Freedom Lab: Launch Event

Date: February 6 (Thursday)
Venue: AB 2107
Time: 5:30-7pm

Mark your calendar! On Feb 6, the Freedom Lab will have a launch event, and you will learn about the core concept of the Lab, research of faculty affiliated to the Lab, and resources available to students who are interested in exploring research and independent studies with faculty related to the main themes of freedom/unfreedom. Continue reading “Freedom Lab: Launch Event”

Religious Texts in the Anthropocene: A Conversation on Interdisciplinary Integration

On Friday January 10, the Humanities Research Center welcomes Professor Mark Larrimore from the New School, New York City to give a presentation on Religious Texts in the Anthropocene and to enter into a conversation with HRC Co-Director James Miller.

IB1046: Friday 10 January, 2-3pm

Professor Larrimore is Associate Professor of Religion at the New School, and author of two important books about contemporary religion and politics. Continue reading “Religious Texts in the Anthropocene: A Conversation on Interdisciplinary Integration”

Africa: Migration, Culture, Conflict

The Humanities Research Center at Duke Kunshan University is pleased to announce a three day event Africa: Migration, Culture & Conflict featuring three keynote scholars:

  • Fati Abubakar Gangaran, Duke University
  • Shamil Jeppie, University of Cape Town
  • Charles Piot, Duke University.

Wednesday 15 January, 7-9pm

Opening Reception and Photography Exhibition, “Bits of Borno,” with Fati Abubakar Gangaran.

Welcome by Professor Scott MacEachern, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs.

IB Lobby. Light refreshments provided.

Thursday 16 January, 6:30-8:30pm

Student Discussion Panel with keynote speakers hosted by the Society of Black Global Scholars: What Does It Mean to Be A Migrant?

Water Pavilion. Light refreshments provided.

Friday 17 January, 10am-2:30pm

Keynote Lectures in AB1087

10am: Shamil Jeppie, University of Cape Town

Introduced by Professor Selina Lai-Henderson

Writing, Timbuktu

The great Malian writer, Amadou Hampaté Bá, is reported to have said that, “In Africa, when an old man dies, it’s a library that burns.” But what happens when a library really disappears, especially in the world from which this writer has emerged? In recent years this has become an actuality in some places and remains a possibility in various parts of Africa as conflicts entail destruction of lives and things like books. This should take us back to the history of writing and books, in this case in West Africa. How and when did writing spread and libraries get formed? This talk will reflect on the question of writing as a technology and book learning and collecting as cultural forms of expression in the region around Timbuktu in West Africa.

11am: Coffee Break

11:30am: Fati Abubakar Gangaran, Duke University

Introduced by Professor Kaley Clements

Bruised, Not Broken

Since Boko Haram, literally meaning ‘Education is Forbidden,’ a terrorist group, launched  its first attack on a quiet morning in 2009 in Maiduguri, Borno State, North East Nigeria, there has been a media frenzy. From 2009 till date, there have been attacks, suicide bombing, abductions, silent killings. And mainstream media covered everything as ‘Breaking News’. There were no other stories besides the numbers, the blasts. The state is currently being plagued by the images of turmoil and despair with a total neglect of its resilience. Our hometown has been reduced to statistics: 20,000 died, 400,000 malnourished. We have become numbers. There are no faces to the conflict. No survivors. And it is as importance to document death as it is resilience. What is life like for the people left behind? What is like after the breaking news and bombs?

Bits of Borno is a photography project that chronicle the lives of people in the communities around Borno. It is the faces of the people who have survived Boko haram. An everyday life.  It is a story of a resilience people who are thriving in the midst of adversity. The project which has been ongoing for three years has also been documenting the humanitarian crisis in the state.

12:30pm: Lunch

1:30pm: Charles Piot, Duke University

Migration Stories: The US Visa Lottery and Global Citizenship

Introduced by Professor Jesse Olsavsky

More Togolese per capita apply for the US Diversity (Green Card) lottery than those from any other African country, with winners attempting to game the system by adding “spouses” and dependents to their dossiers.  The US consulate in Lomé knows this gaming is going on and constructs ever-more elaborate tests to attempt to decipher the authenticity of winners’ marriages and job profiles – and of their moral worth as citizens – tests that immediately circulate to those on the street. This presentation explores the cat-and-mouse game between street and embassy, situating it within the post-Cold War conjuncture – of ongoing crisis, of an eviscerated though-still-dictatorial state, of social death and the emptiness of citizenship under such conditions, of a sprawling transnational diaspora and the desires and longings it creates, of informationalism and its new technologies, of surveillance regimes and their travails, and of the way in which mobility/immobility and sovereignty are newly entangled and co-constitutive in the contemporary moment.

Keynote Speakers

Fati Abubakar Gangaran

Fati Abubakar Gangaran

Fati Abubakar Gangaran is a documentary photographer, photojournalist, public health humanitarian health worker from Nigeria was born and raised in Maiduguri, Borno State. She has a Bachelors degree in Nursing and a Masters degree in Public health and Health Promotion. She specializes in documenting cities, towns highlighting both the positives and negatives of each location. She focuses on health perspectives, using photography as a medium to highlight the problems at community level. She also has an interest in documenting cultures, conflict, urban poverty, rural development and humanitarian issues. She has a special interest in counter narratives for underrepresented communities. In 2015, she embarked on a personal project to showcase her hometown of Borno State, Nigeria at the time of Bokoharam. A project which has been titled ‘Bits of Borno’ on social media  has gained critical acclaim and has been published in media outlets including The New York Times, BBC, Reuters, CNN, Voice of America, Newsweek Europe, Africa is a Country blog, Nigerian newspapers such as ThisDay and the Blueprint. She has been commissioned to work with UNICEF, International Alert, Action Aid and more.

Shamil Jeppie

Shamil Jeppie

Shamil Jeppie received his PhD from Princeton University and is currently is Associate Professor of History at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He has worked on aspects of the social history of Cape Town and Durban, South Africa, and 19th-century Sudan. Shamil founded The Tombouctou Manuscripts Project in which he explored the formation of a culture of collecting in Timbuktu. He also led a National Research Foundation study group on history and the humanities in South Africa today. He has been the chairperson of the South-South Exchange Programme in the History of Development (Sephis), and is now the Director of HUMA, Institute for Humanities in Africa. Shamil serves on various platforms concerned with the development of the humanities, history and heritage in Africa and the global South.

Charles Piot

Charles Piot

Charles Piot is Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University, where he has a joint appointment in African and African American Studies.  His area of specialization is the political economy and cultural history of rural West Africa.  His first book, Remotely Global: Village Modernity in West Africa (1999) attempted to re-theorize a classic out-of-the-way place as within the modern and global.  His second book, Nostalgia for the Future: West Africa after the Cold War(2010), explored shifts in Togolese political culture and sovereignty during the 1990s, a time when the NGOs and charismatic churches take over the bio-political, organizing social and political life in the absence of the state.  His recently-published book, The Fixer: Visa Lottery Chronicles, is about Togolese who apply for and attempt to game the US Diversity Visa lottery.

*Header photo, Eid, (c) Fati Abubakar

 

 

DKU 1st World AIDS Day: Communities Make a Difference

By Bolin Song

The World AIDS Day (WAD) on December 1st is an international day aimed at raising people’s awareness of AIDS and related problems and mourning those who have died of the disease. On December 2nd, a World AIDS Day event was held in DKU, in support of World AIDS Day. This event was supported by the Global Health Research Center and PETAL (Planetary Ethics and Planetary Ethics Lab). The event was organized by undergraduate students Bolin Song, Qianyu(Sherry) Pan, and other undergraduate student volunteers. Continue reading “DKU 1st World AIDS Day: Communities Make a Difference”

在蓝草音乐中打破文化隔阂

By Young Yang (Class of 2023)

         1121日晚上,昆山杜克大学蓝色绿洲学生中心(Blue Oasis Student Center)迎来了四位特殊的客人。他们是专注于蓝草音乐(Bluegrass Music)演奏的“新草乐队”(NewGrass Band),由来自中国的曼陀铃手Tom Pang,主唱Nancy Nan,贝斯手Shun Z,以及来自美国的吉他手John Crespi组成。他们运用自己的才华与热情,给昆山杜克大学的学生带来了一场难忘的视听盛宴。 Continue reading “在蓝草音乐中打破文化隔阂”

Hum/Animal: Undergraduate Humanities Research Conference Call for Papers

Duke Kunshan University is pleased to announce its second Undergraduate Humanities Research Conference from March 13-15, 2020. Distinguished keynote speakers will speak on the conference theme of hum/animal.

Students may present papers on all topics broadly within the humanities and interpretive social sciences; they need not relate to the conference theme.

Panels will be formed around themes based on the applications. Continue reading “Hum/Animal: Undergraduate Humanities Research Conference Call for Papers”

DKU Humanities Research Center Announces Three New Research Labs

Starting January 2020, Duke Kunshan University will be launching three new research labs. The labs will enhance the research capacity and profile of Duke Kunshan University, and provide opportunities for research training for students. Students will be able to sign up for these labs starting in January and gain first hand research experience working with DKU’s top faculty.  Continue reading “DKU Humanities Research Center Announces Three New Research Labs”

Report on Journey of the Universe Art Project

By Xiaoxi Zhu

About 100 members of the Duke Kunshan community have taken part in the university’s first mass-participation art project – an illuminated, nighttime campus procession along a route in the shape of the Big Dipper constellation.

The project was organized by student researchers in the Planetary Ethics and Artificial Intelligence Lab to coincide with a visit by filmmakers Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim on Oct. 10. Continue reading “Report on Journey of the Universe Art Project”