Third Space Lab – Guest Speaker Series – Michael Byram – Why intercultural (critical) competence in languaculture teaching?


Dear all,

You are cordially invited to the guest lecture of the Third Space Lab by Professor Emeritus Michael Byram (Durham University, UK). We hope you will join us!
Please RSVP here: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_41OmjcdHRmWRALs 

Date: April 30th, 2021

Time: 7 pm (China time) / 7 am (EST) / 12 pm (UK time)

Zoom Meeting ID:  985 9099 3775

Why intercultural (critical) competence in languaculture teaching?

I will begin with a personal answer to my title question, and describe my professional journey from studying languages to teaching and researching intercultural citizenship in language teaching, and across the curriculum.

I will then argue for the educational values of teaching for intercultural communicative competence and intercultural citizenship, using both an example and an educational perspective. The example will demonstrate that language teaching and intercultural competence teaching are inter-related and mutually supportive: language learning is improved by teaching for intercultural citizenship.

My position has however implications for teachers which cannot be ignored. There are ethical issues to consider and challenges to professional identities, and I will raise these for discussion.

Bionote

Michael Byram is Professor Emeritus at Durham University (UK) and Research Professor at Sofia University, Bulgaria. He studied Modern and Medieval Languages at King’s College, Cambridge, including a PhD in Danish literature, and then taught French and German in secondary and adult education. He then moved to Durham University, where he was involved in teacher training and research on languages and education. His books include Minority Education and Ethnic Survival (1986) and Teaching and Assessing Intercultural Communicative Competence – Revisited (2021). He was Adviser to the Council of Europe Language Policy Division and a member of the working group which produced the Council of Europe’s Reference Framework of Competences for Democratic Culture.

To think about in advance:

When people ask me “What do the English think about…. (e.g. global warming or capital punishment or Donald Trump etc etc.)”, they think that, because I am English, I can tell them. Yet I hesitate and try to avoid answering. If they ask me if ‘he goed to London yesterday’ is correct, because I am English, I don’t hesitate; I know the answer. Is it possible to know about ‘English culture’ – or any other? Instead of ‘English’ put your own word and ask yourself how you would answer.

How important is it to teach/learn knowledge? Which knowledge?  How important to teach/learn skills? Which skills? How important to teach/learn attitudes? Which attitudes?

To watch in advance:

Third Space Lab – Guest Speaker Series – Adrian Holliday on Third Space Methodology

Dear all,

You are cordially invited to the guest lecture of the Third Space Lab by Dr. Adrian Holliday (Canterbury Christ Church University). We hope you will join us!
Please RSVP here: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_dbs44bUulnr63NY

Date: April 9th, 2021

Time: 5 pm (China time)/5 am (EST)/10 am (UK time)

Zoom Meeting ID: 936 1008 0413

Third-space methodology: Finding deCentred threads in small culture formation on the go

The biggest barrier to intercultural travel is its framing as between large, national or civilisational ‘cultures’. This framing falsely claims, for example, that (a) Western and Eastern people are essentially different to each other because their behaviour and values are determined by these separate large ‘cultures’, and that (b) learning a second language requires the native-speakerist activity of learning a second large ‘culture’. This large-culture approach originates from a racist, structural-function­al­­ist, Orientalist, Centre, Western grand narrative that falsely separates the world into superior individualist and inferior collectivist ‘cultures’. It therefore creates essentialist blocks that pull us apart.
Intercultural travel instead requires deCentred threads. This is not learning the ‘other culture’. Although we are brought up differently in our national systems, with different histories, practices and architectures, we share everyday, common, hybrid, underlying, intercultural experience ‘on the go’ such as going to school for the first time, visiting friends’ families, and joining new work and leisure groups. This existing underlying intercultural competence needs to be recalled as the best resource for engaging with more distant intercultural realities. However, ‘us’-‘them’ prejudice is everywhere and makes us vulnerable to blocking large-culture grand narratives. Third-space methodology is the hard and uncomfortable, intersubjective work of rooting out and putting aside prejudice in a new, deCentred, decolonising, thinking-as-usual. We can then see culture as creative, flowing, changing, hybrid, boundary dissolving and figurative, rather than confining and separating.

About the speaker

Adrian Holliday is a professor of applied linguistics and intercultural education at Canterbury Christ Church University. After completing his Bachelor’s in sociology in 1971 and beginning his career as a teacher of English, History, Economics and Sociology in London, he embarked on a six-year international experience as an English teacher and then English program manager in Iran, from 1973 to 1979. After returning to the UK and completing a masters degree at Lancaster University, from 1980-1985, he was involved in setting up the English for Special Purposes Centre at Damascus University in Syria. This is now the successful Higher Languages Institute. Then, in 1985-1990, Professor Holliday was involved in a national university curriculum project in Egypt which comprised 18 universities across the country. The experiences during this project provided him material for his Ph.D. at Lancaster University, which he received in 1990. He headed the Graduate School at Canterbury Christ Church University from 2002-2017, providing academic management for research degrees, and was a program director for the Ph.D.s in Applied Linguistics and in Education. He also chaired the  British Association of TESOL Qualifying Institutions and helped set up the British Institute of English Language Teaching. Throughout his career, he has been developing his thinking and writing around the relationship between the individual, culture and social structures. His long-standing relationship with Iran and the Middle East has provided him with an awareness of the global politics which surround these relationships.

This event will be recorded and posted on the Third Space Lab’s Sakai site for all to view.

Freedom Lab Event Report on “The Utopianism called Decolonization: Thinking with Tagore”

By Yue Qiu

Class of 2022

On June 11, 2020, The Freedom Lab invited Professor Sandeep Banerjee from McGill University to lead a discussion on “The Utopianism called Decolonization: Thinking with Tagore“. The Freedom Lab co-directors, Professors Jesse Olsavsky and Selina Lai-Henderson hosted the lecture. Professor Titas Chakraborty and around 20 students attended the conference.

Professor Chakraborty introduced the guest speaker. Professor Banerjee is a literary theorist, cultural critic, and historian who studies the literatures and histories of decolonization, particularly in India. Besides writing on colonialism and liberation, he also writes on a wide range of topics such as travel narrative and photography. He published the book Utopia and Indian Decolonization: Literary Pre-figurations of the Postcolony last year. Continue reading “Freedom Lab Event Report on “The Utopianism called Decolonization: Thinking with Tagore””

Report on Interdisciplinarity and the Future of Life

By Anisha Joshi

Class of 2022

In the fourth installment in the Interdisciplinarity series, Professor Ed Turner from Princeton University discussed astrobiology and interdisciplinarity in science. As an astrophysicist who has published a plethora of papers that also discuss astrobiology, in this conversation Professor Turner discussed the implications the interdisciplinary field of astrobiology has on life on earth, as well as what it means for society and culture.

From Galileo theorizing that the moon might have life on it to the boom of science fiction in the 50s that aroused public interest in astrobiology, Professor Turner stated it has had a long and interesting history. With his sustained interest in big questions, some of which gain their impetus from the more fundamental questions of humanity and existence, Professor Turner was lured into the area of astrobiology after participating in a 2000 NASA study of exoplanets. Finding himself with an increasing interest in exoplanets rather than just cosmology, he ventured into the highly interdisciplinary area of astrobiology. Continue reading “Report on Interdisciplinarity and the Future of Life”

Report on Interdisciplinarity and the Future of Knowledge

By Sinan Farooqui

Class of 2022

Interdisciplinarity lies at the heart of Duke Kunshan University’s innovative curriculum for the 21st century. Building on the work of the Humanities Research Center in Planetary Ethics and Artificial Intelligence (PETAL) and Digital Humanities, the HumanSpace+ Research Group, investigates the goals, values and practices of interdisciplinary integration in the production of knowledge. Thereby, Duke Kunshan University through Professor James Miller (Associate Dean of Interdisciplinary Strategy) and the HumanSpace+ Research Group held a series of conversations with leading theorists and practitioners of interdisciplinarity in the world today to explore how interdisciplinarity is tied to innovation and future of knowledge. Continue reading “Report on Interdisciplinarity and the Future of Knowledge”

Interdisciplinarity and the Future of Life

Thursday 7 May, 10pm Eastern / Friday 8 May, 10am China

Interdisciplinarity lies at the heart of Duke Kunshan University’s innovative curriculum for the 21st century. Recently DKU appointed James Miller, Co-Director of the Humanities Research Center to be its first Associate Dean of Interdisciplinary Strategy. Join Professor Miller and students from the HumanSpace+ research group as they embark on a series of conversations with leading theorists and practitioners of interdisciplinarity in the world today to explore how interdisciplinarity is tied to innovation and future of knowledge.

Ed Turner

The fourth conversation in this series is with Professor Ed Turner from Princeton University and focuses on the future of the life. Working extensively in both theoretical and observational astrophysics, Professor Turner has published more than 240 research papers with particular concentrations on topics including binary galaxies, dark matter, quasars, exoplanets, astrobiology and the origin of life.  Professor Turner is also a leader of the Breakthrough Starshot initative, which aims to develop a light-powered starship to journey to Proxima Centauri b, an exoplanet discovered in August 2016.

Continue reading “Interdisciplinarity and the Future of Life”

Interdisciplinarity and the Future of the Planet

Thursday 30 April, 9am Eastern / 9pm China
Zoom: 695-290-0771

Interdisciplinarity lies at the heart of Duke Kunshan University’s innovative curriculum for the 21st century. Recently DKU appointed James Miller, Co-Director of the Humanities Research Center to be its first Associate Dean of Interdisciplinary Strategy. Join Professor Miller and students from the HumanSpace+ research group as they embark on a series of conversations with leading theorists and practitioners of interdisciplinarity in the world today to explore how interdisciplinarity is tied to innovation and future of knowledge.

Thomas Bruhn

The third conversation in this series is with Dr Thomas Bruhn from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) at Potsdam University. Dr  Bruhn is a physicist who has been working transdisciplinarily at the IASS since 2012. His research initially focused on climate engineering and CO2 utilisation. In 2016 he began to co-lead the AMA (A Mindset for the Anthropocene) project together with Dr Zoe Lüthi on the question how the cultivation of mental qualities like mindfulness and compassion can contribute to sustainability. He has also been engaged in research on collective learning and co-creation in the context of political decision-making for sustainability since 2017. Dr Bruhn’s  ambition is to bring together a variety of stakeholders in reflexive processes that allow for the emergence of truly shared perspectives and action pathways for a context-specific implementation of specific sustainability targets.

Continue reading “Interdisciplinarity and the Future of the Planet”

Interdisciplinarity and the Future of the Mind

Thursday 23 April, 10pm Eastern / Friday 24 April, 10am China
Zoom: 695-290-0771

Interdisciplinarity lies at the heart of Duke Kunshan University’s innovative curriculum for the 21st century. Recently DKU appointed James Miller, Co-Director of the Humanities Research Center to be its first Associate Dean of Interdisciplinary Strategy. Join Professor Miller and students from the HumanSpace+ research group as they embark on a series of conversations with leading theorists and practitioners of interdisciplinarity in the world today to explore how interdisciplinarity is tied to innovation and future of knowledge.

Evan Thompson

The second conversation in this series is with Professor Evan Thompson from the University of British Columbia and focuses on the future of the mind. Evan Thompson is a writer and professor of philosophy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. He works on the nature of the mind, the self, and human experience. His work combines cognitive science, philosophy of mind, phenomenology, and cross-cultural philosophy, especially Asian philosophical traditions. He is the author of Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy (Columbia University Press, 2015); Mind in Life: Biology, Phenomenology, and the Sciences of Mind (Harvard University Press, 2007); and Colour Vision: A Study in Cognitive Science and the Philosophy of Perception (Routledge Press, 1995). He is the co-author, with Francisco J. Varela and Eleanor Rosch, of The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience (MIT Press, 1991, revised edition 2016). Evan is an Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

Continue reading “Interdisciplinarity and the Future of the Mind”

The Media Art Speaker Series | BioArt and Pan BioArt – With Exhibition Quasi-Nature as Case Study

Friday April 17
9pm China Time/ 9am EST

Zoom Meeting ID: 873-243-562

The second Zoom lecture of bi-weekly Media Art Speaker Series is scheduled on Friday April 17th, 2020 at 9am (US Eastern) / 9pm (China Central) and features Beijing-based curator and researcher Jo Wei. This series is organized and hosted by Prof. Benjamin Bacon and Prof. Vivian Xu, and supported by the Division of Arts and Humanities and the Humanities Research Center at Duke Kunshan University.

This event is open to the public.

媒体艺术系列讲座第二场定于2020年4月17日中国时间晚上9点(美国东部时间早上9点)。这次请到的是策展人、研究者魏颖。媒体艺术系列讲座由Benjamin Bacon教授和Vivian Xu教授策划组织,并由昆山杜克大学艺术与人文学科提供支持,每两周一次在Zoom线上开讲。

活动面向公众开放。

Continue reading “The Media Art Speaker Series | BioArt and Pan BioArt – With Exhibition Quasi-Nature as Case Study”