research collaborations, with the goal of enabling investigators to leverage preliminary findings and data to obtain larger awards of external funding.

  • Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals are required. Teams including new investigators, investigators new to global health, and/or investigators from low and middle-income countries, are encouraged, and investigators from 2 or more Duke Schools, Institutes, Centers or Departments are required.
  • DGHI is looking for global health research ideas that will improve health equity and benefit hard-to-reach populations, low-resourced areas and partners.
  • We encourage cross-cutting investments that are applicable to more than one discipline or topic (e.g., something that would aid both malaria and cervical cancer elimination). Both the research areas and cross-cutting approaches are intended to be broadly defined—e.g., science may include anything from implementation science to genomics to sociobehavioral science.
  • Topic areas which have not previously received support and proposals that support and describe a sustainable line of global health research will be prioritized.

Eligible Applicants

Duke faculty are eligible to apply for funding. Proposals that include collaborators from other institutions are encouraged. Study teams should include investigators from more than one Duke School, Institute, or Department.

Budgets

The budget may include: supplies, support for technicians, research assistants, and graduate students; research-related travel; and other justifiable and allowable research expenses. Faculty salary, travel to scientific meetings, and indirect costs are not allowable expenses. Applicants may apply for up to $25,000 for a 12-month project. Smaller proposals for shorter periods are also encouraged.

Application Requirements

Proposals must be for activities in low, lower- and upper- middle-income countries (a listing of eligible countries can be found at the World Bank website: http://data.worldbank.org/about/country-and-lending-groups) OR focused on health disparities in the American South. Applicants are encouraged to identify collaborating in-country/local investigators, and should describe plans for how the results generated will be applied to future external funding, as this will be an important criterion in the review.

If you wish to propose a global health project that does not include LMIC or American South activities, please contact John Bartlett to discuss and receive approval.

Cover Page. Must include the following information:

  • Proposal title
  • Name, title, departmental affiliation, address, email address, and telephone number of all proposed investigators
  • Designation of a Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigators

Abstract (250 words maximum)

Research Plan (3 page maximum; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Statement of research objectives
  • Significance of the research (including significance to DGHI and/or Global Health and to research setting)
  • Proposed methods and plans for data analysis (specific details recommended)
  • Work already completed related to the proposed work (if relevant)
  • Description of the research team and research setting, including site collaboration plan
  • Potential for future external grant support

Appendix Materials (1 page maximum each; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Research timeline and milestones
  • Letter of support from a collaborating researcher at research site

Budget and Justification (1 page maximum)

NIH Biosketch OR Curriculum Vitae

  • Include current grant support and limit to 5 pages for each investigator

Submission Format

Please combine all required elements into a single pdf document and submit via email to kelly.deal@duke.edu with the subject line of “DGHI Pilot Grant Submission.”

Schedule

Application receipt date: April 20, 2020

Project start date: May 15, 2020

Inquiries

We welcome the opportunity to answer questions from potential applicants. Please submit inquires related to this funding announcement to:

Kelly Matthews Deal, MPH Assistant Director, Research Duke Global Health Institute; telephone (919) 681-7159, email: Kelly.deal@duke.edu

Undergraduates Can Get Involved in Global Health Summer Projects in the U.S. or Abroad

SRT.

Deadline: October 14, 2019

Applications are open for the Global Health Student Research Training Program, an intensive experiential learning program that engages second-year and third-year undergraduate students in the development, implementation and assessment of a community-based project. This year, students can choose from four projects in Honduras, India, Kenya and North Carolina. Applications are due October 14, 2019.

Working with a faculty director and a community partner, students will be at the center of global health challenges and have the opportunity to employ skills learned in the classroom in the community. Students will receive a grant to cover their fieldwork experience.

The Student Research Training Program is offered through the Duke Global Health Institute and is part of the Bass Connections in Global Health theme.

2020 Projects

Requirements

Students are expected to make a significant commitment to preparing for their experiential learning experience. This includes readings and background research, as well as taking part in:

  • Biweekly meetings with faculty directors
  • Predeparture workshops focused on project development and implementation
  • Re-entry retreat focused on processing the experience
  • Annual global health showcase.

How to Apply

  • Choose a project location that interests you.
  • Send a CV and a copy of your most recent transcript to gh-education@duke.edu (subject line: SRT Application).

International Travel Grants Available to Support New Collaborations in Global Health

Travel grants.

Deadline: October 28, 2019

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) is pleased to offer travel awards of up to $5000 each to Duke faculty to pursue global health research opportunities in low-, lower- middle, or upper- middle-income countries (please see World Bank list). These awards are aimed at faculty looking to explore new collaborations by conducting a site visit. [If you do not plan to visit an LMIC, please contact Kelly Deal before submitting your proposal.]

Applications will be reviewed on a biannual schedule, and should include a brief description of proposed activities (no more than 3 pages), budget, and applicant’s CV or NIH biosketch. Applications should emphasize the relationship of the proposal to DGHI’s Research Priorities, and/or Priority Partnership Locations, and the prospects for longer-term external research funding support. Budget cannot be used for conference travel, but can be provided for study team members if appropriate for the proposed activities.

Eligibility

Proposals must be submitted by Duke Faculty. Proposals from junior faculty and those who have never received a DGHI travel grant will be given priority in review.

Proposal due date: October 28, 2019

Funding award date: December 2, 2019

For questions, please contact Kelly Deal (Kelly.deal@duke.edu).

Applications are due by 5:00 p.m. on October 28, 2019. Please submit a single PDF electronically to Kelly Deal (Kelly.deal@duke.edu).

Learn more

Duke Global Health Institute Invites Faculty-in-Residence Proposals for 2020-2021

Faculty-in-Residence Program.

Deadline: September 30, 2019 (Letter of Intent)

Introduction

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) invites proposals for the Faculty-in-Residence Program for the 2020-2021 academic year. This program will support the career development of a faculty abroad, and further strengthen collaboration at a selected partner location.

Eligibility Criteria

Eligible candidates include a faculty member who holds a primary or secondary appointment at DGHI. Priority shall be given to an assistant professor (regardless of when the terminal degree was obtained), or an associate professor who has completed his or her terminal research degree or postgraduate medical training within the past 10 years (by submission of application).

A faculty member interested in applying should be prepared to commit a minimum of one academic semester, to one year. Preference will be given to those faculty who commit to staying up to a year.

Purpose and Objectives

In addition to advancing the faculty member’s research, the Faculty-in-Residence Program is intended to promote bilateral efforts, facilitate communication and partner collaboration, examine local challenges and capacity, and help expand research activities. This approach prioritizes active partnership and coordination. It is expected that 65% effort will be devoted to research activities, and 35% effort will be focused on promoting education and identifying strategic opportunities to advance collaboration.

Program objectives include:

  • Advance research and teaching opportunities by the faculty member
  • Work with DGHI and partners to deepen research and education collaboration
  • Mentor one or more MScGH students

Program Locations

Applications requesting to carry out the Faculty-in-Residence Program at the Priority Partnership Locations (PPLs) will be given priority. For more information on PPLs, please visit https://globalhealth.duke.edu/priority-partnership-locations. This will allow DGHI to continue to invest in sustainable and mutually beneficial partnerships with our host institutions. However, other locations in low- and middle-income countries will be considered on a case-by case basis. If you are interested in applying for this program, please speak with Sarah Cao (sarah.cao@duke.edu) prior to submission of the Letter of Intent to discuss interest and your proposed location.

Award Information and Terms and Conditions

  • Award period and duration: minimum of one fall or spring semester; maximum 12 months (total of time abroad). The earliest date the program may begin is July 2020.
  • Allowable budget items: partial salary and fringe benefits, visa, vaccinations, one round-trip economy airfare, housing stipend, and modest language training and project-related expenses. Salary support is negotiable, and DGHI leadership can discuss appointment terms in more detail with applicant’s Dean or Faculty Chair if requested. See the budget section below for more funding details.
  • Dependent airfare: DGHI will cover the cost of one round-trip economy class return trip per member of the household (spouse and legal dependents) if member(s) accompany the faculty member no less than 80% of the duration of the visit.
  • Education allowance for K-12 children: may be allowable depending on Duke employee eligibility. Faculty must meet the requirements, which includes long-term assignment of a minimum of one year.
  • A final progress report within three months after returning to Duke. This includes:
    1. Description of key partnering institutions and individual collaborators and the significance and potential for further collaborations fostered by the partnership
    2. Description of research and teaching activities and how these have strengthened DGHI partnership and contributed to the overall mission of DGHI
    3. Description of how the experience has shaped her/his future career plans

Required Application Information

Applicants should provide specific goals and outline proposed activities with partners, describing how these goals and activities will meet program objectives. Mentorship is required throughout the program to help identify the strategic objectives that would be the most beneficial for partnership-building. In addition, the application narrative should describe anticipated challenges and potential approaches to meeting those challenges, how the proposed activities will enhance the applicant’s career development, and plans for mentorship.

Key Dates

  • Letter of Intent due date: September 30, 2019
  • Application due date: November 8, 2019
  • Notification of award: November 22, 2019

Letter of Intent

No more than three pages to include the following information:

  • Summary of project statement, goals and objectives: include proposed length of time overseas (the dates must correspond with the RFP), and proposed location of research
  • Proposed outcomes and sustainability
  • General description of project funding needs during the stay

Submission Format: Please submit the Letter of Intent via email to sarah.cao@duke.edu with the subject line “Faculty in Residence Program Letter of Intent” no later than September 30, 2019.

Application Content

The review committee will contact you after a Letter of Intent has been submitted. If you are invited to continue with the application process, a full application will be due no later than November 8, 2019. Please include the following information and supporting documents and save as one PDF file.

  • Cover page including the following information (1 page):
    • Project title
    • Name, title, departmental affiliation, mailing address, e-mail address, and telephone number
  • Proposal (3 page maximum – single spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:
    • Detailed project statement, including plan for research activities, schedule, and anticipated milestones (not described in letter of intent). Include your existing relationship with your partner(s)
    • Identify your plan to strengthen collaboration, address specific challenges, and build capacity
  • Budget: Funding is intended to provide partial salary support and fringe benefits, economy travel, vaccinations, visa, housing stipend, language training, and project-related expenses. Dependent travel and education allowance may be allowable if eligible.
  • Summarize all estimated project expenses and provide an explanation for each line item proposed in the budget.
Allowable Expenses
Salary / fringe
Travel (round-trip economy airfare, vaccinations, visa)
Dependent travel, if eligible
Housing stipend
Project expenses and language training
Child education allowance – if eligible, per Duke policy
  • Unallowable costs include those deemed unallowable by Duke policy. For consultation on the budget, please contact Sarah Cao.
  • Applicants who receive alternative funding after submission of the application may resubmit the budget.
  • Updated CV.
  • Two letters of support:
    1. Faculty lead and/or mentor of the Partnership Location if you propose a PPL. The letter should include willingness from both the faculty champion and the partnering site to accept the faculty member, and a willingness from the mentor to help guide the faculty member during duration of the program.
    2. Department Head or Division Chief (if primary DGHI faculty, please request letter of support from Chris Plowe, Director, Duke Global Health Institute).
  • Submission Format: Please submit the application via email to cao@duke.edu with the subject line “Faculty in Residence Program Application” no later than November 8, 2019.

Program Contact

For questions regarding eligibility requirements, program guidelines, or application process, please contact Sarah Cao.

Duke Global Health Doctoral Scholar Receives Young Leader Award

Mercy Asiedu.

Mercy Asiedu, a fifth-year PhD candidate in biomedical engineering, received the CUGH/Wasserheit Young Leader Award at the 10th annual Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) Conference in Chicago earlier this month. Asiedu, a global health doctoral scholar at the Duke Global Health Institute, conducts research centered on using light to detect cancer in low-resource areas.

The CUGH/Wasserheit Young Leader Award is given to an individual under 30 years old who has demonstrated strong leadership abilities, established collaborations with colleagues in resource-poor settings, and shown outstanding achievement in addressing health disparities through education, research, advocacy and/or service.

Working under the mentorship of Nimmi Ramanujam, the Robert W. Carr Professor of Biomedical Engineering and a Duke Global Health Institute faculty member, Asiedu has pioneered the development of a speculum-free colposcope that transforms the conventional gynecological exam. Leveraging her background in mechanical engineering, she created the Callascope, an inexpensive device that connects with a smartphone to deliver images of the cervix comparable to a traditional $15,000 colposcope.

Asiedu has conducted volunteer and clinical studies to demonstrate the clinical impact of the Callascope, and she is developing machine learning algorithms for automated cervical cancer detection. She has also garnered funding to implement the Callascope in Ghana, her home country. In addition to her research and product development work, Asiedu is coleading an art campaign with her peers to use the Callascope to change the narrative on shame and invisibility in order to mobilize women to seek cervical cancer screening.

“I am very grateful to have received this award,” said Asiedu. “Biomedical engineering appealed to me because I recognized technology as a limiting factor for healthcare in places like Ghana, where I am from. My doctoral thesis on developing technologies for cervical cancer screening to address health inequalities combined with my global health certificate and fellowship have really given me the chance to start working towards addressing these issues.”

This award marks the second time Asiedu was recognized by CUGH for her leadership. At the 2018 conference, she received the Drs. Anvar and Pari Velji Emerging Leader in Global Health Innovation Student/Trainee Award.

“I’m delighted that Mercy won this award,” said Ramanujam. “She has the creativity, tenacity and leadership skills to transform women’s health.”

By Susan Gallagher; originally posted on the Duke Global Health Institute website

Duke Global Health Institute Offers Funding for Strategic Investment Colloquia

DGHI funding.

Deadline: April 15, 2019 (rolling review)

Opportunity

Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) faculty are invited to request funding to convene colloquia for the purpose of defining opportunities for new joint faculty recruitments or other new investments related to the research objectives in the 2019-2024 Strategic Plan.

Eligibility

DGHI faculty, from any discipline, are eligible to propose colloquia. Groups of at least 5 participating faculty are eligible to apply. DGHI faculty must be the Primary Convener(s) and colloquia must include faculty from at least two or more different Schools, Institutes, Centers and/or Departments, and, if justified, from other partner organizations.

Funding

Awards of up to $2,500 will be provided to support each successful proposal. Funds can be used to cover the cost of food, meeting venue, external speakers or other meeting costs.

Successful proposals will be submitted by groups of faculty who self-aggregate around a shared bold global health research idea that will make a significant impact on improving health equity in one or more of three broad research areas articulated in the Strategic Plan: Disease Elimination and Eradication, the Rising Burden of Non-Communicable Diseases, and/or the Environment and Health. Investments may also focus on cross-cutting approaches in Innovation, Policy, Science and/or Technology related to the three research areas. We encourage cross-cutting investments that are applicable to more than one discipline or topic (e.g. something that would aid both malaria and cervical cancer elimination). Both the research areas and cross-cutting approaches are intended to be broadly defined—e.g. Science may include anything from genomics to implementation science to sociobehavioral science.

Preference will be given to proposals that present a plan to convene colloquia that aim to define a recruitment strategy for a specific type of faculty candidate jointly with one or more Duke School, Institutes, Center and/or Department. Faculty recruitments (or other investments) that jointly advance the educational missions of DGHI and other Duke partners will also be given preference. Colloquia participants are encouraged to “think big” and not be constrained at the outset by anticipating a specific level of funding for proposed investments.

In addition to joint faculty recruitments, colloquia may develop proposals for other types of investments, including but not limited to infrastructure, major equipment, or staff hires.

Proposals

Proposals for colloquia will be accepted and reviewed on a rolling basis, with awards starting as early as March 15 through April 15. Colloquia should be held no later than May 15, and proposals for strategic investments should be submitted by June 1.

Proposals for colloquia should be submitted to Kelly Deal (Kelly.deal@duke.edu) as a single PDF and should include:

  • Brief (maximum two-page) narrative that articulates the area of shared intellectual interest and the question or problem the colloquium aims to address
  • Indication whether the proposal reflects a nascent or continuing collaboration; if continuing, a brief explanation of the activities to date
  • Proposed budget for the colloquium
  • Listing of the proposed colloquium participants and their affiliations
  • 5 page CV or NIH Biosketch for the DGHI faculty convener(s) of the colloquium

Review and Selection

Proposals will be evaluated on a rolling basis based on the potential to build collaborations in exciting intellectual areas for the Duke Global Health Institute that will have a meaningful impact on health equity and that add value to the larger Duke community.

The intent is that the collective set of award recipients will reflect the richness of intellectual approaches and modes of inquiry that make Duke such a vibrant university and will help DGHI move quickly to implement research objectives of the new Strategic Plan.

Expected Outputs of Funded Colloquia

Each funded colloquium will produce a detailed proposal for strategic investment that describes:

  • Details of the specific investment (e.g. joint faculty recruitment, infrastructure )
  • Research goal/question and anticipated impact on health equity in a community or population
  • Other expected results and benefits for DGHI, other Duke partners and community partners
  • How the investment fits with DGHI’s strategic plan and strategic plans and priorities of Duke University, Duke Health, and/or other Duke Schools, Institutes, Centers and/or Departments
  • Timeline
  • Estimated budget

These investment proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis and decisions on a first round of new investments will be made this summer. Calls for proposals for a second round of investments may be issued 1-2 years from now.

Interdisciplinary Teams of Faculty Can Apply for Global Health Pilot Research Grants

Global Health pilot research RFP.

Deadline: May 1, 2019

The Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI) invites interdisciplinary teams led by DGHI faculty to submit research proposals in an area of interest and/or priority for global health, that aim to achieve impact in strategic priority areas identified in the 2019-2024 Strategic Plan. Through this RFP, DGHI seeks to provide pilot funds to stimulate interdisciplinary research collaborations, with the larger goal of enabling investigators to leverage preliminary findings and data to obtain larger awards of external funding.

Collaborative and interdisciplinary proposals are required. Teams including new investigators, investigators new to global health, investigators from two or more Duke schools, institutes, centers, or departments, and/or investigators from low and middle-income countries, are encouraged.

DGHI is looking for global health research ideas that will make a significant impact on improving health equity in one or more of three broad research areas articulated in the Strategic Plan: Disease Elimination and Eradication, the Rising Burden of Non-Communicable Diseases, and/or the Environment and Health. Investments may also focus on cross-cutting approaches in Innovation, Policy, Science and/or Technology related to the three research areas. We encourage cross-cutting investments that are applicable to more than one discipline or topic (e.g. something that would aid both malaria and cervical cancer elimination). Both the research areas and cross-cutting approaches are intended to be broadly defined—e.g., Science may include anything from genomics to implementation science to sociobehavioral science. Proposals that support and describe a sustainable line of global health research will be prioritized.

Eligible Applicants

DGHI faculty are eligible to apply for funding. Proposals that include collaborators from other institutions or elsewhere at Duke are encouraged, but the PI must be DGHI faculty.

Budgets

The budget may include: supplies, support for technicians, research assistants, and graduate students; research-related travel; and other justifiable and allowable research expenses. Faculty salary, travel to scientific meetings, and indirect costs are not allowable expenses. Applicants may apply for up to

$25,000 for a 12-month project. Smaller proposals for shorter periods are also encouraged.

Application Requirements

Proposals must be for activities in low, lower-middle, and upper-middle-income countries (a listing of eligible countries can be found at the World Bank website; if you wish to propose a global health project that does not include LMIC activities, please contact John Bartlett to discuss and receive approval). Applicants are encouraged to identify collaborating in-country investigators, and should describe plans for how the results generated will be applied to future external funding, as this will be an important criterion in the review.

Cover Page. Must include the following information:

  • Proposal title
  • Name, title, departmental affiliation, address, email address, and telephone number of all proposed investigators
  • Designation of a Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigators

Abstract (250 words maximum)

Research Plan (3 page maximum; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Statement of research objectives
  • Significance of the research (including significance to DGHI and/or Global Health and to low and middle-income countries )
  • Proposed methods and plans for data analysis (specific details recommended)
  • Work already completed related to the proposed work (if relevant)
  • Description of the research team and research setting, including in-country collaboration plan
  • Potential for future external grant support

Appendix Materials (1 page maximum each; single-spaced, 12 point font, 1” margins) including:

  • Research timeline and milestones
  • Letter of support from a collaborating researcher in a low or middle-income country

Budget and Justification (1 page maximum)

NIH Biosketch OR Curriculum Vitae

  • Include current grant support and limit to 5 pages for each investigator

Submission Format

Please combine all required elements into a single pdf document and submit via email to kelly.deal@duke.edu with the subject line of “DGHI Pilot Grant Submission.”

Schedule

Application receipt date: May 1, 2019

Project start date: July 1, 2019

Inquiries

We welcome the opportunity to answer questions from potential applicants. Please submit inquires related to this funding announcement to:

Kelly Deal, MPH

Assistant Director, Research Duke Global Health Institute

Telephone (919) 681-7159, Email: kelly.deal@duke.edu