[Participants Needed] An Online Experiment: Can you accurately recognize pain from others’ facial expression?

Interested in participating in a fun and easy cognitive psychology experiment? Join us!

This survey aims to know whether racial differences can affect the recognition of pain evaluation through facial expressions. Healthy individuals who are age 18 above, first language is Chinese are all welcome! You will be receiving compensation after you finished!

Check the flyer for more information. Feel free to participate by scanning the QR code!

July 19 MediHealth Podcast LIVE | A Sweet Spot at Work

MediHealth Podcast is hosting its first live interview session this July-themed “A Sweet Spot at Work”. Many employer-employee relationships end in disillusionment, discontent, and disengagement.

Is there something amiss about our employer selection process, and how can we make better strategic career choices that deliver more meaning, fire our passion, and direct us to be the best versions of ourselves? Get more insight at MediHealth Podcast’s first live session!

We would be discussing making strategic career choices with Anthea Kiu, an Access and Policy Lead and Patient Partnership Centre of Excellence Lead at Roche. Interviewers Reika Shimomura and Sue Meng Chan would be hosting the virtual live session on the 19th of July at 9 PM CST (9 AM EST). There would be opportunities to ask live questions from you and discuss key issues with our hosts.

You can RSVP here by entering your NetID and receive a calendar request or scan the QR code to the survey link: https://duke.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_07CTQliraCRbo5U

BIO

Anthea Kiu was formerly Breast Cancer Foundation’s General Manager before pursuing her Master of Business Administration, having been privileged to receive a scholarship from the Queen Mary University of London. She has 15 years’ experience in strategic marketing and management, with strong Private-Public-People partnerships established for non-profit organisations and consumer brands.

Driven by the purpose to empower cancer patients in living full lives, Anthea joined Roche with the aim to accelerate their access to innovative and superior treatment options and advocate for a patient-centric healthcare system where patients’ voices define which outcomes matter the most to them in healthcare policies. Outside of work, she enjoys reading, hiking, travelling, pilates and cuddling with her dog.

Announcing the Winners of the Freedom Lab Essay and Creative Writing Competition (Spring 2021)

Freedom Lab is excited to announce the results of the Essay and Creative Writing Competition (Spring 2021):

Essay Writing
1. “The Queer Movement in Palestine” by Anisha Joshi
2. “#Hashtag Activism and its impact on the BLM Movement as a Counternarrative Tool” by Rachel Darius
3. “Modern Indian Economy and Inequality” by Yue Qiu

Creative Writing
1. “The Wok” by Hua Chai
2. “Jiatang” by Xiaomeng Yan
3. “My Skin” by Haley Williams

All the entries have gone through a rigorous review process. Thanks are due for Professor Stephanie Anderson and Professor Caio Yurgel who were the honorary judges for the creative writing category.

Congratulations to all of the winners!

Freedom Lab Essay / Creative Writing Competition

To celebrate the end of an incredibly challenging, and nonetheless fruitful, academic year, the Freedom Lab is inviting DKU students to submit essays or creative writing pieces for consideration of various prizes with topics related to the themes of the Lab (more information about the lab and its research themes can be found here https://sites.duke.edu/dkuhumanities/projects/freedom-lab/).

Topics could range from the recent conversations on Covid-19/Black Lives Matter/Anti-Asian Hate, the legacies of slavery and imperialism, Afro-Asian engagements in the age of Cold War, feminist voices, the histories of women suffrage, labor and migration, environmental history and settler colonialism, to any other forms of inequality that have continued to inform and shape our human experience.

Students are invited to submit writing pieces of a maximum length of 5000 words to Chi Zhang (chi.zhang323@dukekunshan.edu.cn) by May 25. There will be two competition categories: essays and creative writing. Essays can take a variety of forms; they can be papers from classes or based on signature work projects. Creative writing pieces can be poems, personal reflections, short stories, or a mix of multiple forms.

Three essays and three creative writing pieces will be selected for a first prize of 500 RMB, a second prize of 450RMB, and a bronze prize of 400 RMB respectively.

Results will be announced by the end of May.

Journey of the Universe: Science, Philosophy, Cosmology

Tuesday April 27, 5:30PM China

CC 1095 / Zoom (Passcode: JOTU123)

Refreshments will be provided. RSVP here!

Dear DKU community,

You are all cordially invited to attend the presentations of student researchers of the PETAL Journey of the Universe Project.  Below is a brief introduction of all the projects.

Student Projects:

Kunshan Sound Map (Dongchen Zhu)

Abstract

For city dwellers, it might be easier to answer the question “what does a city look like?” than “what does a city sound like?”. A place can remain static during a period of time; but sound—with a location, is dynamic. This project is to collect sound in Kunshan and locate them in the city map using GPS, trying to provide a way of answering the question mentioned above, though limitations inevitably exist. By engaging in the project, the participant is able to mark her trajectories in the city. Moreover, the participant with a recorder becomes a cursor on the map showing sonic information in certain location. This can also provide a perspective to the exploration of the journey of the universe from Kunshan in contemporary context.

The Scientific God and the God of Science: The Parallel Beauty of Life Sciences and Indian Philosophy (Yixuan Wu, Reiheng Xu & Trailokya Raj Bajgain)

Abstract

What is the origin of life? What are the extremes in which life can survive? How does life evolve? These are the fundamental questions in astrobiology, but also essential to religious worldviews. In this project, we go through the scientific theories explaining these problems, including the chance theory, the chemical revolution theory, Darwinism, Anthropocentrism, and others, to compare them with the religious worldviews of Jainism and Hinduism. We aim to discover the potential connections and mutual influences between science and religion equipped with interdisciplinary research methods.

The Path We have Gone Through: An Understanding of the Universe in Ancient China (Sihan Wang & Yinan Zhao)

Abstract

Ancient Chinese has devoted great wisdom to exploring the origin of the universe. They have developed rich ideas concerning the generation and evolution of the universe, and the relationship between heaven and human. Based on such a wealth of astronomical knowledge,we will present the intertwined relationship between Yin-Yang, Qi, Five elements, and Qiyao.Using citations of Huainanzi, Lingxian, and Huangdi Neijing, we are trying to show how these terms have their origins from the observations of planet movement in the universe, how they subtly resonance with contemporary scientific cosmogenesis, and how they affect the Chinese philosophy and cosmology beliefs.

Parallels between Buddhist Cosmology and Modern Science: Two Sides of the Same Coin? (Jiayang Ling & Yuan Li)

Abstract

There seem to be strong parallels between the Buddhists and scientific way of perceiving and understanding the reality. Surprisingly, Buddha’s descriptions of the universe resonate harmoniously with modern scientific discoveries in physics, psychology, and new concepts that went ubiquitous in the past decades. In this presentation, we would like to unveil the connections between Buddhist cosmology, quantum theories, and modern society. We will firstly explain Buddhist tenets and concepts related to cosmology, including fundamental emptiness, interconnectedness and Indrajala, and then relate them to the parallel ideas from scientific findings, including the wave-particle duality and quantum theories. Since both science and Buddhism bear fundamental assumptions that determine their standpoint, logic and approach to explain the world, there remain discrepancies between their perceptions of reality and the reality itself. The core value we want to convey is that the two seemingly opposite ways, one intuitive and spiritual, the other rational and scientific, are essentially two means of exploring the same reality.

The Evolution of Chinese Ecological Civilization: From Past to Future (Yutong Lu, Yin-Chu Lu & Xiaoliang Yang)

Abstract

The project will ideally focus on analyzing Chinese recent eye-catching ecological civilization and the evolution of this idea from two main perspectives, which are ideally philosophical and political.

First Section (Ancient Chinese Philosophical Tradition and Its Comparison with Current Policies) :

Ecological civilization (EC) is a response to the increasingly serious environmental issues and a brand new “civilization ” aiming to figure out a sustainable way for economic development and achieve the harmonious and holistic balance between human society and nature. EC was first explicitly proposed and then widely spread by President Jintao Hu at the 17th National Congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC) in 2007. Next, EC was included into the overall plan for China socialism development and was endorsed in the constitution of the CPC in 2012. However, the divine thoughts of sustainability and
achieving harmony between human beings and nature reflected from EC were shining brightly in Chinese traditional philosophy schools. For Confucianism, the proponents mainly support the idea of Harmony between human beings and nature(天人合一, Tian Ren He Yi), and benevolent people love their all creatures (仁民爱物, Ren Min Ai Wu). For Daoism, the proponents mainly argue that the Way is cultivated by nature (道法自然, Dao Fa Ziran), and all things are combined as one (万物合一, Wanwu He Yi). What are the differences between traditional Chinese philosophy’s interpretation of the relationship between human beings and nature and current Chinese domestic and foreign policies by virtue of ecological civilization? This section argues that the EC in traditional Chinese philosophy services for the stability of ancient Chinese states and policies, while current Chinese government and policies service for the development of EC in China and all around the world.

Second Section (Analyzing the Cause of “Ecological Civilization” to both External and Internal Factors)

The section is primarily designed to analyze the causes of Chinese recent adovaction and approach in environmental protection. Before 2006, China was largely criticized especially by the developed countries for its intense pursuit of economic benefit at the cost of the environment. However, after the year China has dramatically changed its image in this aspect and been widely praised by its building on renewable energy as well as sustainable development approach, especially after Xi Jinping came to power when new actors in environmental regulation emerged. This section suggests such a transformation is due to both external and internal factors. While being an environmental protector would largely improve Chinese international image fitting into Chinese ambition on enhancing international status, coming with rising economic power, the policy of environmental harmony can also serve as a moral weapon against its international competitor, particularly the US which showed a declining interest in environmental protection in recent years. Also, the transformation is also a result of efforts from the bottom, as independent journalists and other non-governmental actors bravely and continually reported drawbacks in Chinese environmental regulations, raising people’s awareness in this aspect and then pushing the government to reconsider the policies.

After The Myth of the Liberator: Slavery and Places of Memory in the French Petits Antilles

Venue: IB 1010 / Zoom: 261 330 4845 

Time & Date: Friday April 30th,  6-7:30 PM China

Speaker: Yun Kyoung KWON, yunkwon@snu.ac.kr 

Yun Kyoung KWON (PhD, University of Chicago) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Western History at Seoul National University, South Korea. Her research focuses on the histories of the French and Haitian Revolutions, slavery and abolition in the French Empire, as well as postcolonialism and the politics of memory. Her work has appeared in such journals as Social History and Atlantic Studies, as well as such edited volumes as France’s Lost Empires and Abolitionist Places.

Today, when the extreme right’s racism and anti-racist struggles are simultaneously intensifying, the memory of slavery is a subject of sharp debate around the world. France had long suppressed this memory to maintain its national identity as the “Republic of liberation.” Now that the repressed memory of slavery has returned at the head of the French “war of memories” (guerre de mémoires), I would like to think about how the descendants of slavery and colonialism now living as French citizens are processing this painful memory. Based on my research trip in 2020, this presentation overviews the landscape of memory on the two islands of the French West Indies, Martinique and Guadeloupe. It analyzes the various mnemonic strategies found in the places of slavery memory and examines how new monuments have challenged the dominant national discourse of ‘liberty granted by France’ and the myth of ‘Schoelcher, the Liberator.’

‘Drawing and Erasing’: The Art of the Comic with Sonny Liew

9pm China time, Thursday April 22

Zoom ID: 987 7209 8000

Join us for a talk by award-winning and internationally acclaimed artist Sonny Liew, on the underlying language of comics —from composition to text-image interaction and the representation of time— as well as his personal journey and career choices as a comics creator.

Optional: Interested in creating your own comic, and receiving feedback from master of the medium Sonny Liew himself? No prior experience required. Select one of the attached prompts to respond to, and email your comic to alice.xiang@duke.edu by 3pm (China time) on Thursday April 22nd.

Sonny Liew – comic prompt 1

Sonny Liew – comic prompt 2

Sonny Liew – comic prompt 3

BIO

Sonny Liew’s multi-Eisner winning The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye was a New York Times and Amazon bestseller, and the first graphic novel to win the Singapore Literature Prize. Other works include The Shadow Hero (with Gene Luen Yang), Doctor Fate (with Paul Levitz) and Malinky Robot, as well as titles for Marvel Comics, DC Comics, DC Vertigo, Boom Studios and Disney Press.

HHL Luncheon & Project Sharing

Location: Water Pavilion

Zoom ID: 530.394.0458

Time: 11:45 am-12:45pm, April 1st, Thursday  China Time

The Health Humanities Lab luncheon is a status update on all of the current projects sponsored by the HHL. Each team will present their work and it will be recorded over Zoom so that other groups interested in the new call for proposals will have the opportunity to learn from the examples of successful project proposals.

HHL Exhibition: Public Square 2.0

Location: AB Lobby

Zoom ID: 865 588 9767

Time: 10am-8pm (with a special event at 11:30am) – April 1st – China Time

Public Square 2.0 is a video-based multi-screen installation about people’s interactions within public space, as a reflection of people’s relationships within a community in Beijing in the COVID-19 context. The videos screened within are documentations of human interactions in a community in Beijing during the COVID-19 outbreak from March to August in 2020. Each video highlights different parts of a communal square, documenting individuals and their daily activities within it at different times.

When it comes to the DKU community, for students, staff and faculty abroad, most of them are still unable to return to campus due to the pandemic. The installation is located in the AB lobby and with a MaxHub whiteboard that allows for real-time interactions through Zoom to connect the entire DKU community during the ongoing pandemic.

The pandemic has affected people’s lives all around the world. Even now, people’s outdoor activities are more or less restricted. And for some, the access to face-to-face interactions is still difficult. Within this context, this project wants to explore how we can increase interactions and strengthen bonds in the DKU community. What roles can communal space play in this process? How can we, as a community, support each other, and tell each other that we will face the challenges together?

For people online, you are greatly welcomed to join the exhibition virtually. Please feel free to interact with people on campus and annotate on the virtual whiteboard to share your feelings and thoughts.

Confronting Anti-Asian Hate: Gendered, Racialized, and Transnational Perspectives

IB 1047 / Zoom: 451 154 2347

Thursday April 1, 11:00 AM – 13:00 PM China

Guest Speakers:

Lunch will be provided

Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Contemporary China and the Freedom Lab

In the past year, members of Asian descent have been the targets of hate crimes and other forms of systemic violence. These acts, particularly those that have taken place across the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and Europe, have, for the most part, singled out the most vulnerable members of Asian communities, including the elderly, the working-class, and women. Most recently, the mass murders of 8 people in Atlanta, Georgia on March 16, 2021, six of whom are Asian women laboring in the massage parlor industry, have ignited a wave of social movements calling for the end of intersectional racism, misogyny, and discrimination against those who are engaged in sex work, along those who labor in beauty, nail, and massage parlors. What is the significance of this event, particularly for those in the Asian-American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community in the U.S.? What debates around race, gender, and labor have proliferated around the U.S. and the world since the shootings? How can the histories and experiences of migration, labor, and activism among Asian immigrants and their allies cast new light on building cross-cultural ties between Asia, China, and their diasporic groups in the Global South (Africa, Southeast Asia, Latin America)? Continue reading “Confronting Anti-Asian Hate: Gendered, Racialized, and Transnational Perspectives”