Innovation & Translational Grants Awarded

Studying Skin: Inaugural Research Support Grants Given to Two Skin Disease Projects

The Duke Pinnell Center for Investigative Dermatology are pleased to announce the recipients of the Translational and Innovative Research Support Program awards for 2015. 

The program provides new and established investigators support for studies that assist in translation and for finding partners for the development of new diagnostics, devices, and therapies for the management of skin diseases. The program places particular emphasis on funding translational milestones that are not well supported by NIH hypothesis driven research.

The following projects were each awarded $25,000 in funding:

Innate Immunity in GvHD
Amanda MacLeod, MD, Assistant Professir, Department of Dermatology, Duke University

Viscoelastic Characterization of Skin using Shear Wave Elasticity
Mark Palmeri, MD, PhD, Assistant Research Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University

 

 

Studying Skin: Inaugural Research Support Grants Given to Three Skin Disease Projects

The Duke Pinnell Center for Investigative Dermatology are pleased to announce the recipients of the Translational and Innovative Research Support Program awards for 2014. 

The program provides new and established investigators support for studies that assist in translation and for finding partners for the development of new diagnostics, devices, and therapies for the management of skin diseases. The program places particular emphasis on funding translational milestones that are not well supported by NIH hypothesis driven research.

The following projects were each awarded $25,000 in funding:

Mastoparan: A Potent Broad Spectrum Therapy for Bacterial Skin Infections
Soman Abraham, PhD, Professor, Department of Pathology, Duke University
Herman F. Staats, PhD, Professor, Department of Pathology, Duke University
Kam W. Leong, PhD, Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University

The project involves examining the antibacterial effect of Mastoparan, a derivative of a potent natural antibacterial agent. The researchers will formulate this agent into a drug delivery device and examine the therapeutic effect of this formulation in combating skin infections.

Improving Wound Healing with Nucleic Acid Scavenging Nanofibers
Bruce A. Sullenger, PhD, Professor, Department of Surgery, Duke University
Howard Levinson, MD, Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Duke University

Chronic wounds affect approximately 5.7 million patients a year and cost an estimated 20 billion dollars annually. Complications from chronic wounds are primarily attributed to biofilm formation. Studies show that the presence of extracellular DNA is required for biofilm formation and maintenance, and that removal of extracellular DNA prevents the formation and maintenance of biofilms in vitro. This project will examine whether a polycationic nanofiber mesh can prevent or disassemble biofilms through removal of extracellular DNA from the wound bed.

Improving Clinical Scoring of Chronic Cutaneous Graft-versus-Host Disease using a Novel Imaging Technology
Adela Rambi G. Cardones, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Dermatology, Duke University
Mark Palmeri, MD, PhD, Assistant Research Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University

Chronic Graft-versus-host disease (cGHVD) is the major cause of late non-relapse mortality after allogeneic Human Stem Cell Transplantation. However, there is a lack of reliable, reproducible clinical and objective measures for the cutaneous manifestation of cGHVD. This multidisciplinary team has been developing a novel ultrasound technology to quantify cutaneous sclerosis. This project will compare the ultrasound technology (Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) and Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI)) with histologic and electron microscopic measurements of the affected skin.

https://www.dtmi.duke.edu/news/studying-skin-inaugural-research-support-grants-given-three-skin-disease-projects