The Clean Energy Prize Returns! Duke Students, Send Us Your Ideas

Clean Energy Prize.

Deadline: May 28, 2021

The Duke University Energy Initiative (EI) and Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative (I&E) announce the return of the Clean Energy Prize to support the development of energy technologies, products and services at Duke.

The Prize makes a $10,000 award to support novel ideas, potential products and services that advance an accessible, reliable, affordable and clean energy future. The Prize is separate and distinct from other Duke funding.

Proposals may be submitted by undergraduate, graduate and professional students at Duke, including May 2021 graduates. Proposals are encouraged for innovative projects that could lead to new products or services that will advance a clean energy future, including but not limited to:

  • Demonstrating the feasibility of an idea or innovation for a commercial or social venture
  • Developing a working software, service, or device prototype
  • Developing new applications or markets for a technology under development.

DEADLINE FOR 2021 SUBMISSIONS: Friday, May 28, 2021, 11:59 p.m. EDT.

Learn more and download the application instructions.

Questions? Contact Suellen Aldina (suellen.aldina@duke.edu), Director of Engagement and Administration, Duke University Energy Initiative.

Grow Your Research Idea with Incubator or Germinator Seed Funding

Research Incubator and Germinator Awards.

Deadline: June 11, 2021 (letters of intent); August 20, 2021 (full application)

The Duke Institute for Brain Sciences (DIBS) supports two seed-grant funding programs. These high-risk/high-return funding mechanisms provide funding for research that is exploratory and therefore not yet ready for external funding.

Research Incubator Awards

Incubator Awards, up to $100,000, are for teams of faculty representing at least two departments or areas of research. See more information.

Research Germinator Awards

Germinator Awards, up to $25,000, are for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, residents or faculty. See more information.

Important Dates for Both Award Mechanisms

  • Letters of intent: Due by 5:00 p.m., Friday, June 11, 2021
  • Full application: Due by 5:00 p.m., Friday, August 20, 2021
  • Award notifications: Anticipated in November 2021
  • Funding start: January 1, 2022

Learn More and Apply

See the DIBS website for full information.

Delve into Archival Expeditions in Summer 2021

Archival Expeditions.

Deadline: April 30, 2021 (priority)

Archival Expeditions introduces Duke graduate students to teaching with digital primary sources. The student partners with a Duke faculty or librarian sponsor to design an undergraduate course assignment or module that incorporates primary source material in a specific class taught by their sponsor. Sponsors are not required; if a student does not have a sponsor one will be assigned based on subject area. Students have the option of drawing on the Rubenstein Library’s Digital Collections or primary source databases available at Duke.

Graduate students will be expected to spend 10 hours per week over 8 weeks consulting with their sponsor, library staff and other experts and researching, developing and testing the module. The students will work with their sponsor to establish the expectations and parameters for the module after being accepted to the program. A module can take a variety of shapes and be adjusted to fit different courses, disciplines, and goals of the sponsor. Each module should be designed to allow for roughly 1 week of time within an existing course or 10 student hours. These hours can be a combination of in-class and out-of-class activities.

Successful applicants will join a cohort of other Archival Expeditions graduate student instructors. They will participate in Teaching with Digital Archives, May 17-28 through the Duke Graduate Academy (see related article) In addition, they will participate in a brief orientation at the beginning of the program and will meet a few times during the summer to share experiences and lessons learned.

Students will be compensated $1,500 for their work. The course module will also be made available on the Archival Expeditions website under a CC-BY NC Creative Commons license, allowing other faculty and students to learn from and reuse it.

Eligibility

Any Duke graduate student who has completed 1 academic year at Duke may apply. Applications will be reviewed by a panel of faculty members and librarians. Please review the Frequently Asked Questions for Faculty and Librarian Sponsors to be clear about expectations. Applicants are encouraged to review their project proposal with a librarian before submission.

Frequently Asked Questions for Faculty and Librarian Sponsor

What is the faculty or librarian sponsor’s role?

The sponsor will establish the expectations and parameters for the module with the graduate student and act as a consultant during the design and testing of the module.

What is the time commitment?

The sponsor and student should plan to meet at least once a month, more frequent meetings can be determined by the faculty sponsor and the graduate student.

What is a module?

A module can take a variety of shapes and be adjusted to fit different courses, disciplines, and goals of the faculty sponsor. Each module should be designed to allow for roughly 1 week of time within an existing course or 10 student hours.

If my student needs support finding material or building the module who should they contact?

The primary liaison for the student is the faculty or librarian sponsor, who can communicate their vision for the module.

Apply Now

Priority deadline is April 30, 2021; additional applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis.

Download Application

Please send your completed application and faculty or librarian sponsor recommendation (if applicable) to:

Katie Henningsen
Head of Research Services
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

Re-Imagining Medicine Offers Undergraduate Fellowships for Summer 2021

ReMed logo.

Deadline: April 9, 2021

The Re-Imagining Medicine Fellowship (ReMed), sponsored by the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities & History of Medicine, Trinity College, and the Kenan Institute for Ethics, will offer 15 pre-health Duke students a virtual, interactive summer program exploring the intersection of medicine, virtue and moral purpose.

ReMed seeks to foster the character, imagination and practices needed to work effectively in contexts of human suffering and healing. Leaders across disciplines — history, ethics, spirituality and expressive writing, as well as doctors and other healthcare professionals help students explore themes often absent in traditional medical education.

Fellows will meet weekly on Thursday evenings in June and July. Each Fellow will be paired with a medical mentor for additional engagement throughout the summer.

Fellows will receive a stipend of $1000.

Why Re-Imagine?

Virtually all graduates of US medical schools take some form of the Hippocratic Oath, one of the oldest covenants in history and an expression of ideal conduct for the physician. The ancients could not have imagined the complex moral landscape of medical practice today, from protecting patient privacy to responding to a global pandemic to addressing inequities based on race, class, and location.

In this Fellowship program, you are invited to imagine the ways that doctors and other healthcare professionals can use their specialized knowledge and skills with humility to care for individuals, cure and prevent disease and suffering, flourish in their chosen profession, and work toward the greater good.

This Fellowship is a program of The Purpose Project at Duke. The Purpose Project, sponsored by The Duke Endowment, makes matters of character, questions of purpose, and explorations of one’s life’s work signature features of the Duke experience.

The Program

ReMed will begin in mid-May with a virtual welcome event for introductions and orientation. In June-July, we will meet in the evening once a week for discussions and problem-solving activities focused on questions such as:

  • How do we move from what we can do to what we should do?
  • What does it mean in practice to “do no harm”? And how do we affirmatively “do good”?
  • What historical and sociological understandings must inform our work to ensure that healthcare is just, fair humane and equitable?
  • How can we prepare to practice medicine with character, to develop a sense of meaning and purpose, and to contribute to society?
  • What skills are needed to be a “good” doctor, and where can we learn, develop and see them in practice?

As we consider these questions in the context of professional life and current events, we will focus on the broader implications of the work of healthcare professionals for society as a whole and how they contribute to a just and equitable society and human flourishing more generally. We will work to cultivate student creativity, compassion and humility. We will practice ethical reasoning in context. We will also explore civic virtues—justice, inclusion and service—and the moral and intellectual virtues that promote contributions to the public good: autonomy, judgment, honesty and empathy.

The Fellowship will also connect students with mentors in the health professions. When we return to campus in the fall, ReMed will conclude with a Summer in Review conversation and a final (hopefully in-person) event to celebrate completion of the program. Enthusiastic participation in all aspects of the program, May-October, is required.

Apply Now

To apply, please complete and submit the application, including your résumé and contact information for a faculty member who will serve as a reference, by April 9, 2021. Fellows will be selected and all applicants notified no later than April 21. The program will begin in mid-May with Orientation and end in October with a closing event. Participants do not need to reside in Durham during the summer.

Summer 2021: External and Internal Opportunities for Duke Ph.D. Students

PhD student opportunities.

Deadline: Rolling through April 21, 2021

The Duke University Office of the Provost is offering a broad set of opportunities to support Ph.D. students during Summer 2021. In the tables below you will find a list of experiential fellowships with external partner organizations; and a list of internship opportunities with Duke units.

Keep in mind that enrolled Ph.D. students can also propose a summer internship that they arrange themselves through the Graduate Student Training Enhancement Grants (GSTEG) program. (Update: The GSTEG deadline was March 22.)

Provost Experiential Fellowships

A limited number of experiential fellowships with external organizations are available by application. The partner organizations will offer three-month summer internship experiences for Ph.D. students. Interested students should search the opportunities to match both skills/background and research interests.

Host organizations will consider applications on a rolling basis through April 21. Ph.D. students may apply to only two (2) positions (this could be two experiential fellowships, or one fellowship and one of the Duke internships in the section below); please apply separately for each.

Questions for all external experiential fellowships should be directed to Maria Wisdom, Director of Graduate Student Advising and Engagement.

See the FAQ for the Summer 2021 Provost experiential fellowships for Duke Ph.D. students.

How to Apply

All applications must be submitted through a Duke portal: Apply for an experiential fellowship

You will be asked to submit the following:

  • a letter of application
  • a brief CV (2 page maximum)
  • a letter of support from the department DGS, indicating how the proposed virtual/remote internship will enhance your intellectual trajectory

Browse, search or sort alphabetically by any column. Click on the link in the Fellowship Focus column to access more information.

OrganizationFellowship FocusBrief Scope of Work
American Historical AssociationFILLED: Data Collection, Teaching Resources and Other ProjectsWork on projects such as collecting data on history PhDs and making teaching resources available for instructors. Update Where Historians Work website, assist in cleaning and creating data web-scraping sources, analyze survey results, vet and update Remote Teaching Resources
Durham Technical CC Creative & Liberal ArtsFILLED: Curriculum Diversification for British Lit I & IIDiversify curriculum for important gen ed courses (British Lit) to be inclusive of groups that are left out of the Western canon. Will connect with faculty and resources involved in similar projects, research work from underrepresented communities in British Lit, create course content to be accessed by future instructors.
Durham Technical CC Creative & Liberal ArtsEquity Gaps in Student Success RatesSupport selection and adaptation of an intervention to address equity gaps in student success rates. Will review the literature to find promising interventions, work with community college instructors to adapt the intervention so it can be piloted in a first-year composition class.
Durham Technical CC Creative & Liberal ArtsFILLED: Health HumanitiesInfuse health humanities content and pedagogical best practices into cluster of community college core courses; review literature and work with Durham Tech team
Modern Language AssociationFILLED: MLA ProgramsHelp organize, market and run a two-week professional development seminar, Why Humanities Now; help design, develop and market a toolkit of resources; help organize materials for Summer Teaching Institutes
Museum of Durham HistoryOral Histories from Durham Community MembersExpand online oral history program; conduct interviews with community members, archive story submissions, create materials for marketing oral history program
National Humanities AllianceFILLED: Campus Outreach and EngagementLead outreach efforts to minority-serving and access-oriented institutions for Humanities for All and Study the Humanities initiatives; conduct research and outreach concerning humanities recruitment efforts and publicly engaged teaching and scholarship at minority-serving and access-oriented institutions
National Humanities CenterPandemic Experiences of Healthcare and University SystemsAssist with development of curricular materials, student mentoring, metadata management, interview transcription, research into funding opportunities, creation of promotional and publicity materials, administrative outreach
NC Department of JusticeFILLED: Consumer Protection Division3 possible projects: Explore ways to improve disclosures consumers receive from companies and make consumer choices more informed; explore ways to use technological tools to obtain information that would help identify matters where consumers are being harmed and may need protection; determine optimal options for allocating money obtained in a multistate settlement
Society of Biblical LiteratureFILLED: Bible OdysseyConduct user research for BibleOdyssey.org; design and conduct focus groups and surveys to understand behavior and interests among discrete categories of users
RTI InternationalAlternative Energy OptionsShape new book series, including developing topics and content for three or more volumes, identifying state of the art research, and networking with related experts
RTI InternationalBehavioral and Physiological Markers of HealthCollect, extract and analyze data to support an ongoing systematic review; contribute to manuscripts synthesizing data extracted from the review efforts
RTI InternationalClimate Change Economic ImpactsQuantify economic impact of climate change; estimate increased incidence of inland flooding and its economic impact on infrastructure; develop data and modeling resources that can provide improved estimates of increased environmental damage to infrastructure in the US with climate change; develop spatially explicit economic characterizations of buildings and infrastructure
RTI InternationalClimate Solutions ImpactExamine role of natural climate solutions in 2020 and 2021 NDC submissions; identify magnitude of anticipated emission reductions from these activities; review and synthesize LULUCF components of country's NDC submissions, generate estimates of magnitude of emissions reductions from mitigation actions, collaborate with a project team to conduct economic analyses of mitigation commitments, assist with report writing and manuscript development
RTI InternationalFILLED: East Africa Energy Program ImpactDesign and conduct a most significant change study of the influence the program has had on the enabling environment around grid-based energy sector in Kenya
RTI InternationalEconomic Impact ModelingDevelop framework to estimate the economic impacts, at a sectoral level, from interventions in the on- and off-grid sectors; assist in development of a survey instrument, data curation and compilation, drafting literature review, visualization and summarization of modeling outputs, inputs to a draft manuscript
RTI InternationalEnergy ModelingDevelop computer programs to manage and visualize data and simulate electricity system behavior; contribute to original research article(s)
RTI InternationalFossil Fuel and Electricity CharacterizationCharacterize fossil fuel and electricity use in residential and commercial buildings and/or industrial processes; identify electrification technology options; develop data and modeling resources to characterize temporal and spatial distribution of economy-wide costs, environmental benefits and electricity system investments required to support large-scale electrification
RTI InternationalFILLED: Governance and Youth Economic OpportunitiesConduct social network analysis research on international development projects
RTI InternationalInnovation AdvisorsConduct tasks related to market research and commercialization of new technologies
RTI InternationalSubstance Use, Gender, and Applied Research ProgramAssist across national and international projects in South Africa that seek to reduce substance use, HIV, risk behaviors, gender violence and stigma; promote treatment effectiveness and compliance; and enhance family and community support in addressing substance use and related gender issues in underserved populations in community-based settings

Provost Internships at Duke

This is a list of Duke internship and research assistant opportunities offered by units across campus. Ph.D. students should search for opportunities that match both their skills/background and research interests. You may apply to only two (2) positions (this could be two internships, or one internship and one of the experiential fellowships in the section above); please apply separately for each. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis through April 21.

See the FAQ for the Summer 2021 Provost internships for Duke Ph.D. students.

How to Apply

All applications must be submitted through a Duke portal: Apply for an internship

You will be asked to provide the following:

  • a letter of application
  • a brief CV (2 page maximum)
  • a letter of support from the department DGS, indicating how the proposed virtual/remote internship will enhance your intellectual trajectory

Browse, search or sort alphabetically by any column. Click on the link in the Internship Focus column to access with more information.

Duke UnitInternship FocusBrief Scope of Work
Center for Cognitive NeuroscienceImpact Neuroscience Program PilotParticipate in pilot program focused on supporting career development of grad students in neuroscience and improving the broader culture of science. Will submit poster/recorded talk at the end of the summer based on the methods training engaged in over the summer, produce commentary on and recommendations for the the initiative.
Duke Clinical and Translational Science InstituteCommunity Engagement Research InitiativeDevelop and implement plan to assess quality of community engagement with partners
Duke Clinical and Translational Science InstituteFILLED: Democratizing Health and Social/Environmental DataContribute to 2 projects focusing on democratizing health and social/environmental data: assist with phenotyping health conditions and curating social and environmental health data; explore health literacy and information accessibility; learn about social and environmental influences on health
Duke ForestFILLED: Field Evaluation of Road Underpasses for Wildlife Habitat ConnectivityDevelop rapid assessment protocol for wildlife passage in consultation with local experts and with consideration of existing protocols; implement rapid assessment protocol at priority locations; evaluate viability of passage within the network and recommendations for improving passage at each location
Duke ForestFILLED: Socioeconomic Analysis of Landscape Habitat ConnectivityConduct spatial and quantitative analysis of socioeconomic data as it relates to Eno-New Hope landscape; conduct spatial and qualitative analysis of most pressing local-government political drivers across region; investigate where landscape habitat connectivity may have related benefits for ecosystem services, public health, and climate resilience
Duke Global Health InstituteTextbook PreparationAssist Eric Green to prepare materials for his open access textbook on global health research methods
Duke University LibrariesFILLED: Exhibition on Latinx History at DukeSynthesize research conducted by students in Spring 2021 Latinx Social Movements course; conduct original archival research to supplement exhibition; work on exhibition services (copyright and bibliographic research, editing exhibit copy, assisting with graphic and exhibit design, utilizing digital humanities tools to expand online presence)
Duke University PressData Security Toolkit CreationCreate branded, easy-to-engage template for clients; collect existing security documentation and information from internal and external sources; synthesize data security documentation to be provided to prospective organizations as part of their services contracting process
Duke University PressFILLED: Journal Platform CreationCreate scholarly journal content sites, including site review and QA, and digital content loading (XML) to the sites. Will learn business data flows and tools involved in creating full journal content sites
Franklin Humanities InstituteFILLED: Digital PublicsActivate humanities content from the FHI’s extensive video and essay collections for growing online audiences of cultural, social and historical analysis
Global Health and Cultural AnthropologyFILLED: Health Humanities Workshop and CurriculumBuild health humanities content and pedagogical "best practices" seminars. Lead and execute all aspects of research and course development; create six modules on a different aspect of health humanities
Graduate Liberal Studies ProgramFILLED: Benchmarking Research ProjectAssist in completing a benchmarking research project to facilitate transformative educational experiences in graduate-level liberal arts study. Main duties include data cleaning, follow-up, contextual research, analysis
Graduate Program in LiteratureFILLED: Summer Graduate InternEnhance and develop resources to help grad students understand programmatic requirements and procedures, and discover opportunities for research and professional development; update Student Handbook, Sakai website with guides; develop guide to research
Marine LabFILLED: C-CoAST Community EngagementWork with C-CoAST network on engagement activities designed to integrate researcher, practitioner and stakeholder expertise across the spectrum of coastal interests, culminating in coproduction of a research agenda that supports coastal communities
Marine LabFILLED: Community Science Initiative (CSI)Support CSI’s civic engagement work and engage with the local coastal communities of NC; projects include STEM Pathways; Training for Resiliency and Race-Equity; K-12 curriculum program evaluation, modification and teacher support; citizen science data collection and analyses
Marine LabFILLED: Fisheries Consortium of Eastern NCHelp create Fisheries Consortium of Eastern NC to facilitate intersciplinary collaboration; produce consortium website; form interest/focus groups, host meetings and surveys; develop framework for consortium meetings
Nasher Museum of ArtVirtual Exhibition DevelopmentAssist with creating virtual exhibitions. Experience with HTML/CSS/JavaScript is essential. May participate in videography, graphicdesign, marketing, exhibition design and visual resource management
NC Leadership Forum, Provost’s Office and Sanford School of Public PolicyAcademic Research Agenda DevelopmentReview and synthesize academic literature related to underlying theories that ground NCLF program; develop scoping paper that discusses potential lines of research for future projects; participate in planning and execution of ongoing NCLF programs; possibly assist with next steps for NCLF core program
Office of Undergraduate EducationAcademic Resource CenterAssist and lead the design, implementation and evaluation of ARC research and assessment activities to determine efficacy of services and programs
Office of Undergraduate EducationFILLED: Duke LIFEResearch best/peer practices for summer bridge programs for incoming 1GLIs
Office of Undergraduate EducationOUE ResearchSupport data management, documentation and analysis; literature search and review; report and manuscript preparation; and future research planning
Office of Undergraduate EducationOUE and Student Affairs Campus Climate CommitteeSupport literature-review subcommittee and interview (focus group, survey, and in-person interview) subcommittee of the CCC
Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript LibraryFILLED: Digital Archival ExpeditionsWork on development of active learning sessions and assignments for Duke undergrad courses with group of fellows. Will hold office hours to support development of each project, serve as a peer mentor for fellows, organize trial teaching for fellows to test their modules, coordinate project development workshops for fellows, review and provide regular feedback to fellows on work
SociologyFILLED: Refugee Integration Curriculum DevelopmentDevelop 5 projects for Health and Immigration class (Fall 2021), involving analyzing, grounding and application of World Relief Durham data/methods
Social Science Research InstituteFILLED: Informing Social Change and Anti-Racism Initiatives through Applied Research and EvaluationProvide critical engagement in SSRI's university- and community-partnered efforts; contribute to a community-engaged evaluation research study in partnership with a social-change youth orchestral program that works with Triangle-area Title 1 schools, interview-based data collection and analysis; develop evaluation design for emerging Duke anti-racism initiatives
Social Science Research InstituteTheory, Concept, and Development of Programming to Dismantle Racial HierarchiesFacilitate design, development, piloting and refinement of intervention/program activities and materials; identify optimal delivery modes for highest impact, from perspective of historical and scientific accuracy as well as effectiveness of delivery
Triangle Center for Evolutionary MedicineFILLED: Evolution-based K-12 Lesson Plan DevelopmentDevelop evolution-based K-12 lesson plans for Darwin Day Roadshow. Responsibilities include conceptualizing lessons, aligning lesson plans with NC Standards, developing comprehensive teacher resources for lesson plans (presentations, worksheets, suggestions for further student exploration). Will develop at least one lesson plan and modify/update existing lesson plans

Design a Collaborative Project for a Duke Undergraduate Course

Collaborative Project Expeditions.

Deadline: April 16, 2021 (priority)

The Bass Connections program offers Collaborative Project Expeditions, which provides support for doctoral students to work with a faculty sponsor to create or redesign an undergraduate course at Duke that integrates collaborative, project-based work as a central element of the course design. Participating students will receive a stipend of $1,500 and will be expected to spend approximately 75 hours over the course of the summer or a semester developing the collaborative project in consultation with their faculty sponsor. We expect to fund two to four doctoral students.

While we will consider applications on a rolling basis, the priority deadline for applicants proposing a Summer 2021 expedition is Friday, April 16 at 5:00 p.m.

What Are Collaborative Projects?

Collaborative projects are learning experiences that require students to work in teams on a research question using the academic knowledge and skills concurrently being developed in the course. Collaborative projects strengthen students’ ability to apply classroom learning to interdisciplinary or disciplinary challenges and work effectively on teams, and should culminate in the creation of new knowledge, tangible works and/or creative or artistic products.

Collaborative projects can take a variety of shapes and may be adjusted to fit different courses, disciplines, levels and goals. Examples of collaborative projects deployed in other courses include having teams of students:

  • Examine a collection of archival materials to develop an interactive library exhibit and research guides to “open” the archive to new scholarship
  • Develop, test and iterate an open-source application to address an identified problem
  • Work with nonprofit clients to design program evaluation plans that meet each client’s needs
  • Partner with an NGO to develop a white paper on a current or emerging policy issue

For an example of how faculty and doctoral students might leverage the Collaborative Project Expeditions program, read reflections from Professor of Sociology Jen’nan Read and Ph.D. student Colin Birkhead, who redesigned SOC 250: Immigration and Health to integrate client-based collaborative projects.

How Does the Expedition Work?

Participating doctoral students will be expected to work 75 hours over the course of the term to develop their collaborative project. Depending on the objectives of the faculty sponsor and participating student, this time may include:

  • Consultations between the student and faculty sponsor
  • Development or modification of a course syllabus and project modules
  • Design of course materials and resources for student teams
  • Development of assessment rubrics
  • Outreach to project partners and relationship cultivation

Specific tasks that doctoral students might think through as part of the expedition (with the caveat that no one student could do all of these tasks) would include how to:

  • Plan and scope collaborative projects
  • Structure class time
  • Design project plans, milestones and deliverables
  • Identify and cultivate relationships with internal and external project partners (if applicable)
  • Create and manage student teams
  • Manage collaborative student projects in remote learning environments
  • Design and/or connect students to relevant project resources
  • Assess student work (including teamwork)

In cases where a doctoral student is helping a faculty member redesign a course that already includes a collaborative project component, a narrower focus on a particular planning area may be more appropriate. For example, a student could focus her work on identification and outreach to external partners and relationship building, or resource creation for project scaffolding, or another element of project design entirely. Expectations for how a student spends his/her time will be dependent on what is most needed.

Students will participate in a brief virtual boot camp at the beginning of the program (depending on the number of students selected) and will have the option to “meet” as a cohort to brainstorm ideas and share experiences and lessons learned. Students will also be expected to write a short reflection on their experience for publication or for use in a professional portfolio or relevant job market materials related to pedagogy, teaching, teamwork/collaboration and/or project management.

Benefits for Doctoral Students

Through this opportunity, doctoral students will have the chance to practice course design, collaboration, project scoping and management, team building and leadership.

Ideally, this experience will enable doctoral students to:

  • Work collaboratively with faculty (and possibly staff and external partners) on course design, project management and team building
  • Think critically about course pedagogy and when to integrate collaborative projects into courses
  • Develop concrete learning objectives and clear course syllabi
  • Plan and scope applied research projects, especially with short timelines
  • Facilitate teamwork (e.g., build effective teams, develop and scaffold key resources, troubleshoot interpersonal/team issues)
  • Broaden their intellectual networks and build strategic external partnerships
  • Teach and mentor undergrads

Application and Selection

To apply, please email Meghan O’Neil (mmo12@duke.edu) a proposal including a:

  1. Description of the course that you will be helping to design/update, including an overarching vision for the collaborative project, how the project will be integrated into the course and how this project will enhance student learning in the course
  2. Plan detailing when you plan to complete this program (e.g., Summer 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022) and the specific tasks that you will undertake to develop this idea over 75 hours
  3. Statement of support from the faculty sponsor that includes a clear articulation of the faculty member’s commitment to the course design plan and the objectives of the proposed expedition
  4. Brief description of your other sources of funding during the period in which you plan to complete this program. Please include opportunities that are confirmed or in process, as well as those for which you plan to apply. (Please confirm that any awarded fellowships during the same period allow supplemental work and compensation.)

Applications will be reviewed by Bass Connections. The strongest applications will be those which include: a strong commitment from the faculty sponsor, clear rationale for how a collaborative project is integral to the course’s learning objectives, well-articulated expectations for what the student will achieve in their 75 hours of work, and evidence of a strong working plan between the student and her faculty sponsor.

Eligibility and Funding Restrictions

Participating students are responsible for adhering to financial policies and restrictions (including restrictions on hours of work per week) set by grantors of any other fellowships or positions held during the funding period. Please note that some fellowships do not allow supplemental funding. Please see the Graduate School Supplementation Policy for more information. We also advise that students consult with their advisor and Director of Graduate Studies about how this opportunity would fit in their academic and funding plans for the proposed period of work.

Contact

Meghan O’Neil, Bass Connections (mmo12@duke.edu)

Find and Fund Your Summer Energy Internship

Zoom call.
“In 11 weeks, I got to source and connect with amazing teams of entrepreneurs solving the most pressing challenges in the energy world. These were PhDs, reinvented athletes, single mothers, emeritus professors, all driven by their unique stories to tackle climate change.” – Elena Cavallero, T’21 on her summer 2020 remote internship with Prime Impact Fund

Deadline: Rolling

The Energy Internship Program connects Duke students from all majors, backgrounds and degree programs to summer internship opportunities across the energy sector, including at start-ups, utilities, renewable energy developers, large firms, government agencies and nongovernmental organizations.

FIND YOUR INTERNSHIPView summer 2021 internship opportunities for Duke undergraduate and graduate students (NetID log-in required). Welll be adding new internships throughout the spring, so check back here regularly and keep an eye on our weekly newsletter.

FUND YOUR INTERNSHIP— Duke undergraduate and graduate students (excluding those who will be graduating in May 2021) may apply for supplementary funding through the Energy Internship Program once they have been offered an energy-related internship. This funding can be used to turn an unpaid internship into a paid internship or increase the stipend for a low-paying internship.

The internship does not have to be included on the Energy Initiative’s list of opportunities for you to be eligible for funding.

The amount of financial support will be negotiated with both student and employer, based on numerous factors, including the extent of compensation (if any) indicated in the internship offer letter. Funding decisions are made on a rolling basis, so apply ASAP after receiving your internship offer!

Thanks to a partnership with the Energy Access Project at Duke, some funding is reserved for internships related to energy access or energy transitions in low- and middle-income countries.

Note: Internships funded by the Energy Internship Program in summer 2021 may need to be conducted remotely if Duke University’s evolving pandemic policies require it.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES— Explore other Duke-affiliated programs on our summer experiences page. And of course, the career center affiliated with your Duke school has information about other potential opportunities and is an excellent source of advice on interviewing and other career development skills.

QUESTIONS? Contact Stacy Peterson (Assistant Director for Student and Alumni Engagement, Duke University Energy Initiative).

Learn more.

Work on Your Venture Through the Duke I&E Summer Accelerator

Deadline: March 24, 2021

The Duke I&E Summer Accelerator (virtual in 2021) provides select teams with access to additional resources in order to further their ventures. Students in the Accelerator receive mentorship, classes, community-building activities, and a $5,000 stipend. Additionally, Duke I&E staff will provide ongoing support, tailored resources, and relevant connections to Duke and external community members.

Each Accelerator cohort will include teams and solo entrepreneurs. The cohorts will be kept small, with fewer than 20 students accepted.

Each student receives a $5,000 stipend, with a maximum of two stipends per team.

The Accelerator will be virtual in Summer 2021; no coworking space will be provided to participants. Students will learn of acceptance to the program by April 1, 2021 and will be expected to sign a contract committing to the program requirements.

Timeline for Summer 2021

March 1 – Applications open
March 24 – Applications due
April 1 – Offers made
April 15 – Contracts due
June 1 – Schedule provided
June 7 – August 6 – Programming
August 5 – Pitch Day

Eligibility

  • Undergraduate, graduate, and professional students are encouraged to apply.
  • Students who will graduate in Spring 2021 are still eligible to apply.
  • While preference is given to students working in teams on their ventures, individuals are also eligible.
  • Participation in the Student Founder Program or any other program or course is not required to apply.
  • Admissions are vertical agnostic; all types of ventures are welcome. Applicants should have a prototype and should have done significant customer research.

Expectations

Participation. If you are selected for the program, working on your project will be your full-time job. You’ll complete assigned readings, watch videos, give presentations to mentors, receive feedback, and participate in discussions with field experts.

Attendance. A member of each team will attend every event, with attendance recorded by I&E staff. Required programming will take place during the business day (9am-5pm ET) and will not exceed 10 hours per week, including a weekly check-in with the whole cohort.

Passion. With the ups and downs intrinsic to entrepreneurship, and with progress being unpredictable, enthusiasm for your work is one of the most important factors for your success.

Coachability. You’ll receive a lot of feedback—some of which you’ll love and some of which you won’t. We ask that you take all feedback respectfully and thoughtfully.

Transparency. We’ll expect you to share business plans, presentation pitches, financial projections, and additional information with mentors, staff, and other cohort teams.

Contact

Please direct questions to Amy Linnane: amy.linnane@duke.edu; 919-360-9214.

Learn more and apply.