Interdisciplinary

Selected interdisciplinary coursework:

  • Technology Commercialization (I&E 281)

    • Description: This course provided an overview of the key aspects any technology startup has to consider, including customer segmentation, value proposition, intellectual property, market strategy, regulatory compliance etc. The professors specifically discussed these strategies within the context of tech and biotech innovation, but many of the entrepreneurial challenges are shared regardless the area of concentration.
    • Relation to GC focus: I took this course freshman spring when I was still trying to figure out how I wanted to shape my college experience. Reflecting back, this was absolutely the right course at the right time. I was delighted to tap into Rob’s extraordinary expertise on what it takes to get innovation in the life sciences to market. I would later work for Rob for a summer and become involved with his New Ventures group at OLV for 2 years.
    • Term completed: Spring 2017
    • Total hours: 80
  • Strategies for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (I&E 352)

    • This was the only undergraduate course taught at Fuqua Business School and a required keystone course for my I&E certificate. We covered a breadth of topics including problem identification, lean methodology, basic finance, accounting, marketing, pitching, teamwork, mentorship, work culture etc. We also studied many cases of business success and failures throughout the semester.
    • Term completed: Spring 2018
    • Total hours: 80
  • Innovation and Entrepreneurship Capstone (I&E 499)

    • This is a required course for seniors in the I&E certificate program. I was really lucky when I took the course because Dr. Dinin made innovation in healthcare the overall theme that semester. He invited guest speakers outlining the multitude of unique challenges in the healthcare industry, and connected us with various stakeholders in healthcare. We broke into 4 teams for our final project, and my group focused on devising a strategy to accelerate the adoption of sequencing technologies for preventative medicine. We interviewed 16 experts both within academia and industry, including Dr. Geoff Ginsburg at Duke, who generously supported our project. At the end, we authored a white paperdetailing the lessons we learned by analyzing the adoption patterns of past diagnostic technologies and interviewing current experts in sequencing.
    • Term completed: Fall 2019
    • Total hours: 80

 

  • Communicating Science (BIOETHIC 502S)

    • Description: This course is an examination of the challenges and best practices for communicating scientific and bioethical issues to the public, the media, and policymakers. It explores historical and cultural factors that influence public understanding of and attitudes toward scientific and bioethical issues. Students will draw on communication case studies from a variety of disciplines (genetics, neuroscience, law, bioethics) and their own academic interests as a context for developing writing and speaking skills essential for clear communication of complex topics to non-specialists.
    • Relation to GC focus: Public engagement is an essential but often overlooked step in scientific research. In this class, we discussed and practiced many ways to communicate scientific findings to the public, including: TED talks, policy brief, op-ed, video, cocktail party conversation etc. It trained me to think from the perspective of the audience when I’m communicating my message. I have since used the approaches I learned while presenting my research poster to non-scientists, including a group of high schoolers during the summer. I used lots of analogies and hopefully inspired several young minds to pursue biomedical engineering to improve human health.
    • See my published scipol brief here
    • Term completed: Fall 2017
    • Total hours: 80