Student Report on Religion+ Literature

Reported by Cody Schmidt, class of 2025

Religion+ Literature is part of HRC’s Tuesday Night Conversation Series, Religion+X, hosted by the Religion+ research group. The informal conversations focus on the intersection between religion and a different topic each week and feature an array of faculty guest speakers.

Literature professors Adrien Pouille, Stephanie Anderson, and Caio Yurgel joined students and faculty in the Water Pavilion on January 17th, along with religion and humanities professors James Miller and Yitzhak Lewis. Flanked by small stacks of books around their chairs, they proclaimed that “everything is literature” and examined works focusing on religion. Continue reading “Student Report on Religion+ Literature”

Student Report: Superdeep #15 “Relational Egalitarianism & Economic Liberty” by Jiyuan (Dmitry) Sun

Reported by Dongkun Lyu, class of 2025

Dmitry conducted a seminar on “equality” in the field of political philosophy on December 1st. He started with a hook question, “what is the point of equality”, and proposed some possible answer by resorting to the scenario of Titanic story. Continue reading “Student Report: Superdeep #15 “Relational Egalitarianism & Economic Liberty” by Jiyuan (Dmitry) Sun”

Student Report: Mysticism Colloquium

Reported by Siyu Wang, Class of 2025

This is a hybrid colloquium in the theme of mysticism.

On December 2nd and 3rd, Duke Kunshan University’s Humanities Research Center held a colloquium themed on mysticism with three lectures given by Boaz Huss, Benoît Vermander, and Wendell Marsh, one student workshop hosted by Wendell Marsh and three panels with the topic of Practices of (De-)mystification, Mysticism and Modernity East and West, and Mysticism and Technology respectedly. Meanwhile, participants all got the chance to enjoy fine food at Dayu Bay and DKU Executive Dining Hall.

Continue reading “Student Report: Mysticism Colloquium”

Student Report: Superdeep #14 “Knowing One’s Dreams” by Weifan (Michelle) Mo

(The content of this seminar is a part of Michelle Mo’s signature work, interests or further discussion please contact weifan.mo@dukekunshan.edu.cn)

Reported by Dongkun Lyu, class of 2025

Michelle attracted us by starting with a general discussion of the intended object(s) of our investigations into dreams and distinguished different disciplines and objects of dream research. The first object is a scientific mechanism underlying the phenomenon of dreaming. The second object is the happenings in the dreams (dream contents) which can be divided into two forms, content assisted by third-party empirical evidence and content which appear to the dreamers in a retrospective sense.

Michelle reinterpreted the second form of happenings in dreams and proposed her first claim: Continue reading “Student Report: Superdeep #14 “Knowing One’s Dreams” by Weifan (Michelle) Mo”

Student Report on ‘Reinterpreting China’s Second World War’ by Professor Rana Mitter

Reported by Mateja Bokan, Class of 2025.

This lecture was part of Statelessness Conference that tells the story of statelessness in Asia and the Pacific during the Second World War.

‘Reinterpreting China’s Second World War’ by Professor Rana Mitter of Oxford University focused on the question of the refugee and how they fit into the narrative of wartime China. Professor started by explaining how there are significant differences in discussion of the what the term statelessness might be within the Chinese context, especially as most understanding of the term comes from a European perspective. Further, he also explained that the vast majority of people who fled war in China during the 1930s and 1940s had many problems, but they were saying they were fed particular information of the Republic of China as means of a larger operation at the time. as such, the experience of refugees During that. It was harder to record and is thus more stimulating to explore compared to the history of refugees in the past decade or early 2000s.

Continue reading “Student Report on ‘Reinterpreting China’s Second World War’ by Professor Rana Mitter”

Student Report: Statelessness Conference Overview

Reported by Mateja Bokan, Class of 2025

Co-sponsored by the Humanities Research Center and the Arts and Humanities Division at Duke Kunshan University, the Statelessness Conference took place on December 1st and 2nd in person and online in Barcelona. This project aims to tell the story of statelessness in Asia and the Pacific during the Second World War by building upon Hannah Arendt’s classic account of the plight of the stateless. Throughout the two days, the focus was to review chapters of the book expected to be published by 2024, as the conclusion to this research project. Continue reading “Student Report: Statelessness Conference Overview”

Student Report on Meredith Oyen’s “The international politics of refugee settlement in Shanghai”

Reported by Chloe Alimurong, Class of 2025

The international politics of refugee settlement in Shanghai by Meredith Oyen: Associate professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)

This lecture is part of Statelessness Conference that tells the story of statelessness in Asia and the Pacific during the Second World War.

In her paper (currently under development) on Statelessness in China and The International Politics of Refugee Settlement in Shanghai, UMBC’s Associate Professor Meredith Oyen described how China navigates the situation regarding different populations of stateless persons after WWII. The international port of Shanghai brought in a mass influx of refugees in 1938. From then, local organizations formed in order to aid these populations, especially Jewish refugees. Oyen studied how China responded to the different mix of refugee situations. Continue reading “Student Report on Meredith Oyen’s “The international politics of refugee settlement in Shanghai””

Student Report on Juvenile Abolitionism

Reported by Cody Schmidt, Class of 2025

This talk is part of HRC’s Freedom Lab with Professor Jesse Olsavsky, a series of events and lectures exploring the relationship between freedom and un-freedom in the modern world. Freedom Lab focuses on topics such as abolitionism, feminism, colonialism, and more.

Michaël Roy, professor of American Studies at Université Paris Nanterre, joined Duke Kunshan’s Jesse Olsavsky, professor of History, to discuss the key role children played in the abolitionist movement. Professor Roy is currently working on a book on the topic of children and abolitionism, with this lecture serving as an introduction to his first draft. Referred to as “juvenile abolitionism,” Roy focuses on the rationale of this phenomenon in the first chapter of his book. Continue reading “Student Report on Juvenile Abolitionism”