Register Now for Ph.D. Coaching and Mentoring Groups This Fall

Portraits of 15 people on background of Duke campus.
Three coaches and 12 peer mentoring fellows are available to lead small groups of doctoral students in the fall.

This fall, the Office for Interdisciplinary Studies is offering two sets of opportunities for Ph.D. students in all disciplines. Registration is now open, and students can register for fall groups by July 1.

Rising Second Year and Above Ph.D. Students

The Ph.D. Transitions Group Coaching Program helps students navigate the many changes and learning curves embedded in a five-to-seven-year doctoral program. Facilitated by a professional coach, each group provides a confidential space for Ph.D. students within the company of a small group of supportive peers. Coaching can accommodate a wide variety of topics. Popular ones from past participants include:

  • Developing more productive working relationships
  • Expanding networks of mentors and collaborators
  • Adjusting to a new stage or set of expectations in one’s program
  • Developing work (or life) strategy for a summer or semester
  • Productivity and time management
  • Cultivating work/life balance

Learn about the program, meet the coaches and register by Friday, July 1.

Incoming First-Year Ph.D. Students

The Ph.D. Peer Mentoring Program is designed to help new doctoral students flourish during their first semester on campus. Facilitated by trained peer mentoring fellows, these groups provide a nonjudgmental and confidential space for participants to discuss issues related to their Ph.D. training. No two groups will be alike. The topics, discussions and activities will be shaped by the interests and skills of the peer mentoring fellow and the participants. However, every group will provide:

  • Multiple, fresh perspectives on issues and questions that participants bring to the groups
  • Support and strategies for enhancing participants’ resilience and well-being in graduate school
  • Opportunities for participants to realize that they are not alone in the challenges they face as Ph.D. students
  • Ways for participants to widen their academic, professional and social networks across Duke and to mentor other Ph.D. students

Learn more and view peer mentors’ profiles and register by Friday, July 1.

Questions

Please email Dr. Maria Wisdom, director of interdisciplinary mentoring and coaching programs, at maria.wisdom@duke.edu.

Call for Proposals/Fellows: The Duke Ph.D. Student Peer Mentoring Fellows Program

Become a Duke Ph.D. student peer mentoring fellow.

Deadline: March 31, 2022

The Office of Interdisciplinary Studies is accepting proposals from Ph.D. students as part of the Duke Peer Mentoring Fellows Program. Student recipients will serve as peer mentors for first-year Ph.D. students in Fall 2022 and work together as a cohort to learn best practices and hone their skills in peer mentoring and small group facilitation.

An information session will be held on Wednesday, March 23, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. No registration is necessary. All may join using this Zoom link.

Background

In 2021, Trinity College for Arts & Sciences introduced a pilot program of 12 advanced Ph.D. students to serve as peer mentoring fellows and provide mentorship in small, interdisciplinary group settings for more than 65 early-stage Ph.D. students. Following that successful pilot, the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies will recruit another class of fellows who demonstrate leadership in building a strong culture of inclusive peer mentoring, well-being and resilience, to better support incoming first-year Ph.D. students.

Peer Mentoring

Traditionally, “mentoring” has assumed a 1:1 model, in which a more senior, experienced person guides and initiates a younger person into their discipline or profession. While this type of advising remains critical to Ph.D. student success (such as Ph.D. program faculty advisors), the Ph.D. Student Peer Mentoring Program seeks to introduce students to a broader, contemporary understanding of mentoring, which acknowledges the significant influence of both “horizontal” (peer) mentoring, as well as the potential for mentoring within small groups. For the purposes of this program, “peer mentoring” refers to the practices students take to support one another’s professional growth and personal development, regardless of career aspiration.

Details

We seek applications from Duke Ph.D. students (any discipline, program or school), currently in the second year of their program or beyond. Up to 12 fellowships will be awarded. Working closely with Dr. Maria Wisdom, director of interdisciplinary mentoring and coaching programs, peer mentoring fellows will:

  • Participate in peer mentor training (a dedicated section of “Best Practices in Mentoring” through the Duke Graduate Academy) in May 2022
  • Commit to leading their own interdisciplinary peer mentoring group (up to 8 Ph.D. students; at least 4 convenings) in Fall 2022
  • Continue to check in monthly with Maria Wisdom and the fellows cohort throughout Fall 2022
  • Write a brief final report of their activities in December 2022
  • Receive a stipend of $1,000 (provided to their department for the September 2022 payroll cycle)

Peer mentoring fellows will hone skills highly valued across multiple professional realms, such as active listening, group facilitation, basic coaching techniques and supporting a range of diverse learners and learning goals. Fellows will also cultivate a deeper awareness of their current roles as mentees, to support them in key advising relationships (such as with Ph.D. program advisors) and to help strengthen their ability to mentor others effectively in turn.

Eligibility

All active Duke Ph.D. students currently in the second year of their program or beyond are eligible for this program. All fellows must reside in one of the U.S. jurisdictions approved for Duke employment: North Carolina, District of Columbia, California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia.

Funding

Peer mentoring fellows will receive a stipend of $1,000, provided to their department for the September 2022 payroll cycle.

Proposal Requirements

The Office of Interdisciplinary Studies uses Formstack to receive applications. You will be asked to provide the following:

  1. A personal statement (maximum 2 pages), explaining your interest in the program and how it will contribute to your larger personal and/or professional goals. Please also discuss any previous significant experiences with advising, teaching, coaching or mentoring others.
  2. Contact information for two professional references who can speak for mentoring potential
  3. Current CV (maximum 2 pages)
  4. Completed online participation approval form signed by either your department director of graduate studies or your dissertation advisor

Review Process and Selection Criteria

The application process may include a phone or virtual interview. Applications will be reviewed by a faculty committee including Duke faculty, administrators and at least one former peer mentoring fellow.

Timeline

RFP released 3/9/2022
RFP deadline for submission 3/31/2022, 5:00 p.m.
Recipients notified 4/21/2022
Stipend provided 9/1/2022

Submission Instructions

Please submit proposal information by March 31, 2022, at 5:00 p.m. via this Formstack application form.

Contact for Questions

For questions about this funding opportunity, please contact Maria Wisdom, director of interdisciplinary mentoring and coaching programs, at maria.wisdom@duke.edu. For technical questions about the Formstack application, please contact Amy Feistel, interdisciplinary priorities coordinator, at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Register for Free Short Courses in the Summer 2022 Duke Graduate Academy

Register now for summer 2022 short courses in the Duke Graduate Academy.

The Provost’s Office is pleased to announce a new session of the Duke Graduate Academy, which offers online short courses that introduce Duke graduate and professional students and postdoctoral fellows to skills, tools and knowledge that augment their regular coursework and research.

These short courses help emerging scholars prepare for high-level research, innovative teaching, leadership and/or public engagement.

Courses in the Duke Graduate Academy cover topics not typically included in a graduate curriculum, or provide an intensive introduction for graduate students and postdocs who might not have the time or inclination to pursue a full course in a subject. Instructors are Duke faculty as well as highly trained Duke staff and Ph.D. students.

The Graduate Academy welcomes all current/active doctoral, master’s and professional students at any stage of their studies as well as all postdoctoral fellows. There are no prerequisites for any of the courses.

Program Details

Courses

2022 Graduate Academy Summer Session Course Descriptions

The Duke Graduate Academy Summer Session courses will be offered during Duke’s Summer Sessions I and II.

Each course meets regularly for one to two weeks. Participants may register for two (2) courses. Waitlists will be used for courses that are fully enrolled.

Courses are not for credit and are not graded, but will appear on Duke graduate student transcripts. None of the offerings require prerequisites or assume areas of knowledge. Classes are offered online with synchronous and asynchronous elements. Instructors will emphasize interactive discussion and group activities/projects to maintain a high level of student engagement.

Cost

There is no cost for Duke participants.

Location

All Duke Graduate Academy classes meet online/virtually. Individual class schedules are noted in the course descriptions and in DukeHub. Meeting details and coursework materials will be confirmed by instructor email or through course Sakai sites.

Registration

Duke Student Registration — Courses are open to all current/active doctoral, master’s and professional students. Duke participants may only register for two (2) courses. Waitlists will be used for all courses. All course changes must be completed by the Add/Drop deadline for the relevant Summer Session.

Duke Postdoc Registration — Participants may only register for one (1) course. Waitlists will be used for all courses. All course changes must be completed by the Add/Drop deadline for the relevant Summer Session.

For help with enrollment and withdrawals or for more information, contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Participation, Eligibility and Enrollment

Participation in the Duke Graduate Academy is open to current Duke graduate students, including Duke law and medical students, master’s and professional students. The Graduate Academy is also open to all Duke postdocs. Space is filled on a first-come, first-served basis during registration.

Most courses will enroll 30 students, although some courses may be smaller or larger. Courses with fewer than eight enrolled students may be canceled. Course participation will appear on Duke graduate students’ transcripts.

Contact and Additional Information

For questions regarding the Duke Graduate Academy, please contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Check out these reflections from past participants:

Summer 2022 Course List by Area

Courses are being offered in the following broad areas. Additional information and links are available in each area.

Technology

  • Innovation Co-Lab

Policy

  • Science Policy

Communication & Pedagogy

  • Best Practices in Mentoring
  • Science & Research Communication: Communicating Your Research to Nonexperts
  • Community-Engaged Research
  • Interdisciplinary Project Management
  • Online Teaching: Inclusive College Teaching
  • Planning and Publishing Digital Projects
  • Digital Humanities Research: Formulation to Publication
  • Digital Humanities: Working With Text
  • Public Speaking for Everyone
  • Teaching With Digital Archives

Business & Entrepreneurship

  • Leading Teams: Foundations of Teamwork & Leadership
  • Business & Organizational Fundamentals
  • Narrative Design Seminar

Interpretive Research Methods

  • Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
  • Evaluation: Understanding Impact & Improving Effectiveness
  • Introduction to Interviewing
  • Exploring Race and History in Durham, North Carolina and the South

Comments Sought in Regular Review of Director Ranjana Khanna

A university committee is seeking comments as part of a regular performance review of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute (the FHI) director, Ranjana Khanna. Regular reviews of institute directors are to be conducted in the penultimate year of their term by a committee formed by the provost in consultation with the Executive Committee of the Academic Council. Such a committee has been appointed to review Khanna, who was appointed for a first term as director in January 2018.

Members of the review committee are:

  • Harris Solomon, Fred W. Shaffer Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology (chair)
  • Jeffrey Baker, Professor of Pediatrics
  • James Chappel, Gilhuly Family Assoc Professor of History
  • Polly Ha, Associate Professor of the History of Christianity
  • Jennifer Nash, Jean Fox O’Barr Women’s Studies Distinguished Professor
  • Joseph Winters, Alexander F. Hehmeyer Associate Professor of Religious Studies and African and African American Studies

An important part of the review process is the solicitation and consideration of comments from the university’s many constituencies. Comments on performance and suggestions for the future are important to the committee’s work.

The charge to the committee poses several questions for the review, including Khanna’s effectiveness in the following areas:

  • Ability to provide intellectual and organizational leadership for an institute intended to engage, support and invigorate the humanities and interpretive social science communities at Duke
  • Ability to develop and foster successful interdisciplinary collaborations with leadership from departments, schools and other units across campus that have a humanistic or interpretive social science dimension, or that have the potential to benefit from engagement with such a dimension)
  • Effectiveness in engaging faculty from multiple schools and departments in the work of the FHI – we are interested in learning why some faculty do engage with FHI while others do not
  • Effectiveness in mentoring faculty leaders and pivotal senior and research staff who are responsible for directing key and emerging initiatives in the FHI
  • Demonstrated commitment to diversity, inclusion and excellence through leadership in hiring practices, faculty engagement, the forging of strategic priorities, and the mentoring of staff members
  • Administrative competencies regarding effective management of the FHI budget and staff
  • Effectiveness in engaging students—both undergraduate and graduate students—in FHI activities and programs
  • Overall effectiveness as the leader of a nimble, diverse organization

The committee invites you to share your thoughts by email or letter. Communication should include the nature of your interactions with Director Khanna so that the committee can understand the context of the comments as fully as possible. The committee will discuss responses, and a summary will be included in the written report to the provost.

The committee would appreciate receiving comments by April 14, 2022.

Ways to respond:

Information collected will be compiled in a report, without attribution, which will be submitted to the provost, the vice provost of interdisciplinary studies, and the dean of humanities at the conclusion of the review. Responses will be kept confidential. While a list of those from whom feedback is received will be part of the record, it will be in an appendix of the report which will not be shared. No comments or observations will be attributed to any individual in any report of the committee.

Support for External Organizations to Host Duke Ph.D. Student Summer Internships

View of Duke campus.

Deadline: February 4, 2022

Overview

During Summer 2022, the Duke University Provost’s Office in collaboration with the Office of Durham and Community Affairs will support professional development opportunities for current Duke Ph.D. students who do not have full summer funding. Organizations that would like to host such an opportunity may submit a proposal by February 4, 2022. Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/duke_phd_internships_external).

We are seeking Ph.D. student internships opportunities that provide Ph.D. students with research experience outside the university while remaining connected to their intellectual trajectory. To cite a few examples, in past years, Duke Ph.D. interns have engaged with:

  • The Modern Language Association to design and marketed a resource toolkit around curricular innovation and teacher training
  • Governance and Youth Economic Opportunities group at RTI International to deploy social network analysis (SNA) to facilitate international development projects, create user-friendly SNA guides and reports, and contribute to workshops and a community of practice event
  • The Consumer Protection Division of the North Carolina Attorney General’s Office to analyze regulatory developments in the European Union and report on findings to representatives from offices of Attorneys General in other states
RFP released 1/11/22
RFP deadline for submission 2/4/22 at 5:00 p.m.
Anticipated organization notification 2/11/22
Anticipated student application period 2/18 – 3/20/22
Anticipated priority application/selection period (rolling consideration thereafter) 3/21 – 3/25/22
Internship start/end 5/16 – 8/19/22

Restrictions and Parameters for Students

  • These opportunities will only be open to current Duke Ph.D. students without full summer funding. Students who will matriculate in the summer/fall of 2022 are not eligible.
  • Interested students will apply for posted opportunities through a central Duke portal, though the selection process and decision will rest with each internship host.
  • Internships can involve six weeks, eight weeks or twelve weeks of engagement, and must take place between May 16 – August 19 with no more than 19.9 hours/week, leaving time for students to engage with their own research, study and/or writing. Stipend amounts vary by the amount of time required.
  • The earliest date an internship may start is May 16, 2022; the latest an internship may end is August 19, 2022.
  • Duke Ph.D. students will receive a stipend commensurate with the three options for length of engagement paid across Duke’s June – August payroll cycles.
  • International Duke Ph.D. students who reside in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction detailed below and who wish to apply for a summer internship should consult as soon as possible with Duke Visa Services for assistance with filing applications for Curricular Practical Training and any other visa-related requirements.

Restrictions and Parameters for Host Organizations

  • Proposals from host organizations that can provide a 50% cost share on the stipend or receive Duke Office of Durham and Community Affairs stipend support (see below) will be given priority consideration. Where relevant, organizations will be invoiced in September 2022 for the stipend cost share.
Internship Duration

Stipend

Host 50% Cost Share

Three-month (19.9 hours/week)

$8,250

$4,125

Two-month (19.9 hours/week)

$5,500

$2,750

One and a half month/6-week (19.9 hours/week)

$4,125

$2,062.50

  • In an effort to support community partners unable to fund internships, regional nonprofit organizations may request support through the Duke Office of Durham and Community Affairs. To be eligible for stipend funding support, organizations must serve the regional community in one of Duke’s five strategic focus areas:
    • Community/nonprofit capacity
    • Housing affordability and infrastructure
    • Early childhood education and K-12 readiness
    • College and career readiness
    • Community health/food security and nutrition
  • Organizations requesting stipend assistance may inquire with Sandra Martinez Zuniga, sandra.martinezzuniga@duke.edu, senior program coordinator for civic engagement at the Office of Durham and Community Affairs.
  • Internship hosts must either be based in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction available for Duke employment: California, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

Selection Criteria and Review Process

Host organizations and supervisors must detail a program of work, with clear goals, deliverables, and identification of a supervisor, in their proposed job description. We encourage host organizations to plan for regular interaction with interns and to include them in team meetings. The review process will be overseen by the Duke vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Scope and Duration

In-person, remote and/or hybrid internships will be considered. The proposed internship experience should last for up to three months in the summer and proposals may be configured in one of the following formats:

  1. Three-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $8,250
  2. Two-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $5,500
  3. One and a half month/6-week internship (19.9 hours/week); intern will receive a stipend of $4,125

The proposed internship will take place between May 16 – August 19, 2022 and interns will receive a stipend paid across Duke’s June – August payroll cycles.

Proposal Requirements

Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/duke_phd_internships_external) through February 4, 2022 at 5 p.m.

You will be asked to provide the following information:

  • A title and brief description (one paragraph) for the proposed internship position
  • The number of interns your organization anticipates hosting
  • The start and end dates for the internship
  • The name and contact information for the organization/unit business manager
  • The name and contact information for the internship coordinator and the direct supervisor (if different)
  • A brief plan (maximum one page) that articulates the anticipated project or projects, describes the nature of engagement with organizational staff members, and specifies how the organization envisages a remote/virtual work experience (if relevant)
  • A confirmation of cost share, or explanation of why cost share is not possible

Contact

For questions related to the online application and/or other logistical questions, please contact Amy Feistel, amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Organizations based in the Triangle are encouraged to contact Sandra Martinez Zuniga, sandra.martinezzuniga@duke.edu, senior program coordinator for civic engagement at the Office of Durham and Community Affairs, especially if they wish to explore stipend coverage.

For questions related to internship work plans or cost sharing, please contact Edward J. Balleisen, eballeis@duke.edu, vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Register for Short Courses in the 2021 Duke Graduate Academy Summer Session

Duke Graduate Academy logo.

Deadline: May 14, 2021

Together Duke is pleased to announce a new session of the Duke Graduate Academy, which offers online short courses that introduce Duke graduate and professional students and postdoctoral fellows to skills, tools and knowledge that augment their regular coursework and research. These short courses help emerging scholars prepare for high-level research, innovative teaching, leadership and/or public engagement.

Courses in the Duke Graduate Academy cover topics not typically included in a graduate curriculum, or provide an intensive introduction for graduate students and postdocs who might not have the time or inclination to pursue a full course in a subject. Instructors are Duke faculty as well as highly trained Duke staff and Ph.D. students.

The Graduate Academy welcomes all doctoral, master’s and professional students at any stage of their studies and all postdoctoral fellows. There are no prerequisites for any of the courses.

Program Details

Courses

2021 Graduate Academy Summer Session Course Descriptions

Students taking selected courses may qualify for Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) credit. See course descriptions.

Dates

The Duke Graduate Academy Summer Session courses will be offered May 17 – 28 and June 7 – 18, 2021. Each course meets regularly for 1 – 2 weeks.

Courses are not for credit, but will appear on Duke graduate student transcripts. All courses are graded pass/fail. None of the offerings require prerequisites or assume areas of knowledge. Classes are offered online with synchronous and asynchronous elements. Instructors will emphasize interactive discussion and group activities/projects to maintain a high level of student engagement.

Cost

There is no cost for Duke participants.

Location

All Graduate Academy classes meet online/virtually. Individual class schedules are noted in the course descriptions and in DukeHub. Meeting details will be confirmed by instructor email or through course Sakai sites.

Registration

Duke Student Registration

Duke Postdoc Registration

Participants may only register for one (1) course. Waitlists will be used for all courses. Add/Drop for the Graduate Academy Summer Session ends May 14, 2021.

For help or for more information, contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Participation, Eligibility and Enrollment

Participation in the Duke Graduate Academy is open to Duke graduate students, including Duke law and medical students, master’s and professional students. The Graduate Academy is also open to all Duke postdocs. Space is filled on a first-come, first-served basis during registration.

Most courses will enroll 30 students, although some courses may be smaller or larger. Courses with fewer than 8 enrolled students may be canceled. Course participation will appear on Duke graduate students’ transcripts.

Contact and Additional Information

For questions regarding the Duke Graduate Academy please contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Learn More

Check out reflections from past participants: What I Got Out of the Duke Graduate Academy

Propose a Humanities Project for the 2021 Story+ Summer Research Program

Story+ request for proposals.

Deadline: December 4, 2020

The Story+ Summer Research Program is now accepting proposals for Summer 2021 projects that engage undergraduate and graduate students in collaborative research on humanities-based topics. Proposals are due by December 4 at 5:00 p.m.

Faculty are encouraged to link a Story+ project proposal to a 2021-2022 Bass Connections project team. Those wishing to do so must also complete the Bass Connections proposal process, also due December 4, 2020.

About Story+

Story+ is a six-week summer program that immerses interdisciplinary teams of students, faculty and staff in humanities research and public storytelling. Story+ promotes inquiry-based learning and vertically integrated collaboration through projects that may be driven by archival research, oral history, textual analysis, visual analysis, cultural criticism or other humanistic research methods.

Small teams of undergraduates, supervised by graduate student mentors, collaborate on focused projects that contribute to the broader research, teaching, scholarly communications, and/or public engagement agendas of Duke faculty, Duke librarians, nonprofit organizations and other University or non-University project sponsors. Story+ final projects have taken the form of writing, exhibits, websites, annotated archives, short films/videos, podcasts, social media content and other genres.

A typical Story+ team consists of a project sponsor, a graduate student mentor and three undergraduate researchers. Project sponsors benefit from the opportunity to engage a team of students, who are provided with appropriate guidance and mentoring through Story+, in producing a tangible product that may further their work. Story+ undergraduate students learn how to conduct rigorous interpretive research in a team setting, connect academic knowledge to broader social issues and communicate their research stories with diverse audiences – within and outside the University – in a complex media environment. Graduate mentors get the distinctive pedagogical and professional opportunity to manage a complex collaborative project and facilitate the network of relationships that such projects entail.

Call for Proposals Story+ 2021

The Franklin Humanities Institute invites proposals from Duke faculty, archivists and other campus and community members for the Summer 2021 edition of Story+. We seek projects of any topic that are anchored in humanities research methods and questions, with well-defined project goals that can be feasibly completed in six weeks. Outcomes of past Story+ teams have ranged from finished products (e.g., a completed curatorial plan a physical exhibit or a published research report), prototypes or pilot projects (e.g., a prototype online teaching module or a proof-of-concept audio podcast), as well as preliminary, exploratory research that contributes to a larger ongoing project (e.g., oral histories, translation, transcription or archival discovery).

We encourage proposals that build upon or towards course offerings, Humanities Labs, or Bass Connections teams during the regular school year. As possible points of reference, please see our Story+ website for descriptions and outcomes from previous teams. P.I.s or projects previously supported by Story+ are eligible to apply, but note that priority may be given, in these cases, to projects that demonstrate a significantly new direction or outcome.

Individuals are strongly encouraged to consult with Amanda Starling Gould about interest and available opportunities. Story+ is built upon the foundational values of care, inclusion, and community. Our primary objectives are to enable undergraduate and graduate students to participate in rigorous, hands-on humanities research, to facilitate collaborative and creative research transmission and to promote teamwork and interdisciplinarity as humanities modes of work.

Our values also animate how we reach out for partnerships across Duke and beyond Duke, in the projects we solicit and select, in the ways we recruit and support students, and in our common programming throughout the summer. We understand that our work is done with and within a privileged institution of higher education that has a historically complicated relationship with research subjects, objectification and positivism. To generate humanistic research means paying attention to how structures and systems influence the collection of evidence, methods of analysis and communication of results and to our particular identities and contexts as researchers.

This embrace of situated knowledge does not require that Story+ projects adhere to certain topics, modes of work; or presentation practices; it does however, require a self-awareness about the choices any particular project makes from subject matter, to methodology, to communication with the public, to divisions of labor and supervisory authority. As such, we ask all potential and participating partners to consider how you might (no matter your topics or goals) acknowledge, address, or understand intertwining systems of oppression (ableism, racism, sexism, heterosexism, etc.) as you create your projects and, more importantly, your projects’ plans of student work.

Project sponsors should plan to be accessible to their teams on at least a weekly basis and are expected to be regularly available to collaborate with their full team. The most successful and highly ranked of our projects are those with dedicated sponsors and clearly articulated goals.

Please Note: We anticipate Story+ 2021 will again be a remote experience. Feeling a little stuck on how to translate or transform your project to online-only? Amanda Starling Gould is available to help all teams envision and enact collaborative remote research practices and methods.

Please submit proposals via Qualtrics by December 4, 2020 at 5:00 p.m.

The Qualtrics application form will ask for the following components:

  • Brief description of the overall project
  • Description of the specific project goal(s) and output(s) you hope to accomplish through Story+. Please include here a basic timeline (approximately May 13 to June 25), project milestones, expected outcome(s) and how/why this work is important to your research/your unit/your organization.
  • Description of how your project aligns with the mission and goals of Story+ to offer a rich humanities research and public storytelling experience for graduates and undergraduates
  • Workplan: this is optional but ideal. This might include a sketch of methods, methodologies, weekly schedule, opportunities for students, campus/community partners who might collaborate, post-Story+ afterlives of the research.
  • List of essential skills undergraduates will need to contribute to the project
  • Do you have a graduate student in mind for the role of your graduate mentor? If you would like us to help match you with a mentor, please list essential skills you would like this person to have.
  • Any funding from external sources or other Duke units that can support the work of the team

For queries about the program and/or to discuss specific project ideas, please email Amanda Starling Gould. Story+ is funded by Together Duke and administered by the Franklin Humanities Institute in conjunction with Bass Connections, with additional support from the Duke Libraries.

Duke Graduate Summer Academy Offers Second Session of Free Online Short Courses

Graduate Summer Academy.

Update: The 2020 Duke Graduate Summer Academy will offer a second session of online short courses. Registration is open from June 8 to June 17 at noon. Please feel free to contact Amy Feistel (amy.feistel@duke.edu) with questions.

Please see the 2020 Graduate Summer Academy Course Descriptions and registration page.

About the Duke Graduate Summer Academy

Together Duke is pleased to announce the Duke Graduate Summer Academy, which offers online short courses that introduce Duke graduate students (both doctoral and masters) and postdoctoral fellows to skills, tools, and knowledge that augment their regular coursework/research. These short courses help emerging scholars prepare for high-level research, innovative teaching, leadership, and/or public engagement.

Courses in the Duke Graduate Summer Academy cover topics not typically included in a graduate curriculum, or that provide an intensive introduction for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who might not have the time or inclination to pursue a full course in a subject. Instructors are Duke faculty members as well as highly trained Duke staff members.

The Graduate Summer Academy welcomes all doctoral and masters students at any stage of their studies and all postdoctoral fellows. There are no prerequisites for any of the courses.

Courses

The Duke Graduate Summer Academy Session II courses will be offered June 22 through July 10, 2020.

Each course meets for up to three hours per day for 1 – 2 weeks. Space permitting, participants may register for one (1) course. Waitlists will be used and students will be notified if they are moved from a waitlist to active course enrollment.

Courses are not for credit, but will appear on Duke graduate student transcripts. None of the offerings require prerequisites or assume areas of knowledge. Courses are offered online with synchronous and asynchronous elements. Instructors will emphasize interactive discussion and group activities/projects to maintain a high level of student engagement.

Cost

There will be no cost for Duke participants.

Location

All Graduate Summer Academy classes meet online/virtually. Individual class schedules are noted in the course descriptions. Meeting details will be confirmed by email or through the Graduate Summer Academy Sakai site.

Registration

Registration is open June 8 to June 17 at noon.

Please see the registration page. For help or for more information, contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Participation, Eligibility, and Enrollment

Participation in the Duke Graduate Summer Academy is open to Duke doctoral students, including Duke law and medical students, postdocs, and master’s students with space filled on a first-come, first-served basis during the registration window detailed above.

Course participation will appear on Duke graduate students’ transcripts. Most classes will enroll 30 students, although some classes may be smaller or larger. Classes with fewer than 8 enrolled students will be canceled.

Contact and Additional Information

For questions regarding the Duke Graduate Summer Academy, please contact Amy Feistel at amy.feistel@duke.edu. Visit strategicplan.duke.edu/graduate-summer-academy for answers to frequently asked questions. We offer the following reflections from past participants: