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MEngagement Career Committee Faculty Interviews: Dr. Andrew Hilton

Andrew Hilton Engineering faculty studio headshot

By: Tara Gu, MEng 2015

Brief Biography: Dr. Andrew Hilton is an Assistant Professor of the Practice in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Duke University, and the Managing Director of Graduate Studies for Electrical and Computer Engineering. He’s the recipient of 2015 Klein Family Distinguished Teaching Award and teaches ECE 551 and 550, which are very popular foundation programming courses. Before coming to Duke, he was an Advisory Engineer at IBM.

Q: You mentioned in class that you enjoyed programming when you were young. How did you get in the field of Computer Architecture specifically? 

A: I was an undergrad at Georgia Tech, working in compilers and programming languages. I also went to UPenn for a PhD in programming languages. When I was there, I took a graduate a computer architecture course, much like ECE 552 here at Duke. I really enjoyed the class. The programming languages research happening at Penn was much more theoretical, proving things about type systems, which wasn’t exactly what I was interested in. So, I switched to computer architecture in my second semester.

Q: What did you work on at IBM?

A: I did performance modeling in support of a core under development, much like the simulator students work with in ECE 552, but much more advanced. I got to influence the design a lot. One of the things I did was go to the designers and tell them “you can do this, and this is why: it improves IPC (instructions per cycle) by 2%”. The designers might say, “2% is great, but we can’t implement this; can we do this instead?” Then I would work with them to find a middle ground, and might find something that improves by say 1.8%, which they could implement. I also did performance verification, where I took the VHDL code for the core, and ran it. There was an infrastructure that recorded on what cycles various things happened for each instruction. I compared that with our software simulations. When they didn’t match up, I worked with the designers to fix it and tried to find alternative solutions in the middle.

Q: Given your experience in the industry, what qualities do successful engineers possess? What personality traits have helped them succeed in their field/business?

A: One of the most important qualities in not only engineering, but any profession, is discipline under pressure. Doing it right, and precisely, the way you’re supposed to, under time pressure. Not panicking when things are going wrong. It’s important when you’re developing software because you can’t say “I only have 2 days left, so I’m going to skip testing this code,” and get the product out of the door. You’re better off in many ways to test it while you build it, and sticking to a disciplined approach. For engineering specifically, problem solving, creativity (i.e. solve problems in ways that aren’t immediately apparent) are also very important.

Q: You emphasize for students to develop both foundation (good programming skills) and technical depth (knowledge of a sub-field) in order to have the best chance in finding a job. However, companies like Google, Microsoft, and Facebook give interviewees generic live coding questions, instead of asking them about their technical depth. How do you think students can advertise their technical depth to companies in their job search process?

A: First, if you want to have a programming job, you need to be a good programmer. A lot of programming interviews are trying to separate who can program and who can’t. If you can’t program, you can’t get a programming job. Beyond that, emphasizing technical depth comes into the kind of jobs you’re looking at. Take you for example (referring to me as his student). If you take classes and are interested in distributed systems and performance, you apply to cloud-related jobs over machine learning jobs. After you get past the “can you code” stage, people will start asking you to talk about deeper things. If you apply for a machine learning job, you would be lost because you haven’t taken any machine learning classes.

There are two ways you can sell yourself. Take me for example. I’m an excellent programmer, so I could sell myself simply as “I’m a coder”, but my skill set goes much deeper than that. A better way to sell myself is “I’m a micro-architect, with a firm knowledge of performance modeling, optimization, parallelism, and compilers”. The later sets you up for a much more advanced position, and, of course, still requires great programming skills. You should apply to specific jobs that match your area of expertise.

Also, a lot of students worry so much about getting a job that they sound very desperate and unconfident. If you are good at programming, you should know that and be very confident. Language and cultural skills are also important. Some people are technically proficient, but if they can’t explain things well, it’s hard to tell they’re technically proficient. Even if you can convey that you are good at what you do, the interviewer is going to be thinking about how you will work in teams. If it would be difficult for you to integrate into a work environment where you need to communicate in English, they will probably want to consider another candidate.

Alumni Spotlight: Kevin Seybert, GE Aviation

By: Wesley Cohen, MEng ’16, MEngagement Career Committee Chair and Christina Plante, Assistant Director of Career Services

In an effort to maintain alumni relationships, the MEngagement Committee caught up with MEnger Kevin Seybert to learn more about his current role at General Electric.

1) Where are you today and what are you doing? (Company, Position, Responsibilities)

2bedd0eI am working with GE Aviation, in the Edison Engineering Development Program (EEDP). It is a three-year development program consisting of three one-year rotations, leadership training and technical education, which can include a Masters degree (though, coming from MEng, I forewent the Masters as I already had one).

My first role was in the turbine design group of the Product Engineering Center. This was a technical role largely in the military space, where I was responsible for turbine structures (casings, seals and shroud supports) for a number of engine lines spanning from turboshaft helicopter engines (CT7/T700) to turbofan military fighter engines (F414). As a hardware owner, I had responsibilities spanning from legacy engines (field support, MRB support, Component Improvement Programs for US Navy and Finnish Air Force) to development engines (engine test support for F414-INS6 Indian Air Force variant) to early-stage concept redesign (F414 Enhanced Engine for the USN).

My second, and current, role is with Flight Test Operations (FTO) in California, where we own two Boeing 747s on which we test development commercial engines such as GEnx, Passport, LEAP, and GE90. Out here, I am a flight test integration engineer, and I am currently the integration lead for the LEAP-1A (Airbus) flight test program. This is a less technical role and more of a project management position. I am the engine-to-aircraft engine focal, coordinating between Systems, flight test directors, Airbus, the engine hardware owners, Performance & Operability engineers, instrumentation, and data systems. I am essentially responsible for all ground operations, making sure everything necessary gets done to get the engine on-wing and the plane in the air on schedule (on a ridiculously fast-paced schedule set at the executive level).

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2) How has the MEng program helped you in your current position?

The technical courses I took at MEng definitely helped in my first (technical) role, although since I was doing structures work and most of my coursework was in aerodynamics, it wasn’t directly applicable.

The management portion of MEng is the huge aspect that I am drawing from in my current role. The technical- and non-technical team projects helped me learn how to stick to deadlines, keep modes of communication between multidisciplinary teams, and deal with difficult/conflicting personalities.

3) What is one thing you suggest that a current MEng student takes advantage of while here?

With the assumption that most MEng’ers are looking to go into industry rather than academia, my advice would be to seek out project-based and team-based courses and try to treat them as a real-world work situation rather than something you have to do for a grade. Try to take a leadership position within a team-based course. Even if you are not an assigned leader, take initiative and show leadership qualities at team meetings. It is much more difficult to get this kind of “practice” once you enter an established technology company with senior-level engineers who have been around for 20+ years. MEng is a great opportunity to develop these leadership and interpersonal skills in a technical setting.

Industry Roundtable: 

In conclusion of this interview, Kevin also agreed to host an industry roundtable with a small group of students to discuss his different roles further, explain industry trends, and give advice for those interested in aviation and GE. The purpose of roundtables is for students to learn more about industries of interest, build relationships with alumni, and get personal questions answered about how to be successful in that field.

Kevin discussed elements of design, development, testing, production, materials, flight test operations and meeting strict deadlines with expensive equipment in his roles. He talked about how the Edison Engineering Development Program has allowed him to gain exposure in technical and managerial roles in a short period of time. He stressed the importance of communication and building relationships with at least one point person in different teams. He also mentioned being willing to help others when they need it is crucial to team development.

The Engineering Masters Career Services Team and MEngagement Committee really appreciate Kevin’s interest and continued involvement in connecting with current Duke Students.

New Digs for DUhatch

By: Samyuktha Sundar, Student Coordinator DuHatch, MEMP ’16 and Ric Telford, Adjunct Associate Professor, Executive in Residence

On September 3rd, The Foundry had its Open House,DUhatch2 revealing to everyone this amazing new 7,600 square foot facility on the ground floor of Gross Hall. The Foundry serves as “maker space” for students, faculty and staff who have an idea and want to build it from the ground up. Given the mission and vision of the Foundry, it became a perfect new location for DUhatch, Duke’s technology incubator program. Earlier this month, DUhatch completed its relocation to the Foundry and is ready to start the next step of a journey that began 5 years ago.

DUhatch (short for Duke UnDUhatch1iversity hatchery) was first conceived in 2011 as a subsidiary of then Duke Student Ventures. Duke has always had its share of budding entrepreneurs, and the time seemed right to start developing more tools that could help the entrepreneur community at Duke.   Space was carved out in the Teer building and DUhatch came to life in 2011 with a well-attended kickoff event.

The mission of DUhatch is fairly straight forward. DUhatch is committed to helping incubate new ideas on campus by providing space, equipment, mentorship, and a network for student success.   There are anywhere from 5 -10 teams at any given time in DUhatch and they provide a wide range of product and service solutions.

One of the more well-known graduates of DUhatch was Tatiana Birgisson. Tatiana started Mati Energy drink – a healthy alternative to today’s energy drinks. Tatiana was a Google DemoDay winner and continues to build her company by working out of the American Underground in Durham.

DUhatch is now part of larger, coordinated efforts across Duke focusing on Innovation and Entrepreneurship (I&E). We coordinate with the leadership in the Duke I&E organization to ensure we complement activities across the campus.

Today, we have a record-high 10 teams that call DUhatch home and they represent a wide variety of new business ideas, including:

  • FarmShots: Image analysis to help farmers and agronomists
  • Physao: Remote monitoring platform for chronic lung conditions
  • BioMetrix: Motion capture wearable sensors
  • Genie: Peer-to-peer service provider
  • Mentormee: Mobile mentoring platform
  • Tiba Health: Wearable device for patient adherence

Come by and see the DUhatch digs next time you are in Gross Hall – we can be found in workspaces 45 and 47. If you are interested in learning more about DUhatch, check out our website. For more information, subscribe to our listserv by clicking here.

 

What I Learned Preparing for Career Fairs

By: Wesley Cohen, MEng ’16

After attending TechConnect, Duke’s Fall Career Fair, and the NC State Career Fair, I learned a lot about how to prepare more effectively for these events. The following points are the most important techniques I learned for successfully approaching career fairs.

Before Career Fair

Polish your Resume: Make sure your resume looks professional and is free of typos. Schedule a one-on-one appointment well before the career fair with a career counselor to review your resume.

Update your LinkedIn Profile: Make sure your LinkedIn profile is updated and professional. Schedule a one-on-one appointment well before the career fair with a career counselor to make sure your LinkedIn profile is strong. Every employer will look at your LinkedIn.

Research Employers: Research employers before the career fair that way you can create a list of employers that you want to talk to. This will allow you to maximize your time at the career fair and to think of intelligent questions to ask employers. For the Duke Career Fair and TechConnect, plan on visiting around 5 employers. For the NC State Career Fair, plan on visiting around 8 employers each day.

Have a Plan: Create an order of employers you want to talk. It makes sense to talk to the employer that interests you the least first and then to meet with the employers that interest you the most later on.

Prepare your Elevator Pitch: This is also known as the 30 second introduction.

A general structure to follow is:

1) Your Name

2) Major and Program

3) A couple of sentences highlighting your experience

4) Something you find interesting about the company that shows you did your research

5) Connect your experience to a project, division, or position at the company

6) End with a question that is specific to the company and once again shows that you did your research

Practice your Elevator Pitch: Video record yourself! This is really important to make sure that you look confident and speak clearly. Schedule a one-on-one appointment well before the career fair with a career counselor to review your elevator pitch. Also practice your elevator pitch with friends and see what suggestions they have.

Practice Common Interview Questions: Some employers will use the career fair to conduct on-spot interviews. Prepare for this by reviewing common interview questions. Also be prepared to talk about all of the experiences on your resume.

Print your Resume: Make sure to use resume paper when you print your resume. This paper makes a difference as it wrinkles less easily. Employers have commented on the paper I have used. Print at least two resumes for every company you plan on speaking with. You will talk to multiple people at some companies. You will also talk to some employers that you did not plan on meeting with.

During Career Fair

Get to the Career Fair Early: The career fair will be much less crowded and the lines will be shorter. This will allow you to maximize your time at the career fair.

Network: Be open to talking to employers you may not have planned on meeting with. Sometimes employers will want to talk to you based on the major on your name tag. Sometimes employers with no lines will try to start talking to you. If they do, you should meet with them. It is a great way to network, to learn more about other industries, and to practice your elevator pitch.

Talking with Employers: There is no substitute for the actual career fair. Practice cannot effectively simulate the noise and crowdedness of the event. You may be excited and want to talk to your top employer first, but this is not the best approach. Always start with an employer that is not high on your list. Once you feel entirely comfortable, go talk to the employers that interest you the most.

Give the Employer your Resume: I have found that it works best not to give your resume to a recruiter at the start of the elevator pitch. Instead, promote yourself by talking about your qualifications and get the recruiter to ask for your resume.

Get a Business Card: If you have a strong conversation with a recruiter, ask for a business card or their contact information. Not all recruiters will have business cards or be willing to give out their contact information.

Take Notes: After talking with a recruiter, write down anything memorable about the conversation. This will become important for following up after the career fair.

After Career Fair

Email Follow-Up: Send a follow-up email to any recruiter that gave you his or her contact information.

A few pieces of information to include in this email are:

1) Your elevator pitch to remind the recruiter about who you are and why you are qualified for the position

2) Something memorable about your conversation

3) Thank the employer for his or her time

4) Attach a copy of your resume

What is the Global Leadership Fellows Program?

By: Lorelle Babwah, Assistant Director of Student Services

The Global Leadership Fellows Program (GLF) is a brand new initiative within the Professional Masters Program led by Bridget Fletcher and myself, Lorelle Babwah. If you are audiovisually inclined, you can learn more about the program by watching our Harry Potter-style recruitment video found here.

GLF Program

We are pleased to announce that the program received 20 applications for our inaugural class! From that, we selected 10 excellent fellows and sorted them further into two, five-person groups: House Babenclaw (headed by yours truly) and House Fletchendore (led by Bridget Fletcher).

The goal of the program is to develop a small community of MEM and MEng students who are interested in digging a little deeper. Fellows focus their engagement in three core areas: Leadership, Personal Development, and Cultural Competence.

I’ll elaborate more on these later, but today I’d like to talk a little bit about our fellows’ current activities—knowledge sharing! In keeping with the school’s mission of “knowledge in service of society,” program fellows must demonstrate leadership through service and ongoing engagement to develop others and improve Professional Masters Programs. Each fellow must plan and execute an activity where he or she shares some knowledge with the greater community. Here are just a few examples of the fellows’ presentation topics for this semester:

Working on Diverse Teams

Singlish (Singaporean English)

Traditional Chinese Martial Arts

Women in the Workforce

Palm-Reading

Chinese Characters

Navigating Chennai

Chinese Culture and Paper Cutting

Living Through the Five Senses

Look for future updates on our fellows and the GLF Program as we progress through this exciting first year. In the meantime, please check out the Global Leadership Fellows Program blog, with special links to hear from the fellows themselves! Who knows, we may even feature some guest bloggers very soon…

Faculty Interviews with MEngagement Career Committee: Dr. Bob Barnes

Bob BarnesBy: Rajalekha Manjakuppam Rajamahendiran, MEng ’16

The MEngagment Career Committee interviews Dr. Bob Barnes, Professor of Biomedical Device Innovation and Project Management.

Dr. Barnes brings his rich experience in project management to MEM, MEng and undergraduate students in his Biomedical Device Innovation and Project Management courses here at Duke. “At Duke, we have a very unique situation, and this is one of the things that all engineers should recognize, especially MEng and MEM. If you’re in biomedical engineering (BME), you’re in arguably the number 1, number 2 BME program in the country and perhaps in the world. But it’s very rare situation in which you can walk less than a mile and be at one of the top medical schools in the world, one of the top hospitals in the country, at the number 7 nursing school in the country, at one of the top business schools in the country, one of the best law schools in the world, one of the best public policy schools in the country, and have a great economics program. If you’re interested in being an entrepreneur, those are the things you need to have, and you can walk to every one of them. There are very few places in the world, where you can do that. To come here and not take advantage of these things, doesn’t make any sense”.

The MEngagement Career Committee sat down with Dr. Barnes to get his insight and advice to students regarding industry and the job search process.

Q: What made you pursue a career in project management? How did you get into teaching courses in project management and biomedical device innovation?

A: When I was in the 6th grade, I decided I wanted a PhD. I put a plan together to get the PhD by the spring of 1974, and missed that by 6 months. After that, I taught and was up for tenure a year earlier than I had thought. I’ve always been a project manager, it’s just natural for me. During this point of time, if you take a look at NASA, take a look at things that were happening in the U.S., it was the era of project management. I came along with a right attitude at the right time. I’m a civil engineer by training, not a biomedical engineer. Through a number of opportunities that were presented, I had a chance to work with Abbott, Pfizer, Guidant, Medtronic and Eli Lilly; all of those having to do with managing new product development, as a consultant. In 2010, I made a decision, I was tired of traveling. From 1990 until 2010, I would leave home Sunday night and come back home Friday night. Decided, I didn’t want to do that as much. Just happened to meet Barry Meyers, who introduced me to George Truskey. Dr. Truskey had a grant. He needed somebody to teach a course called Biomedical Devices, and that’s how I wound up doing this.

Q: During your experience, what are the qualities, skills or traits that stand out that enable engineers to be successful? What have you seen as a project manager in your team of engineers?

A: There are 2 things that drive engineers to be successful. The first one is necessary, but not sufficient, is you must be technically proficient. It doesn’t mean you have to be an expert. The next thing you need to be a good engineer is to be able to define problems. What is sufficient is if you can’t define problems, then you will do 2 things: You will solve problems that are of no value to anyone. The second thing you will do is you will waste your life. A 30 – 40 year career. That’s all you have. I’m only going to work on those problems that are meaningful to me because if you can’t define the problems, you can’t get there. Identify: “Is this problem worth my time?”

Q: I saw part of your interview with the MEM PDC where you talked about technical proficiency. You mentioned how competency is an important trait in leaders. How does one prepare for the transition from an engineering role that requires technical proficiency to a managerial role that requires competency?

A: Well I think preparation is one issue, but the first step is desire. You have to recognize as an individual contributor you can recognize tremendous value in your life and tremendous rewards. That’s a decision as an engineer you need to make early on in your career: “Do I want to be an individual contributor?” Or “Do I want to be somebody that can leverage my skill set through others to accomplish far more that I could ever accomplish by myself?” So this becomes a very personal issue with people. It’s that “I did it” is a very different experience from “We or They did it”. I don’t get turned on by “They did it”, not even by “we did it”. It’s a mindset that’s difficult for engineers to attain. Because of the way we’re trained, and the way we’re attracted to the profession. And that’s okay because there are things that you as an individual can do that nobody else can do, and you should take pride in that. But if I can get 4 more people like you, and I can get you to work together, the five of you can accomplish things that nobody else can do. And that’s the reward you have to seek.

Q: Now shifting our discussion from career pathway to internship and job search process. What have you seen in the past work for students in terms of finding an internship or job, and what advice would you give to current students who are in the process right now?

A: There are 2 things that pop out now. Number 1 is to start early. The second thing is to ask “What contribution can I make?” not “What do I want?” I guess, the third part of this is doing your research to make sure that what you want is consistent with what the hiring organization needs. You have to start early, you have to identify a number of different opportunities, you have to do your research. If I’m the hiring organization, don’t come to me as if this is the first time you’re hearing of this organization. So do your homework, and you may discover that you may not need to talk to them as they may not be doing the work you want to do. That’s the reason you want to start early, as opposed to wait to start in the spring.

Q: For company research, you can look at the company website and attend information sessions. What are other ways to approach this?

A: Let me give you an example, there is a good group that meets at Research Triangle Park, Indus. It’s an international organization of Indians who are entrepreneurs. These are people that are entrepreneurs, that are really interested in young people, who are engineers that want to be entrepreneurs. There are different groups.

Start networking. And when you show up in your first semester, get to the know the people who are in their last semester. “Where did you work? Who did you work with?” Network through them. Because the best way to get a job with me is for somebody that has worked with me, that did well and says, “I’d like you to meet _____, would you mind if I left you her/his resume? I think she/he would do a good job for you”. There’s no better way.

Q: Since you’ve brought up entrepreneurship, some students are interested in working for a startup or even launching a start-up, but they feel the need to work for a larger corporation first. What do you suggest?

A: Most of you don’t know enough to make significant contribution to an entrepreneurial firm. Let me bring up the example of Indus again. One of the officers this past year is a former chief financial officer of RedHat. If you happen to have coffee or tea with them and they’re retired, and they discover that you’d be interested in working in software development, why shouldn’t you ask, “Who’s hiring?” SAS Institute is in the Park, Quintiles is in the Park. The story is: it’s here. Start networking, and start asking “Who can connect with me?” The best connection is with somebody who has worked there. So start with the MEng and MEM students this semester. Start now.

Q: My final question is apart from the career services on campus, what is the best resource that students can use to leverage their chances of securing their dream job or internship?

A: The real problem with dream jobs is that they don’t exist. Most of us wind up from going place to place, and we wind up at some place that fits for us. One of the things that I wish our students would do, for example, the American Society of Civil Society has a chapter, the IEEE has a chapter, BMES has a chapter, these are professional chapters not student chapters. They all meet between Greensboro, Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, they’re all in that area. If you want a job, find out about the professional societies. Find out when they meet, get a friend to go with you and go. Most of them have student fees too. The best way I know is to put yourself out there, be bold, and get to know people. Let them know when you show up in the professional engineering society of North Carolina, in the American Society of Quality etc., you’re going to be the youngest person there. So when you check in, say “I’m a student, is there someone here I can talk to just to get acquainted with the organization.” What’s the worst that can happen? They don’t talk to you at all, but at least you get to eat something. Even if you don’t meet anybody, you expand your cultural experience. You have to put yourself out there.

 

Why You Should Join the Duke MEMP Consulting Club

Consulting Club

By Madhav Shekhar: MEMP ’15

The Duke Masters of Engineering Management Consulting Club’s mission is to prepare students for successful careers in consulting after graduation. Our organization achieves this through three primary initiatives: industry sponsored projects, case interview preparation workshops, and professional seminars. Every semester the Consulting Club partners will firms within the Research Triangle and beyond to offer students an opportunity to work on real world consulting projects. These projects include anything from impact or market evaluation to supply chain strategy. The Consulting Club also offers a weekly case study practice workshop on Fridays to help prepare students for case study based interviews. The club also partners with local Duke Alumni to host seminars and workshops to educate students on careers in consulting. These events expose students to real world professional’s insight into the world of consulting.

Our most popular event of last year was the case interview preparation workshops: one co-hosted by notable Duke Alumni Daniel Kauffman and the other co-hosted by Mr. Fred Humiston. Both these individuals are McKinsey and Company alums and have been coaching people for a long time. Over 80 Master of Engineering Management Candidate students attended these three-hour events. The seminars begin with a basic overview of management consulting. It then progressed into the nuts in bolts of case interviewing. Several basic frameworks were covered and then the students were given several examples of possible case study prompts. Students were asked to present their frameworks in front of the class and feedback was given. Live cases were then performed in front of the class. Students found the event extremely informative. As a result, the Consulting Club has begun to reach out to other MEMP Alumni in the area who may be interested in hosting a similar event in the future.

The consulting club then builds on these workshops and organizes weekly case preparation workshops to help students hone their case interviewing skills. We also organize mock case interview competitions to give students a chance to practice their interview skills. Simulating a real-time consulting interview, students face challenging case interviews and behavioral interviews in the process to completely practice what they have learned so far. Given the job and internship search that goes on the entire year, we have found these workshops and interviews to be highly beneficial to the students.

We also facilitate real-time consulting engagements lasting 6-8 weeks with clients in and around the area, which help students get the hang of the consulting industry. Students form teams of 4-5 people coordinated by a member of the consulting club and try to solve the business problems of the clients, which can range from market entry to forming strategies for market expansion. We have had a history of delivering quality and timely results and hence, the companies are always eager to have the Duke MEMP Consulting Club do pro-bono consulting for them.

Finally, we collaborate with other consulting clubs in Duke to form a community dedicated to help students prepare for a career in consulting. It gives us immense pleasure in being able to help the Duke community and in the process, help ourselves get better in whatever we do.

To find out more visit our website: Duke MEMP Consulting Club

Duke MEM Loves our Blue Devils Basketball

MEM Duke Basketball_1MEM Duke Basketball_2

By Sasha Doust (MEMP ’15)

The Duke Master of Engineering Management program has been thoroughly engrossed in campus life this year, and along with that, longstanding Duke basketball traditions. Excited to be part of the action, MEMers set up tents for a weekend at Duke’s Basketball Campout in the fall to have a chance to win season tickets to the basketball games. Those of us (including myself) who did not win tickets, have still managed to find ways to make it to Cameron Indoor to see our Blue Devils play. This has been an exhilarating year, as we have had many great wins and have watched our highly regarded basketball coach, Mike Krzyzewski (aka Coach K) reach a career high of 1,000 wins.

MEM Duke Basketball_3MEM Duke Basketball_4

We have enjoyed cheering on our boys to amazing home-game wins against teams including Notre Dame, Syracuse, and of course, our in-state rival UNC. We have had other opportunities to see the team in action as well and hear the players speak, such as at our Countdown to Craziness event and a talk given by Coach K in Cameron. Some of us have even spotted the basketball players around campus and Durham!

We have had fun tailgating, cheering on the team at Cameron, and attending watch parties for away games. We are looking forward to the continued excitement in the NCAA Tournament. Duke MEMers are proud to be able to share in the rich tradition and legacy of Duke basketball!

CDAR MEM Student Group – Achievements & Final words

By Naman Garg , MEM ’13 – CDAR Director Fall 13

Naman Garg, MEM '13
Naman Garg, MEM ’13

It is my immense pleasure and honor to write final words for activities performed by extremely talented and hardworking Career Development & Alumni Relations (CDAR) members during Fall 2013. We have worked on some amazing projects such as Internship Information sessions, Informational Interviewing, Workgroups, and the CDAR Fall 2013 Installment document. I am very hopeful that in Spring ‘14 CDAR will do more wonderful work under Osama’s leadership and Jenny Johnson and Ross Wade’s guidance.

When I joined Duke MEM program in Fall 2013, I was overwhelmed with the options and choices presented to me. Being an engineer with limited work experience, I had little idea of the professional path I wanted to follow. So I set on a quest to understand my career interests. I started by talking to a lot of people from diverse fields. This helped me to realize what I didn’t want to do in the future. Eventually I was able to figure out about my career interests.

I also learned that I was not alone in this struggle of choosing a career path. So, when I got the opportunity to work as CDAR’s director, I oversaw a highly motivated team that worked on projects aimed at helping MEM students make effective career choices. Informational Interviewing is one such project which will help students to know about day to day activities of various alumni working in diverse fields. We believe that it will definitely help students make  informed choices with respect to their careers.

Internship Information sessions, lunch with professors also registered highly positive feedback from students. All the transcripts of alumni interviews, internship information sessions, and feedback from other projects have been documented in the CDAR Fall 2013 Installment.

I am sure CDAR will have much more exciting and wonderful projects for MEM students this semester. I highly recommend students to go through the CDAR Fall 2013 Installment to learn about different projects and their outcomes. We believe this will definitely help students in their Jobs/Internship search.

Finally I would like to thank Margaret, Osama, Vaishnavi, Arjun, Ajay, Samkit, Anthony, Pranav, Swathy, Zihe, Tucker, & Kavitha for their excellent work. Jenny, Ross and Bridget for their valuable guidance and Maahir & Venos for constant support.

It was a great learning experience for me personally. I would like to welcome the future team and hope they will have as much fun and wonderful experiences from this forum.

Click here to read the CDAR report including informational interviews with alumni, discussions with MEM faculty, and more!

DUHatch: Don’t Wait – INNOVATE!

By: Aditya Murthy – MEng, ’14

Duke University has always been strongly committed to innovation and entrepreneurship. Being located in the Research Triangle area, there is no paucity of bright minds and path breaking ideas. All it needs is a resource to nurture these ideas and help them flourish. DUHatch is this resource.

DUHatch
DUHatch

Available to all Duke Students, our business incubator can do a lot more than providing you with a wonderful office space that you can run your idea from. It connects enterprising students having viable, innovative business ideas, with mentors from faculty and industry. It is an opportunity to give your new venture a launching platform.

Professor Jim Mundell, the Director of DUHatch, is a seasoned industry expert with executive level business experience in the medical device, semiconductor, thermoelectric, and electronic systems markets.  He most recently held the position of COO and Co-Founder at Nextreme Thermal Solutions, where he raised over $30M in venture and strategic partner funding before selling the company.  Professor Mundell has also held key executive positions at three other successful early stage companies such as Volumetrics Medical Imaging, Trivirix International, and CBA.  During Professor Mundell’s first 18 years he held senior executive positions with General Electric, Harris, SCI Systems, and CTS.  Professor Mundell has worked internationally in Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Japan and Ireland. He holds an MBA from Purdue University’s Krannert Graduate School of Management and a BS in EET from Purdue University. Professor Mundell possesses a wealth of industry expertise and is a great person to talk to as your idea evolves from its nascent stages into a revenue generating business model.  He also teaches two business related courses in the MENG and MEM programs.

Along with our in-house expert, we can also put you in direct contact with experts from all areas of a business including legal, finance, accounting, marketing, sales, engineering, and manufacturing.  We call this our ‘Coaches-On-Call’ service.  At the start of every semester, we make a list of these experts available to all our teams. These are people with decades of experience behind them. They are willing to provide assistance with issues ranging from raising capital, intellectual property, and incorporating your company to general business and marketing strategy.  When a company is in its formative stages, money is invariably a major consideration. The opportunity to have an office space, lawyers willing to help you on a pro-bono basis, and experienced mentors to turn to for advice is invaluable.

A huge part of the success of any business is the ability to raise initial capital. To this effect, DUHatch presents the registered businesses with the unique opportunity to pitch their idea directly to potential angel investors and venture capitalist. The experience of standing in front of these investors is a huge reality check for many. It helps teams reassess their position and make the relevant modifications to their business plan in order to be able to deliver a stronger pitch the next time. At the same time, if your pitch manages to catch the guest angel or VC’s attention, you may have just found your seed funding!

DUHatch is also involved in the Summer Innovation Program. This program provides undergraduate and graduate students with the opportunity to receive hands-on exposure to entrepreneurship, business, and emerging technologies. It is an opportunity for teams to propel their existing start-ups into the next stage of operation. At the end of the Spring semester, a panel of judges is brought to pick one out of the various business ideas. This team is then given a stipend of $5000 to work on their idea over the course of the Summer break. Teams outside the center are also eligible and encouraged to participate, allowing for a wider range of ideas.

One of Duke’s biggest entrepreneur-centric events is the Duke Startup Challenge. Before the deadline of the 1st round, DUHatch conducts a critiquing session with Professor Mundell and a guest expert. This fall we were lucky to have Poornima Vijayashanker, also a serial entrepreneur, Professor at Duke, and founder/co-founder of BizeeBee, Femgineer, and Mint.com work with Professor Mundell. She was terrific.  This was a chance for teams to receive some validation as well as constructive criticism on their application before submitting it to the start-up challenge!

However, our biggest assets are the teams that are affiliated with the center. The myriad of bright ideas are what fuels the center. We house ideas related to Biomaterials, Hydraulic Fracking, E-Recycling, and Sports Apps to name a few. We currently have 7 participating teams: BioArt, Foam Finger, Refract, Deos LLC., Luxano Biomedical, Runner Over and Smart Metals. All these ideas have the potential to be ‘the next big thing’. We at DUHatch hope to help them realize their potential.

My role as the Student Manager of DUHatch entails communicating with the teams as well as our mentors. I work closely with the teams to understand what resources they will require and make them available to them. This includes providing them with contacts that might help them with a particular problem or scheduling a meeting with one of our coaches or Professor Mundell. My immediate goal, however, is to increase DUHatch’s visibility in the social media space. A future goal is to build University Relations with incubation centers in Silicon Valley, providing our teams with a route to bigger opportunities. This position is going to be an incredible learning curve for me and I intend to make the most of it!