THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

6:00-8:00 p.m.

 

PERFORMANCE KEYNOTE BY POET NIKKY FINNEY
Introductions by Deborah Jenson and Thavolia Glymph
Poetry Reading by Nikky Finney
Dialogue with Nikky Finney hosted by Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Hayti Heritage Center
804 Old Fayetteville St
Durham, NC 27701

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Sipping Kerosene in the Refectory: A Keynote, by a Poet-Farmer, reading from the great bounty of her almanac of words, rich with her own South Carolina grandmother's liquid luminous wisdom, (some say) greatly needed in this time of so much "official language smitheryed to sanction ignorance and preserve privilege." The poet-farmer's reading will be replete with forthrighteous forecasts, predictions, new phases of the new moon, and when and when not to plant your Phalaenopsis John Hope Franklin orchids.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2017

8:00-9:00 a.m.

Breakfast & Conference Registration

Carpenter Conference Room
Rubenstein 249
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
West Campus
Duke University

9:00-10:30 a.m.

PANEL I: "Who Breathes Easily and Why? Phenomenological and Social Determinants of Respiratory Health"
Moderator: Deborah Jenson
Panelists:
Ian Whitmarsh, PhD, Medical Anthropology, University of California-San Francisco
Havi Carel, PhD, Philosophy, University of Bristol, UK (Presenting by Skype)
Lundy Braun, PhD, Medical Science and Africana Studies, Brown University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
West Campus
Duke University

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Each panelist here represents a distinctive interdisciplinary pairing of humanities and health knowledge ecosystems about what Havi Carel calls “Life of Breath.” Ian Whitmarsh is a Medical Anthropologist at the UCSF in the School of Medicine, teaching on topics including biomedical ambiguity, racialization, asthma, and genetic research. Havi Carel is a professor of Philosophy at the University of Bristol who teaches students in medicine and philosophy a phenomenological methodology for exploration of the lived experience of illness and being on the receiving end of health care, especially in contexts of respiratory illness. Lundy Braun is a professor of Pathology, Laboratory, and Africana Studies at Brown University, who teaches the history of race, racism, and medicine to undergraduates and medical students. Their panel will address asthma, wheezing, and the “real” in political, experiential, and psychoanalytic terms, particularly in the Caribbean and its literature; the phenomenology of illness as a disruption of lived body rather than a dysfunction of biological body, generative of necessary philosophical work by patients and health care providers; and the history of U.S. medical measurement of race, class, and lung capacity.

10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP I
Concurrent

a) "Breathing for Drama and Song: The Alexander Technique"
Workshop Leader:
Eric Pritchard, Duke University
Breedlove Conference Room
349 Rubenstein Library

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This interactive workshop will introduce three of the core principles of the Alexander Technique - Cultivation of Awareness, Inhibition of Automatic Reaction, and Direction of Conscious Intention - and give participants the opportunity to experience Alexander’s unique method of improving overall coordination and increasing freedom and ease of movement. Eric Pritchard, First Violinist of the Ciompi Quartet of Duke University, will also provide background about F. M. Alexander, placing his work in historical and societal context. Alexander is regarded as one of the pioneers of the now ubiquitous mind/body and mindfulness movements, having advocated the idea of "psychophysical unity" long before it became popularized in the West. Among his contemporaries, public figures including John Dewey, Aldous Huxley, Charles Sherrington, George Bernard Shaw and Roald Dahl - studied with Alexander and wrote about the importance of his discoveries. Today, the Alexander Technique is an integral part of training for students in conservatories of music, dance and theater and it is also used by athletes and people interested in alleviating physical pain.

b) "Show and Tell: Drawing and Dramatizing Graphic Medicine"
Workshop Leaders:
MK Czerwiec (aka "Comic Nurse") RN, MA, Northwestern University
Jules Odendahl-James, PhD, Duke University
The Edge Workshop Room
127 Bostock Library

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In the elementary school classroom tradition of "show and tell," this workshop encourages participants to take up artistic practices of drawing and embodied dramatization to create and stage mini-comics related to healthcare environments and situations. Merging two artistic traditions allows participants to explore different expressionistic and empathetic scales of health care, condition, and competency.

With no pre-requisite skill level of visual art or theater, this session is open to interested creators at all levels. Learning goals include:

  • use of color, line, shape, and dimension to explore health and healthcare spaces and practices;
  • analysis of dramaturgical (story structure) to craft small scale scenes via iconography;
  • shifting of graphic narrative from page to stage via gestural language, characterization, and dialogue.

c) "Art, Philosophy, and Pathology: Neurographics"
Moderator: Miguel Rojas-Sotelo
Workshop Co-Leaders:
Libia Posada, MD, Surgery and Plastic Arts, University of Antioquia, Colombia
Len White, PhD, Neurobiology, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine
Quentin Eichbaum, MD, PhD, Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Perkins 217
Perkins Library

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This workshop opens with a presentation of Colombian artist and surgeon Libia Posada’s collaborative and community-responsive artwork about medicine, and the corresponding integration of art into her medical practice.  From early works on parallelisms between clinical and art exhibition spaces, to installations on ob-gyn practices and gender cultures, the presentation culminates with “Neurographics and Gray Matter: The Inefficacy of Reason.” Workshops with victims of forced displacement, and the visual medium of MRI images, led to these collage sketches of the brain in the style of a neuroanatomy manual. Through her Neurographics, Posada challenges the ideal of the brain as the rational “head” of civilization, associating rationalism with threats to ecology, interspecies cooperation, and health-sustaining circadian rhythms. Fellow workshop leaders Quentin Eichbaum (Pathology and Medical Education, Vanderbilt University) and Duke neuroanatomist Len White then join Posada by seguing into a workshop style discussion on metacognition in medicine including (1) the function of the human brain in cognitive and emotional monitoring and regulation;  (2) its paradoxical role as organ of both deep empathy and extreme violence; and (3) the brain as both an esthetic/visual and a material object in art.

12:15-1:15 p.m.

LUNCH

Conference attendees will be provided with a comp card to purchase a meal at on-campus locations such as Saladelia Café or the Richard H. Brodhead Center for Campus Life.

1:15-2:45 p.m.

PANEL 2: "A Conversation on Race and Medicine"
Moderator: Charmaine Royal
Panelists:
John Hoberman, PhD, University of Texas-Austin
Damon Tweedy, MD, Psychiatry, Duke University
Lola Fayanju, MD, Surgery, Duke University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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Top scholars, authors, and medical specialists discuss race and the complex sociology knowledge in medical research and practice. Geneticist, bioethicist, and African & African American Studies professor Charmaine Royal moderates a conversation with John Hoberman (professor of Germanic Studies at UT-Austin and author of several books, including the classic Black and Blue: The Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism), psychiatrist and bestselling author Damon Tweedy (Black Man in a White Coat), and surgeon Lola Fayanju, who uses a combined “big data” and community-based approach to reducing disparities in breast cancer treatment. The panel will dialogue on the racial politics of medical expertise, including the gatekeeping role of medical journal editors; comparison of JAMA and JNMA, the 100 year-old black-edited medical journal; the widespread knowledge, but paucity of correlated reform, on differential pain management for black patients, including pediatric patients; and the lack of research on career experiences of black physicians.

2:45-3:00 p.m.

BREAK

3:00-4:30 p.m.

KEYNOTE I: “Structural Competency: Assessing a New Paradigm for Race and Racisms in Medicine”
Introduction by Deborah Jenson
Jonathan Metzl, MD, PhD, Sociology and Medicine, Vanderbilt University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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The "cultural competency" approach and other medical models that emphasize cross-cultural understanding of patients are limited. Many health-related factors previously attributed to culture or ethnicity in interactions between doctors and patients also represent the downstream consequences of decisions about larger structural contexts, such as impoverished transit or food delivery systems, oppressive zoning decisions, or the pernicious effects of institutional racisms. This talk will focus on how the "structural competency" model and movement offers a new paradigm and approach to healthcare that can address the biological, socioeconomic, and racial impacts of upstream decisions on structural factors such as expanding health and wealth disparities.

4:30-5:00 p.m.

BREAK

5:00-6:30 p.m.

Panel 3: "Biotech and Its Representations in Popular Culture - 'Orphan Black'"
Moderator: Priscilla Wald
Panelists:
Everett Hamner, PhD, American Literature & Film, Western Illinois University
Rebekah Sheldon, PhD, English, Indiana University-Bloomington)
Marnie Gelbart, PhD, The Personal Genetics Education Project, Harvard Medical School
Johnny Tsun-Yi Kung, PhD, The Personal Genetics Education Project, Harvard Medical School
Cosima Herter, PhD Candidate, History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, University of Minnesota; Science Consultant, Orphan Black
Mackenzie Donaldson, Co-producer, Orphan Black

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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Orphan Black’s just-completed five-year run epitomizes serial television’s capacity to reflect and speak back to contemporary biotechnology. Produced in Toronto by BBC America, the show imagines human clones were born as early as 1984, well over a decade before Dolly the sheep appeared in Edinburgh. The fifty episodes explore multiple forms of biotech innovation, including genetic testing, gene therapy, designer babies, and radical life extension.

Featuring two major figures in Orphan Black's evolution--a co-producer and the show's science consultant--this panel also includes two geneticists and experts in public science education and two science and literature scholars interested in biotechnology, feminism, and queer theory. Moderated by Duke English and Women’s Studies professor Priscilla Wald, our conversation will probe such questions as:

~In what ways is Orphan Black representative of genetic fiction and how is it exceptional? What does this low-budget Canadian thriller say about biotechnologies like CRISPR and their cultural assimilation, in both the past and the future?

~How do we understand the series to engage differences of sexuality and gender? According to Orphan Black, how are these defined by genetics vis-à-vis environment, culture, and individual agency?

~How does the show imagine reproduction in relation to globalization, neoliberalism, and capitalism? What does Orphan Black suggest about the commodification of the life sciences, including the patenting of genomic sequences and synthetic life?

6:30-8:00 p.m.

RECEPTION
Remarks by Duke University Provost Sally Kornbluth, PhD
Performance of "The Elephant's Walk" by Marina Tsaplina of The Betes Organization

Gothic Reading Room
Rubenstein Library

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2017

9:30-10:00 a.m.

Breakfast
Carpenter Conference Room
Rubenstein 249
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
West Campus
Duke University

10:00-11:30 a.m.

PANEL 4: "Medical Memoirs and Social Agency in Planetary Perspective"
Moderator: Cate Reilly
Panelists:
Achille Mbembe, PhD, WiSER Institute, WITS University
Nolwazi Mhkwanazi, PhD, WiSER Institute, WITS University
Juan Obarrio, PhD, Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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From a patient’s medical memoir to a medical team’s memoir, this panel teases apart the place of the “auto”—the autobiographical, the autonomous, the self—in narrative and in social upheaval. It does so through a series of contrasts: narrative and auto-immunity; narrative and apartheid; narrative and death. Political philosopher Achille Mbembe evokes “Mandela’s Last Breath,” through exploration of the theme of breathing (both the possibility and the impossibility of breathing as a metaphor of life and death) in the memoir by the head of Nelson Mandela’s medical team, Dr. Vejay Ramlakan. Medical humanities researcher Nolwazi Mkhwanazi comments on medicine, politics, the self, and futures, in a reading of apartheid-era and post-apartheid memoirs by two black South African physicians, William Pick, and Maria Phalime. And Anthropologist Juan Obarrio presents excerpts of a patient’s medical memoir, “Foreign Body,” in which personal narratives connect the experience of auto-immune illness with scenes of totalitarianism and crisis of democracy, moments of violence, and movements of global displacement.

11:30-11:45 a.m.

BREAK

11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP 2
Concurrent

a) "Moral Imagination in Chronic Illness: Creativity, Risk, Kinship with Illness, Embracing Complexity and the Unknown"
Perkins 217
Workshop Leader: Marina Tsaplina of The Betes Organization

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Moral Imagination in Chronic Illness: Creativity, Risk, Illness as Teacher, Embracing Complexity and the Unknown

"Healing pursues a simple goal: feeling like a person again.
And feeling like a person requires the journey to 're-story' place and belonging."
- The Poetic Unfolding of the Human Spirit, John Paul Lederach,
Essays on Exploring a Global Dream

In this 90 minute participatory workshop, I will share some quick scenes and ideas from my work the THE BETES Organization in how we create "living metaphors" from the chronic illness experience that serves people with chronic illness, caregivers and healthcare providers to find meaning and resilience.

I will lead you through a series of simple and accessible theater and improvisation exercises to begin to embody some of these concepts in your own bodies, exploring how chronic illness can create a sense of fracture and disembodiment in the person. As a group, we will explore and experiment with the multiple pathways of how we might guide people back into finding a sense of integrated wholeness.

The workshop is framed through the lens of how the creative, empathic, kinesthetic imagination is a forgotten and deeply needed force in healthcare today, specifically applied in the context of chronic illness where the promise of a "cure" often remains at odds with the reality of being alive and searching for joy today.

b) "Being Comfortable with Being Uncomfortable: Using Theater and Film to Explore Implicit Bias in Health Care"
The Edge Workshop Room
127 Bostock Library
Workshop Co-Leaders:
Neil Prose MD, Pediatrics and Dermatology, Duke University School of Medicine
Raymond Barfield MD, Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Christian Philosophy, Duke Divinity School
Rhonda Klevansky, Photographer, Writer, and Film Maker
Candace Brown, PhD, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
Anita Woodley, Emmy Award Winning Journalist, Producer, Actress, Poet, Mixed-media Folk Artist, Baker, and Playwright

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In the first segment of this workshop, a collaborative team of physicians and a film maker will discuss and show a segment of "Keepers of the House," a work in progress. This innovative documentary will highlight the remarkable therapeutic relationships that develop over time between hospital housekeepers and patients and their families.

In the second segment, Anita Woodley, Emmy Award-Winning Journalist and Health Education Ethnodrama Entertainer, will perform the story of an African-American patient with a gunshot wound. Participants will interact with various characters in the drama, as Anita embodies narratives culled from underrepresented communities. She will create a safe space for honest dialogue about the discomforts of social justice, bias, and health inequity in our society.

1:15-2:15 p.m.

BOX LUNCH

2:15-3:45 p.m.

PANEL 5: "Health, Loss, and the Biopolitical Distribution of Affect"
Moderator: Nicole Barnes
Panelists:
Christina Crosby, PhD, English, Wesleyan University
Colbey Reid, PhD, Chair of Fashion Studies, Columbia College Chicago
Cristobal Silva, PhD, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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Three humanities scholars probe health and its environments through the overlapping frames of affect, history, and design in disability studies. Colbey Reid, opening in a visual register for her presentation on "Cripping Style," looks at the history and contemporaneity of disabled human forms in interior and fashion design. She contextualizes this work on disability and environment as an intervention in “universal design” conversations, and explores the historical and future centrality of design and environment in medical treatment plans. Cristobal Silva analyzes the racial/imperial distribution of the homesickness disorder called nostalgia in the eighteenth century. Nostalgia, which was believed to follow a fatal course, was found primarily in 18th century colonial environments and yet not among Africans, even though slaves were considered subject to the related affliction of melancholy. The epistemic inclusion of slaves of African heritage in nostalgia did not occur until the nineteenth century. Silva “hears” in that archival silence on the African experience of an affect found in colonial biopolitical formation, forces shaping the evolution of modern colonial medicine and the modern field of history. Christina Crosby, author of A Body Undone: Living On After Great Pain, explores through her writing “what remains” of the body after an incapacitating transformation, in a complexly affective environment of loss. She considers the promise of a melancholic politics that holds on to lost bodies, one that even seeks to raise the dead, as Toni Morrison does in her incandescent novel, Beloved. Remembering what is irretrievably lost and sustaining the harrowing of grief can prepare us for a future now foreclosed.

3:45-4:00 p.m.

BREAK

4:00-5:30 p.m.

KEYNOTE 2: "Don't Breathe a Word: A Psychoanalysis of Medicine's Inflations"
Introduction by Margaret Humphreys
Alan Bleakley, PhD, Plymouth University Peninsula School of Medicine:

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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Taking the triple themes of breath, voice and body as they relate to health humanities and social justice, this talk puts medicine on the couch to inquire into the origins of, and potential treatments for, its major symptom of cultural inflation. Chronic symptoms of medicine's own making include (mis)shaping by the metaphors of 'body as a machine' and 'medicine as war'; identity issues of heroic masculinist and over determinism, linked to both compromising patient safety and poor self care; and refusal of democratic habits. Three themes will address these symptoms: first, the aerial imagination of medicine (breath; second, deflating medicine's inflations to find a new identity (voice); and third, the role of a medical/health humanities in challenging ideals of 'health' as survival of the fittest, to promote a radical 'survival of the sickest' (body). The talk articulates a new voice for medicine and medical education that is collaborative, feminine, and grounded in hospitality.

5:30-6:15 p.m.

Transportation to East Campus, and Break

6:15-7:30 p.m.

ART EXHIBIT AND RECEPTION
"Be Patient: The Art of Medical Engagement" ("Se Paciente: El arte de la medicina"), by Libia Posada. Includes visual documentation of the migration-related body art project, "Cardinal Signs," and involves medical and artistic engaged practices.

Frederic Jameson Gallery
115 Friedl Building
Duke East Campus

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Description to come.

7:30 p.m.

Walk to Baldwin Theater on East Campus; handicapped van available by registration

8:00 p.m.

Songs of Journey: A gala concert featuring the premiere of Stephen Jaffe's Migrations and Mahler's Songs of a Wayfarer
Free admission
Program Includes:
Bright Sheng: The Stream Flows with Hsiao-mei Ku, violin soloist
Penka Kouneva (Ph.D. composition, 1997): "Scherzo" from String Quartet No. 1, performed by the Ciompi Quartet
Gustav Mahler: Songs of a Wayfarer (Schoenberg chamber arrangement) with Susan Dunn, soprano soloist
Stephen Jaffe: Migrations (premier) with Gabriel Richard, violin soloist
Featuring conductors Stephen Jaffe & Rodney Wynkoop leading a faculty/student chamber orchestra

Baldwin Auditorium
Duke East Campus

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This concert explores themes of migration and immigration, featuring Bright Sheng's "The Stream Flows," Hsiao-mei Ku, violin soloist; Penka Kouneva: "Scherzo" from String Quartet No. 1, performed by the Ciompi Quartet; Mahler: "Songs of a Wayfarer" with Susan Dunn, soloist; and the premiere of Stephen Jaffe's "Migrations" (Chamber Concerto No. 4, for violin and ensemble) with Gabriel Richard, violin soloist. Featuring conductors Stephen Jaffe and Rodney Wynkoop leading a faculty/student chamber orchestra. Duke alumna Penka Kouneva is a composer whose work has been heard widely in her scores for film, video games and the theater including games like "Prince of Persia" and a recent documentary for NASA: "Heroes and Legends." An emigré from Bulgaria, Penka came to Duke in 1989, becoming the first graduate of Music's Ph.D. program in composition in 1997. Stephen Jaffe's "Migrations," premiering at this concert, was commissioned by Kouneva for the Duke University Department of Music. Soprano Susan Dunn, performing Mahler's "Songs of a Wayfarer," has demonstrated her gifts on the world's most challenging stages, including La Scala in Milan, Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall, and the Vienna State Opera, among others. She made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera in 1990.