Duke Students Design Solutions to Help Communities Flourish

Graphic: Drawing of people collaborating, using open design principles.

By Katherine Zheng ’23

When we tackle complex challenges — such as making education more equitable despite limited resources, or making healthcare more accessible to differently abled people — how can we effectively include human stakeholders in the research and development processes?

A Bass Connections team has been exploring equity-centered approaches to specific challenges in education, health, entrepreneurship and innovation. Student team members presented their work to date at a recent event held by Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship (I&E), Duke Pediatrics, Bass Connections and the Divinity School.

Open Design Process

The team utilized open design, which involves four phases: understand, create, evaluate and share. Team leader Aria Chernik explained it as an “equity-centered innovation methodology that is derived from design thinking, putting equity at the center in how we create it and who is with us creating it.” Chernik is associate professor of the practice in the Social Science Research Institute.

The projects all had different areas of focus, but all led with the goal of determining “how communities flourish and how people have an equitable opportunity to flourish,” said team leader Kevin Hoch, I&E managing director for education.

Each group asked a “what if” question, designed three creative possible solutions, and presented stakeholders with concept posters and a prototype.

Projects and Ideas

Pediatric Health

This group focused on healthcare accessibility for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) such as autism and Down syndrome. “Physicians and pediatricians need more of a shared understanding with those with IDD,” said junior Hannah Zelinger, adding that other guiding principles included a more positive environment and empowerment of youth with IDD to gain as much independence as possible.

Graphic: What are the needs, desires and hopes of the community?

Public policy master’s student Cameron Love joined Zelinger to give a presentation on the group’s main idea: a community open house where youth with IDD can be directed to community services or medical help as needed. This would ensure a more direct way for youth to receive help beyond the complex healthcare system, which can deter patients from receiving proper help today.

Necessity-Driven Entrepreneurship

Sophomores Jun Woo Kang and Wendy Shi presented their group’s work with a nonprofit called Helius to research necessity-driven entrepreneurship. Helius provides training and coaching for small businesses and necessity-driven entrepreneurs. The group focused on strengthening the overall Helius community and increasing connections to funders.

Graphic: Portal to Success, Helius Passport, Scale-Up Event.

The group’s idea, Portal to Success, is a website that would be a connection portal to allow current cohort members to get in touch with past members. In addition, consolidated lessons from Helius would be available on the site.

Community-Based Innovation

Presented by junior Kara Wall, this group researched the question, “How might we create a program that fosters relationships and reflects community needs while promoting equitable and holistic education?” They worked with the Oak Grove AME Zion Church, Campbell University and Harnett County Schools to investigate equitable education opportunities.

Graphic: Means for greater community transformation.

Solution ideas included an immersive two-week summer literacy program that fostered personal development, a month-long equitable after-school pilot, and a summer-long program fostering students’ well-being through a holistic and equitable literacy and STEM curriculum. The group decided to focus on the summer-long option, which prioritizes life skills and personal development.

Education

This group explored how to use computer science (CS) education to improve human flourishing. Teachers need an easy-to-implement CS curriculum, educators need to ensure equity in the curriculum, and students need a way to connect with the subject material, explained presenters Ritvik Janamsetty, a sophomore, and Krista Pipho, a Ph.D. student in genetics and genomics.

Screenshot of TeachTech website prototype.

Their solution was standards mapping, which is a way for educators to fulfill CS standards at the same time as standards for English language arts. A prototype website called TeachTechNC maps the standards and allows school administrators to check off which standards the CS curriculum meets.

Time for Implementation

Each interdisciplinary team educated the audience on how we can effectively use the open design method to take on tricky issues with community partners. “It’s clear that the Human Flourishing Project’s participants are motivated and energized by the challenge of working on real-world problems,” said Pipho, who is also a member of the Bass Connections Student Advisory Council. “I’m excited to see the proposed solutions enter the implementation phase this semester.”

Throughout the spring, the team members will be building out prototypes, testing them and iterating with community co-designers.

How to Get Involved

Through February 11, Duke students of all levels can apply for the 2022-2023 Bass Connections team, Open Design Studio: Participatory Solutions for Human Flourishing. Virtual info sessions will be held on January 21 and 25.

Katherine Zheng is a junior at Duke University studying economics and public policy. She works as a student assistant in the Office of Interdisciplinary Studies.

11 Ways to Dive Into Collaborative Humanities Research Through Story+

Story+ projects.

Deadline: February 20, 2022

Eager to explore interdisciplinary humanities research? Student applications are now open for this summer’s Story+ research program. The application deadline is February 20, but applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis, so students should apply as soon as possible.

Story+ is a six-week summer research experience for undergraduate and graduate students who work in small teams to bring academic research to life through dynamic storytelling. In 2022, the program will be offered in a hybrid format from May 11 through June 24. Nine teams will be fully in-person and two fully remote. Graduate and undergraduate students will receive a stipend for their participation. Please see details and application information.

Explore the 2022 Story+ Projects

Story+ is administered by the Franklin Humanities Institute in conjunction with Bass Connections, with support from Duke University Libraries.

Learn More

Democracy and Governance in a Polarized World: Call for Proposals

Text: Democracy and Governance in a Polarized World.

Deadline: March 31, 2022

Bass Connections is now accepting proposals for new year-long projects addressing issues related to democracy and the challenges of sustaining strong democratic institutions in a polarized world. Faculty interested in proposing a project should read the full submission guidelines and submit a proposal by Thursday, March 31 at 5:00 p.m.

Proposed projects may begin in Summer or Fall 2022. Funding for project teams is between $5,000 and $25,000.

Please note: This RFP is only for 2022-2023 projects related to democracy. Our next general call for Bass Connections project proposals will be in August 2022.

Background

Bass Connections brings together faculty, postdocs, graduate students, undergraduates and community partners to tackle complex societal challenges in interdisciplinary research teams. The five interdisciplinary themes of Bass Connections support research related to persistent societal challenges such as health inequities, race and social justice, environmental sustainability, the intersection of technology and society and the brain’s role in making us human.

As broad as these themes are, they are not all-encompassing, and we recognize the need to respond nimbly to new challenges confronting society. As a result, since 2018, Bass Connections has launched three “pop-up themes,” the first focused on hurricane recovery and resilience; the second on research related to immigration; and the third on issues related to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemicThis call is for project proposals related to a new pop-up theme around research related to democracy and governance in a polarized world.

Recent Threats to Democracy

By many measures – including freedom of the press, free and fair elections, and government transparency – democracy is declining in much of the world. Indeed, the nonprofit Freedom House’s 2021 report concludes that nearly 75 percent of the world’s population lived in a country that faced deteriorating conditions for democracy last year. Here in the U.S., 2021 began with an insurrection on the Capitol, to be followed by many states passing new laws restricting voting access and reconfiguring election oversight. A CNN poll from September 2021 found that 93% of Americans say that democracy is either under attack (56%) or being tested (37%). A November 2021 NPR poll found that just 62% of Americans say they will trust the 2024 election, regardless of who wins.

Bass Connections issues this special call for proposals for teams interested in tackling solutions aimed at strengthening democracy, at home or abroad, through a Bass Connections project in 2022-2023. Research questions may include, but are not limited to:

  • Why is democracy worth defending? Where has democracy proven effective, and in what contexts has it failed? What reforms might help democratic institutions live up to their ideals?
  • What has contributed to the increase in authoritarianism worldwide? What are the historical roots of these contemporary challenges, and how might the past offer critical perspective and lessons for the future of democratic ideals, institutions and practices?
  • How important are the concepts of the rule of law and the existence of an independent judiciary to democracy? How have societies effectively negotiated the trade-offs between democratic decision-making and the protection of individual and minority rights?
  • How have other emerging issues, including climate change, rising inequality and inflation, and the COVID-19 pandemic, impacted democracy in the U.S. and internationally? What interventions might seek to strengthen democratic resiliency in the face of social crises and economic inequality?
  • Access to strong local media has been linked to political engagement and increased transparency. What new models might shore up and/or invigorate local media and journalism?
  • How are the arts and humanities inspiring new conversations about democracy and polarization? How do the arts push us to think differently about democracy or inspire new and innovative forms of political organization?
  • How should technology platforms be governed to ensure accountability and promote democracy?
  • How might we restore trust in the media and voting systems, reinvigorate popular engagement in civic life, and/or fashion new institutions for popular participation in democratic processes?
  • What solutions might bridge growing levels of political polarization, or what policy changes might allow government to operate more effectively in a continuing polarized environment?

In partnership with the Digital Humanities Initiative at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, we also strongly encourage projects with a substantial digital or computational humanities dimension.

Submission Instructions

The deadline for proposals is Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 5:00 p.m.

Please read the full submission guidelines and use the online proposal form to submit your proposal. You may work directly within the online form and save and return to the form as you work. You may also preview the proposal questions and draft your responses using the following Word template.

Interested faculty, particularly those who have never led a Bass Connections team, are also encouraged to contact a Bass Connections theme leader or Laura Howes, Director of Bass Connections, at laura.howes@duke.edu with questions or to discuss potential ideas. Faculty may also drop in at any time to one of our informal Zoom office hours (https://duke.zoom.us/j/6666010362):

  • Friday, February 11, 10:00-11:00
  • Thursday, March 17, 12:00-1:00

Faculty are also welcome to reach out to members of the Bass Connections Faculty Advisory Council to discuss project ideas or possible collaborators within their school.

Learn More

50+ Bass Connections Research Opportunities for Duke Students of All Levels

Bass Connections project team members.

Deadline: February 11, 2022

Duke students and trainees/fellows from all levels and schools are invited to check out the new Bass Connections project teams for 2022-2023.

The deadline for applications is February 11 at 5:00 p.m. EST.

Bass Connections project teams bring together faculty, postdocs, graduate students and undergraduates to tackle complex societal challenges in interdisciplinary research teams. Most project teams collaborate with partners outside Duke, including companies, nonprofits, universities, school systems, hospitals and government agencies. Many team members take their research further through grants, theses and other opportunities at Duke and beyond.

Project teams last for two semesters, and some include a summer component. Academic credit and summer funding are available. Students can apply to up to three project teams.

Browse the 2022-2023 Project Teams by Theme

Each project team page contains a detailed project description, anticipated outputs, student opportunities, timelines and a list of team leaders.

Student can also browse the full list of project teams, which can be filtered by theme, area of focus and special opportunities.

Register for a Virtual Information Session

Students from all levels and schools can learn more about project team participation by registering for a virtual information session on Friday, January 21 from 2:00-3:00 p.m. or Tuesday, January 25 from 3:00-4:00 p.m..

Please register to receive the Zoom link.

Each session will feature a short presentation about the program as well as a panel of Bass Connections student team members, who will share details about their project team experiences. Session attendees will be able to ask questions live or in the group chat.

Topics covered will include:

  • What is Bass Connections? What are year-long project teams?
  • How do students find out more information about particular 2022-2023 project teams?
  • Who is eligible to participate?
  • What is the application process and timeline?
  • What is it like to be on a project team and what are the benefits of participation?
  • What should students consider before applying?

Many project teams will also be hosting their own Zoom information session and/or providing a brief video overview of their team during the weeks of January 24 and January 31. Please check our website for more information on January 24 or sign up for our newsletter.

Before You Apply

Take some time to learn how project teams work, review FAQs, explore the benefits of participation and browse stories from students about their Bass Connections experiences.

Students can also check out our Spring 2022 Foundational Research Modules – short virtual modules by experts across campus that are designed to provide students of all levels with foundational knowledge in research practices.

The deadline for applications is February 11 at 5:00 p.m. EST.

Create Your Own Path

Need some help planning your Bass Connections pathway? Undergraduates can seek guidance from Duke’s Directors of Academic Engagement, who offer individualized, hour-long advising appointments to guide students through the process of integrating Bass Connections into their academic plans.

Graduate students can access a number of resources to guide their pathways, and the professional schools offer tailored advising services to their students. Ph.D. students in the humanities can consult with Duke’s Director of Graduate Student Advising and Engagement in the Humanities.

Learn More

Support for External Organizations to Host Duke Ph.D. Student Summer Internships

View of Duke campus.

Deadline: February 4, 2022

Overview

During Summer 2022, the Duke University Provost’s Office in collaboration with the Office of Durham and Community Affairs will support professional development opportunities for current Duke Ph.D. students who do not have full summer funding. Organizations that would like to host such an opportunity may submit a proposal by February 4, 2022. Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/duke_phd_internships_external).

We are seeking Ph.D. student internships opportunities that provide Ph.D. students with research experience outside the university while remaining connected to their intellectual trajectory. To cite a few examples, in past years, Duke Ph.D. interns have engaged with:

  • The Modern Language Association to design and marketed a resource toolkit around curricular innovation and teacher training
  • Governance and Youth Economic Opportunities group at RTI International to deploy social network analysis (SNA) to facilitate international development projects, create user-friendly SNA guides and reports, and contribute to workshops and a community of practice event
  • The Consumer Protection Division of the North Carolina Attorney General’s Office to analyze regulatory developments in the European Union and report on findings to representatives from offices of Attorneys General in other states
RFP released 1/11/22
RFP deadline for submission 2/4/22 at 5:00 p.m.
Anticipated organization notification 2/11/22
Anticipated student application period 2/18 – 3/20/22
Anticipated priority application/selection period (rolling consideration thereafter) 3/21 – 3/25/22
Internship start/end 5/16 – 8/19/22

Restrictions and Parameters for Students

  • These opportunities will only be open to current Duke Ph.D. students without full summer funding. Students who will matriculate in the summer/fall of 2022 are not eligible.
  • Interested students will apply for posted opportunities through a central Duke portal, though the selection process and decision will rest with each internship host.
  • Internships can involve six weeks, eight weeks or twelve weeks of engagement, and must take place between May 16 – August 19 with no more than 19.9 hours/week, leaving time for students to engage with their own research, study and/or writing. Stipend amounts vary by the amount of time required.
  • The earliest date an internship may start is May 16, 2022; the latest an internship may end is August 19, 2022.
  • Duke Ph.D. students will receive a stipend commensurate with the three options for length of engagement paid across Duke’s June – August payroll cycles.
  • International Duke Ph.D. students who reside in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction detailed below and who wish to apply for a summer internship should consult as soon as possible with Duke Visa Services for assistance with filing applications for Curricular Practical Training and any other visa-related requirements.

Restrictions and Parameters for Host Organizations

  • Proposals from host organizations that can provide a 50% cost share on the stipend or receive Duke Office of Durham and Community Affairs stipend support (see below) will be given priority consideration. Where relevant, organizations will be invoiced in September 2022 for the stipend cost share.
Internship Duration

Stipend

Host 50% Cost Share

Three-month (19.9 hours/week)

$8,250

$4,125

Two-month (19.9 hours/week)

$5,500

$2,750

One and a half month/6-week (19.9 hours/week)

$4,125

$2,062.50

  • In an effort to support community partners unable to fund internships, regional nonprofit organizations may request support through the Duke Office of Durham and Community Affairs. To be eligible for stipend funding support, organizations must serve the regional community in one of Duke’s five strategic focus areas:
    • Community/nonprofit capacity
    • Housing affordability and infrastructure
    • Early childhood education and K-12 readiness
    • College and career readiness
    • Community health/food security and nutrition
  • Organizations requesting stipend assistance may inquire with Sandra Martinez Zuniga, sandra.martinezzuniga@duke.edu, senior program coordinator for civic engagement at the Office of Durham and Community Affairs.
  • Internship hosts must either be based in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction available for Duke employment: California, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

Selection Criteria and Review Process

Host organizations and supervisors must detail a program of work, with clear goals, deliverables, and identification of a supervisor, in their proposed job description. We encourage host organizations to plan for regular interaction with interns and to include them in team meetings. The review process will be overseen by the Duke vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Scope and Duration

In-person, remote and/or hybrid internships will be considered. The proposed internship experience should last for up to three months in the summer and proposals may be configured in one of the following formats:

  1. Three-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $8,250
  2. Two-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $5,500
  3. One and a half month/6-week internship (19.9 hours/week); intern will receive a stipend of $4,125

The proposed internship will take place between May 16 – August 19, 2022 and interns will receive a stipend paid across Duke’s June – August payroll cycles.

Proposal Requirements

Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/duke_phd_internships_external) through February 4, 2022 at 5 p.m.

You will be asked to provide the following information:

  • A title and brief description (one paragraph) for the proposed internship position
  • The number of interns your organization anticipates hosting
  • The start and end dates for the internship
  • The name and contact information for the organization/unit business manager
  • The name and contact information for the internship coordinator and the direct supervisor (if different)
  • A brief plan (maximum one page) that articulates the anticipated project or projects, describes the nature of engagement with organizational staff members, and specifies how the organization envisages a remote/virtual work experience (if relevant)
  • A confirmation of cost share, or explanation of why cost share is not possible

Contact

For questions related to the online application and/or other logistical questions, please contact Amy Feistel, amy.feistel@duke.edu.

Organizations based in the Triangle are encouraged to contact Sandra Martinez Zuniga, sandra.martinezzuniga@duke.edu, senior program coordinator for civic engagement at the Office of Durham and Community Affairs, especially if they wish to explore stipend coverage.

For questions related to internship work plans or cost sharing, please contact Edward J. Balleisen, eballeis@duke.edu, vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Support for Duke Units to Host Ph.D. Student Internships in Summer 2022

Request for proposals.

Deadline: January 28, 2022

Overview

During Summer 2022, the Provost’s Office will support professional development opportunities for current Duke Ph.D. students who do not have full summer funding. Units that would like to host such an opportunity may submit a proposal by January 28, 2022. Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/phd_internships_duke).

We are seeking Ph.D. student internship opportunities that align with Together Duke and will provide Ph.D. students with research experience connected to their intellectual trajectory. Examples from past years:

  • A Duke Forest intern assessed emerging risks to the Forest
  • Duke University Press hosted two interns who worked on an innovation team that explored digital strategies for authors to engage with readers during the pandemic
  • The Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine had an intern assist with development of curricular materials for K-12 schools
  • An intern with the Modern Language Association designed and marketed a resource toolkit around curricular innovation and teacher training.
RFP released 1/7/22
RFP deadline for submission 1/28/22 at 5:00 p.m.
Anticipated unit/program notification 2/4/22
Anticipated student application period 2/18/22 – 3/20/22
Anticipated priority application/selection period (rolling consideration thereafter) 3/21/22 – 3/25/22
Internship start/end 5/16/22 – 8/19/22

Restrictions and Parameters

  • These opportunities will only be open to current Ph.D. students without full summer funding. Students who will matriculate in the summer/fall of 2022 are not eligible.
  • Interested students will apply for posted opportunities through a central Duke portal, though the selection process and decision will rest with each internship host.
  • Internships can involve six weeks, eight weeks or twelve weeks of engagement, and must take place between May 16 – August 19 with no more than 19.9 hours/week, leaving time for students to engage with their own research, study and/or writing. Stipend amounts vary by the amount of time required.
  • The earliest date an internship may start is May 16, 2022; the latest an internship may end is August 19, 2022.
  • Ph.D. students must receive a stipend commensurate with the three options for length of engagement, plus summer health fee and fringe, paid across the June – August payroll cycles. Interns may receive other Duke summer funding; however, total Duke summer funding may not exceed $8,750. The school of any selected student will be responsible for the provision of summer tuition scholarships.
  • Any proposal for an internship must comply with Duke University coronavirus response policies and the residency requirement detailed below.
  • International Ph.D. students who reside in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction detailed below and who wish to apply for a summer internship should consult as soon as possible with Duke Visa Services for assistance with filing applications for Curricular Practical Training and any other visa-related requirements.
  • Internship hosts must either be based in North Carolina or an approved U.S. jurisdiction available for Duke employment: California, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.
  • All student interns will be required to take the experiential workshop, GS950, during Duke Summer Session I or II.

Eligibility

  • Proposals should be submitted by the head of a unit (dean, director, chair, etc.).
  • Units must provide a 50% cost share on the stipend and fringes.

Selection Criteria and Review Process

Host units and supervisors must detail a program of work, with clear goals, deliverables and identification of a supervisor, in their proposed job description. We encourage host units to plan for regular interaction with interns and to include them in team meetings. The review process will be overseen by the vice provost for interdisciplinary studies.

Scope and Duration

In-person, remote and/or hybrid internships will be considered. The proposed internship experience should last for up to three months in the summer and proposals may be configured in one of the following formats:

  1. Three-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $8,250 as well as coverage of summer tuition and health fee
  2. Two-month (19.9 hours/week) internship; intern will receive a stipend of $5,500 as well as coverage of summer tuition and health fee
  3. One and a half month/6-week internship (19.9 hours/week); intern will receive a stipend of $4,125 as well as coverage of summer tuition and health fee

The proposed internship will take place between May 16 – August 19, 2022, and interns will receive a stipend as well as coverage of summer tuition and the summer health fee across the June – August payroll cycles.

Proposal Requirements

Proposals will be accepted via Formstack (https://dukeinterdisc.formstack.com/forms/phd_internships_duke) through January 28, 2022, at 5:00 p.m. You will be asked to provide the following information:

  • Title and brief description (one paragraph) for your proposed internship position
  • Number of interns your unit anticipates hosting
  • Start and end dates for the internship
  • Name and contact information for your unit business manager
  • Name and contact information for the internship coordinator and the direct supervisor (if different)
  • Brief plan (maximum one page) that articulates the anticipated project or projects, describes the nature of engagement with organizational staff members, and specifies how the organization envisages a remote/virtual work experience (if relevant)
  • Confirmation of cost share.

Contact

For questions related to the online application and/or other logistical questions, please contact Amy Feistel, amy.feistel@duke.edu.

For questions related to internship work plans or cost sharing, please contact Edward J. Balleisen, eballeis@duke.edu.

Comments Sought in Regular Review of Director Robert Calderbank

A university committee is seeking comments as part of a regular performance review of the Rhodes Information Initiative at Duke (iiD) director Robert Calderbank. Regular reviews of initiative directors are to be conducted in the penultimate year of their term by a committee formed by the Provost in consultation with the Executive Committee of the Academic Council. Such a committee has been appointed to review Calderbank, who has served in his post since 2013.

Members of the review committee are:

  • David (Dave) Siegel, Professor of Political Science and Public Policy (chair)
  • Andrew Allen, Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics
  • Katherine Brading, Professor of Philosophy
  • Mark Chaves, Anne Firor Scott Distinguished Professor of Sociology
  • Craig Henriquez, Professor of Biomedical Engineering
  • Jianfeng Lu, Professor of Mathematics
  • Christine Payne, Yoh Family Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science
  • Brian Silliman, Rachel Carson Distinguished Professor of Marine Conservation Biology

An important part of the review process is the solicitation and consideration of comments from the university’s many constituencies. Comments on performance and suggestions for the future are important to the committee’s work.

The charge to the committee poses several questions for the review, including Calderbank’s effectiveness in the following areas:

  • ability to provide intellectual and organizational leadership for an initiative intended to equip Duke to play a leading role in data science
  • ability to develop and foster successful interdisciplinary collaborations with leadership from departments, schools and other units across campus that are directly or indirectly engaged (or have the potential to benefit from engagement) with computational and data analytics
  • effectiveness in engaging faculty from multiple schools and departments in the work of iiD – we are interested in learning why some faculty do engage with iiD while others do not
  • effectiveness in mentoring faculty leaders and pivotal senior and research staff who are responsible for directing key and emerging initiatives in iiD
  • demonstrated commitment to diversity, inclusion and excellence through leadership in hiring practices, faculty engagement, the forging of strategic priorities, and the mentoring of staff members
  • administrative competencies regarding effective management of the budget and iiD staff
  • effectiveness in engaging students—both undergraduate and graduate students—in iiD activities and programs
  • overall effectiveness as the leader of a nimble, diverse organization

The committee invites you to share your thoughts by email or letter. Communication should include the nature of your interactions with Director Calderbank so that the committee can understand the context of the comments as fully as possible. The committee will discuss responses, and a summary will be included in the written report to the Provost.

The committee would appreciate receiving comments by January 31, 2022.

Ways to respond:

Information collected will be compiled in a report which will be submitted to the Provost and the Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies at the conclusion of the review. Responses will be kept confidential. While a list of those from whom feedback is received will be part of the record, it will be in an appendix of the report which will not be shared. No comments or observations will be attributed to any individual in any report of the committee.

Explore the 2022 Data+ Projects and Apply Now

Data+ info fair.

Deadline: February 25, 2022

Interested in exploring new data-driven approaches to interdisciplinary challenges? Student applications are now open for this summer’s Data+ research program. The application deadline is February 25, but applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis, so students should apply as soon as possible.

Data+ is a full-time ten-week summer research experience for undergraduates and master’s students. Students join small teams and learn how to marshal, analyze and visualize data, while gaining broad exposure to the field of data science. In 2022, the program will run from May 23 through July 29.

Participants will receive a $5,000 stipend, out of which they must arrange their own housing and travel. Participants may not accept employment or take classes during the program.

Data+ is offered through the Rhodes Information Initiative at Duke and is part of the Bass Connections Information, Society & Culture theme. See details and apply.

Summer 2022 Data+ Projects

Information Fair

Register here for the virtual Data+ Information Fair on January 21, 1:30-3:30 p.m. EST.