THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

6:00-8:00 p.m.

PERFORMANCE KEYNOTE BY POET NIKKY FINNEY
Introductions by Deborah Jenson and Thavolia Glymph
Poetry Reading by Nikky Finney
Dialogue with Nikky Finney hosted by Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Hayti Heritage Center
804 Old Fayetteville St
Durham, NC 27701

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2017

8:00-9:00 a.m.

Breakfast & Conference Registration

Carpenter Conference Room
Rubenstein 249
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
West Campus
Duke University

9:00-10:30 a.m.

PANEL I: "Who Breathes Easily and Why? Phenomenological and Social Determinants of Respiratory Health"
Moderator: Deborah Jenson
Panelists:
Ian Whitmarsh, PhD, Medical Anthropology, University of California-San Francisco
Havi Carel, PhD, Philosophy, University of Bristol, UK (Presenting by Skype)
Lundy Braun, PhD, Medical Science and Africana Studies, Brown University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
West Campus
Duke University

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10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP I
Concurrent

a) "Breathing for Drama and Song: The Alexander Technique"
Workshop Leader:
Eric Pritchard, Duke University
Perkins 217
Perkins Library

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This interactive workshop will introduce three of the core principles of the Alexander Technique - Awareness, Inhibition of Automatic Reaction, and Direction of Conscious Intention. Musician and faculty member Eric Pritchard will provide background about F. M. Alexander, placing his work in historical and societal context. Alexander is regarded as one of the pioneers of the now ubiquitous mind/body and mindfulness movements, having advocated the idea of "psychophysical unity" long before it became popularized in the West. Among his contemporaries, public figures including John Dewey, Aldous Huxley, Charles Sherrington, George Bernard Shaw and Roald Dahl - studied with Alexander and wrote about the importance of his discoveries.

b) "Show and Tell: Drawing and Dramatizing Graphic Medicine"
Workshop Leaders:
MK Czerwiec (aka "Comic Nurse") RN, MA, Northwestern University
Jules Odendahl-James, PhD, Duke University
The Edge Workshop Room
127 Bostock Library

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In the elementary school classroom tradition of "show and tell," this workshop encourages participants to take up artistic practices of drawing and embodied dramatization to create and stage mini-comics related to healthcare environments and situations. Merging two artistic traditions allows participants to explore different expressionistic and empathetic scales of health care, condition, and competency.

With no pre-requisite skill level of visual art or theater, this session is open to interested creators at all levels. Learning goals include:

  • use of color, line, shape, and dimension to explore health and healthcare spaces and practices;
  • analysis of dramaturgical (story structure) to craft small scale scenes via iconography;
  • shifting of graphic narrative from page to stage via gestural language, characterization, and dialogue.

c) "Art, Philosophy, and Pathology: Neurographics"
Moderator: Miguel Rojas-Sotelo
Workshop Co-Leaders:
Libia Posada, MD, Surgery and Plastic Arts, University of Antioquia, Colombia
Len White, PhD, Neurobiology, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine
Quentin Eichbaum, MD, PhD, Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Duke Institute for Brain Sciences (DIBS). Registered participants will walk to DIBS at 10:35 a.m., or take a handicapped access van.

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12:15-1:15 p.m.

LUNCH

Conference attendees will be provided with a comp card to purchase a meal at on-campus locations such as Saladelia Café or the Richard H. Brodhead Center for Campus Life.

1:15-2:45 p.m.

PANEL 2: "A Conversation on Race and Medicine"
Panelists:
John Hoberman, PhD, University of Texas-Austin
Damon Tweedy, MD, Psychiatry, Duke University
Oluwadamilola Fayanju, MD, Surgery, Duke University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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2:45-3:00 p.m.

BREAK

3:00-4:30 p.m.

KEYNOTE I: “Structural Competency: Assessing a New Paradigm for Race and Racisms in Medicine”
Jonathan Metzl, MD, PhD, Sociology and Medicine, Vanderbilt University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library 

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The "cultural competency" approach and other medical models that emphasize cross-cultural understanding of patients are limited. Many health-related factors previously attributed to culture or ethnicity in interactions between doctors and patients also represent the downstream consequences of decisions about larger structural contexts, such as impoverished transit or food delivery systems, oppressive zoning decisions, or the pernicious effects of institutional racisms. This talk will focus on how the "structural competency" model and movement offers a new paradigm and approach to healthcare that can address the biological, socioeconomic, and racial impacts of upstream decisions on structural factors such as expanding health and wealth disparities.

4:30-5:00 p.m.

BREAK

5:00-6:30 p.m.

Panel 3: "Biotech and Its Representations in Popular Culture - 'Orphan Black'"
Moderator: Priscilla Wald
Panelists:
Everett Hamner, PhD, American Literature & Film, Western Illinois University
Rebekah Sheldon, PhD, English, Indiana University-Bloomington)
Marnie Gelbart Carey, PhD, The Personal Genetics Education Project, Harvard Medical School
Johnny Tsun-Yi Kung, PhD, The Personal Genetics Education Project, Harvard Medical School
Cosima Herter, PhD Candidate, History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, University of Minnesota; Science Consultant, Orphan Black
Mackenzie Donaldson, Co-producer, Orphan Black

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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6:30-8:00 p.m.

RECEPTION
Remarks by Duke University Provost Sally Kornbluth, PhD
Performance of "The Elephant's Walk" by Marina Tsaplina of The Betes Organization

Von der Heyden Pavilion
Perkins Library

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2017

9:30-10:00 a.m.

Breakfast
Carpenter Conference Room
Rubenstein 249
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
West Campus
Duke University

10:00-11:30 a.m.

PANEL 4: "Medical Memoirs and Social Agency in Planetary Perspective"
Panelists:
Achille Mbembe, PhD, WiSER Institute, WITS University
Nolwazi Mhkwanazi, PhD, WiSER Institute, WITS University
Sarah Nuttall, PhD, Director, WiSER Institute, WITS University
Juan Obarrio, PhD, Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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11:30-11:45 a.m.

BREAK

11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m.

INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP 2
Concurrent

a) "Moral Imagination in Chronic Illness: Creativity, Risk, Kinship with Illness, Embracing Complexity and the Unknown"
Perkins 217
Workshop Leader: Marina Tsaplina of The Betes Organization

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b) "Being Comfortable with Being Uncomfortable: Using Theater and Film to Explore Implicit Bias in Health Care"
The Edge Workshop Room
127 Bostock Library
Workshop Co-Leaders:
Neil Prose MD, Pediatrics and Dermatology, Duke University School of Medicine
Raymond Barfield MD, Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, Christian Philosophy, Duke Divinity School
Rhonda Klevansky, Photographer, Writer, and Film Maker
Candace Brown, PhD, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
Deborah Gold, PhD, Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Anita Woodley, Emmy Award Winning Journalist, Producer, Actress, Poet, Mixed-media Folk Artist, Baker, and Playwright

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In the first segment of this workshop, a collaborative team of physicians and a film maker will discuss and show a segment of "Keepers of the House," a work in progress. This innovative documentary will highlight the remarkable therapeutic relationships that develop over time between hospital housekeepers and patients and their families.

In the second segment, Anita Woodley, Emmy Award-Winning Journalist and Health Education Ethnodrama Entertainer, will perform the story of an African-American patient with a gunshot wound. Participants will interact with various characters in the drama, as Anita embodies narratives culled from underrepresented communities. She will create a safe space for honest dialogue about the discomforts of social justice, bias, and health inequity in our society.

1:15-2:15 p.m.

BOX LUNCH

2:15-3:45 p.m.

PANEL 5: "Health, Loss, and the Biopolitical Distribution of Affect"
Panelists:
Christina Crosby, PhD, English, Wesleyan University
Colbey Reid, PhD, Poole School of Management, North Carolina State University
Cristobal Silva, PhD, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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3:45-4:00 p.m.

BREAK

4:00-5:30 p.m.

KEYNOTE 2: "Don't Breathe a Word: A Psychoanalysis of Medicine's Inflations"
Alan Bleakley, PhD, Plymouth University Peninsula School of Medicine:

Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room
Rubenstein 153
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

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Taking the triple themes of breath, voice and body as they relate to health humanities and social justice, this talk puts medicine on the couch to inquire into the origins of, and potential treatments for, its major symptom of cultural inflation. Chronic symptoms of medicine's own making include (mis)shaping by the metaphors of 'body as a machine' and 'medicine as war'; identity issues of heroic masculinist and over determinism, linked to both compromising patient safety and poor self care; and refusal of democratic habits. Three themes will address these symptoms: first, the aerial imagination of medicine (breath; second, deflating medicine's inflations to find a new identity (voice); and third, the role of a medical/health humanities in challenging ideals of 'health' as survival of the fittest, to promote a radical 'survival of the sickest' (body). The talk articulates a new voice for medicine and medical education that is collaborative, feminine, and grounded in hospitality.

5:30-6:15 p.m.

Transportation to East Campus by Bus, and Break

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6:15-7:30 p.m.

ART EXHIBIT AND RECEPTION
"Be Patient: The Art of Medical Engagement" ("Se Paciente: El arte de la medicina"), by Libia Posada. Includes visual documentation of the migration-related body art project, "Cardinal Signs."

Frederic Jameson Gallery
115 Friedl Building
Duke East Campus

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7:30 p.m.

Walk to Baldwin Theater on East Campus; handicapped van available by registration

8:00 p.m.

Songs of Journey: A gala concert featuring the premiere of Stephen Jaffe's Migrations and Mahler's Songs of a Wayfarer
Free admission
Program Includes:
Bright Sheng: The Stream Flows with Hsiao-mei Ku, violin soloist
Penka Kouneva (Ph.D. composition, 1997): "Scherzo" from String Quartet No. 1, performed by the Ciompi Quartet
Gustav Mahler: Songs of a Wayfarer (Schoenberg chamber arrangement) with Susan Dunn, soprano soloist
Stephen Jaffe: Migrations (premier) with Gabriel Richard, violin soloist
Featuring conductors Stephen Jaffe & Rodney Wynkoop leading a faculty/student chamber orchestra

Baldwin Auditorium
Duke East Campus

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