Superdeep #20: “DKU Philosophy ’23” | Thu Nov 23, 6:04pm

6:04pm | Water Pavilion

Come to the Water Pavilion this Thursday, Nov 23 at 6:04pm to spend time with arcane creatures of DKU legend, the likes of which you’d normally only encounter in books, caves, or airports: the Philosophers. Members of DKU’s philosophical community (faculty & students, across Divisions) will share & discuss what we’re are up to & excited about philosophically (…& food & drink). Join us!

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The Workshop is Superdeep‘s venue for philosophical work-in-progress research & practice. For more info or to submit proposals for the Workshop, follow this link; for more info on Superdeep more generally, follow this one.

Superdeep is sponsored by DKU’s Humanities Research Center.

Superdeep Nighthawks: “Philo Night” (DKU Philosophers 2023) | Nov 23, 8:04pm

8:04pm | secret venue

This week the Nighthawks return to one of their original callings: following the philosophers’ convergence in Superdeep #20 we will venture out into the night for a good old time together. Join the Philo Night!
To find out where they’ll be headed (which they may or may not know in advance, quite frankly), find them during Superdeep #20 (6:04~7:42pm) in the Water Pavilion.

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Superdeep Nighthawks meet on Thu eve (~8pm till late). For more info, or to submit proposals for the Nighthawks, follow this link; for info on Superdeep more generally, follow this one.

Superdeep is sponsored by DKU’s Humanities Research Center.

Drawing Lines, Spinning Time: Textile Histories at a River’s End

A research project initiated by Ho Rui An and Zian Chen in collaboration with Feng Haoxin, Liew Xiao Theng, Sun Jiyuan, Wang Ruohan, Xiong Xin, Yan Jiayue, Zeng Yuting, Zhang Tianyu, Zhang Yilin, and Zhou Feiyang

  • Community Center East Wing (CCTE), Duke Kunshan University
  • Exhibition: 22 November – 8 December 2023
  • Public program: 22 – 24 November 2023
  • Organized by: DKUNST Art on Campus
  • Supported by: Division of Arts and Humanities | Humanities Research Center, Duke Kunshan University

 

Drawing Lines, Spinning Time: Textile Histories at a River’s End, traces an over-hundred-year history of the Chinese textile industry and its many extensions since the emergence of industrial capitalism within the Yangtze River Delta region. Initiated by Ho Rui An and Zian Chen, the exhibition and public program draws upon materials gathered over a six-month process of fieldwork, archival research, and workshops organized as part of Duke Kunshan University’s (DKU) DKUNST Art on Campus program and with the participation of DKU undergraduates. The program at DKU follows the first large-scale public presentation of the research at Ming Contemporary Art Museum in Shanghai earlier this year.

 

The exhibition is organized into two sections, each providing a distinctive artistic framework to probe into the historical development of the textile industry in the region. The first, “Drawing Lines”, focuses on material culture and draws upon cartographic and archival methods to trace the networks of labor, technology, and capital that connect the industrial centers of the region to its agrarian peripheries and beyond. The second, “Spinning Time”, centers the embodied experience of labor and its representations by examining films set in textile mills and real-life accounts by retired textile workers. Through the public program, the objects and images on display are further articulated through a curated film program and one-day live program that includes a lecture, guided tour, and a mapping exercise.

The DKUNST Art on Campus program is curated by Prof. Zairong Xiang.

 

Public Program

Wednesday, 22 November

  • 1700   Exhibition opening
  • Location: 1F CCTE
  • 1900   Screening and discussion: Huang Baomei
  • Location: Performance Cafe

A rarely seen gem made by the renowned Third Generation Chinese director Xie Jin, Huang Baomei (1958) is a docudrama based on the real-life experiences of the national model worker of the same name. Set at Shanghai No. 17 Cotton Mill, the film focuses on how the workers collectively resolve the problems posed by their aging machines as they strive for a technical breakthrough. As an exemplar of the genre of “artistic documentary” advocated by Premier Zhou Enlai during the Great Leap Forward, the film is known for its collective scripting process and predominantly female cast of actual cotton mill workers playing themselves.

The screening will be followed by a discussion with Prof. Qian Zhu.

Note: Due to the lack of international distribution, the film is only available in Mandarin without subtitles.

 

Thursday, 23 November

  • 1900   Screening and Discussion: A Single Spark
  • Location: Performance Cafe

A Single Spark (1959) is a Shanghainese opera film based on a violent confrontation between indentured laborers and their managers at the Japanese-owned Naigaiwata Company No. 7 Cotton Mill in 1925. Reflecting the dominant tropes of Chinese socialist cinema of the period, the film follows the trials and tribulations of a villager fighting to extricate her daughter from the despotic system of contract labor as well as the collective action taken by her fellow workers that eventually catalyzed the May Thirtieth Movement.

The screening will be followed by a discussion with Prof. Kim Gordon.

Note: Due to the lack of international distribution, the film is only available in Shanghainese with Chinese subtitles.

 

Friday, 24 November

  • 1400   Screening and discussion: Red Skirt Popular in the Street
  • Location: CCT E1011

Set in the fictitious Shanghai-based Dafeng Cotton Mill, Red Skirt Popular on the Street (1984) follows the story of an enterprising model worker as she navigates the challenges of young adult life, from workplace conflicts to choosing what clothes to wear on her days off. A landmark of the early years of the Reform era, the film shows the growing consumer consciousness among the working class amidst the transition to the market economy, as best observed in the spellbinding array of colors seen in their sartorial choices—a reflection of the fashion trends being introduced into the country through trade fairs and catwalks at the time.

The screening will be followed by a discussion with Prof. Andrew Field.

Note: Due to the lack of international distribution, the film is only available in Mandarin without subtitles.

  • 1630   Guided tour
  • Location: 1F CCTE
  • 1700   Mapping exercise: Object and Network
  • Location: 1F CCTE

Using a selection of objects as its starting point, this student-led cartographic exercise attempts to connect the lines between different objects, people, and sites across the Yangtze River Delta region as a way to visually represent the material networks that constitute the region’s modern textile industry.

  • 1730   Discussion moderated by Prof. Zairong Xiang
  • Location: 1F CCTE
  • 1800   Break and refreshments
  • Location: 1F CCTE
  • 1900   Lecture: Spinning Time  Ho Rui An and Zian Chen
  • Location: Performance Cafe

In this lecture, the networked lines of labor, technology, and capital that makeup one river delta region flow into another river delta region as the textile histories along the Yangtze River are woven with those of its southern double: the Pearl River. Drawing upon their research across Shanghai, Nantong, Hong Kong and Guangzhou, Ho Rui An and Zian Chen construct a timeline that inquires into the displacements and returns that characterize China’s modern textile history as much as it reflects on the time of history itself.

Drawing Lines, Spinning Time: Textile Histories at a River’s End

Drawing Lines, Spinning Time: Textile Histories at a River’s End

A research project initiated by Ho Rui An and Zian Chen

in collaboration with Feng Haoxin, Liew Xiao Theng, Sun Jiyuan, Wang Ruohan, Xiong Xin, Yan Jiayue, Zeng Yuting, Zhang Tianyu, Zhang Yilin, and Zhou Feiyang

Community Center East Wing (CCTE)

Duke Kunshan University

Exhibition: 22 November – 8 December 2023

Public program: 22 – 24 November 2023

Organized by: DKUNST Art on Campus

Supported by: Division of Arts and Humanities | Humanities Research Center, Duke Kunshan University

Drawing Lines, Spinning Time: Textile Histories at a River’s End, traces an over-hundred-year history of the Chinese textile industry and its many extensions since the emergence of industrial capitalism within the Yangtze River Delta region. Initiated by Ho Rui An and Zian Chen, the exhibition and public program draws upon materials gathered over a six-month process of fieldwork, archival research, and workshops organized as part of Duke Kunshan University’s (DKU) DKUNST Art on Campus program and with the participation of DKU undergraduates. The program at DKU follows the first large-scale public presentation of the research at Ming Contemporary Art Museum in Shanghai earlier this year.

The exhibition is organized into two sections, each providing a distinctive artistic framework to probe into the historical development of the textile industry in the region. The first, “Drawing Lines”, focuses on material culture and draws upon cartographic and archival methods to trace the networks of labor, technology, and capital that connect the industrial centers of the region to its agrarian peripheries and beyond. The second, “Spinning Time”, centers the embodied experience of labor and its representations by examining films set in textile mills and real-life accounts by retired textile workers. Through the public program, the objects and images on display are further articulated through a curated film program and one-day live program that includes a lecture, guided tour, and a mapping exercise.

The DKUNST Art on Campus program is curated by Prof. Zairong Xiang.

Public Program

Wednesday, 22 November

1700 Exhibition opening

Location: 1F CCTE

1900 Screening and discussion: Huang Baomei

Location: Performance Cafe

A rarely seen gem made by the renowned Third Generation Chinese director Xie Jin, Huang Baomei (1958) is a docudrama based on the real-life experiences of the national model worker of the same name. Set at Shanghai No. 17 Cotton Mill, the film focuses on how the workers collectively resolve the problems posed by their aging machines as they strive for a technical breakthrough. As an exemplar of the genre of “artistic documentary” advocated by Premier Zhou Enlai during the Great Leap Forward, the film is known for its collective scripting process and predominantly female cast of actual cotton mill workers playing themselves.

The screening will be followed by a discussion with Prof. Qian Zhu.

Note: Due to the lack of international distribution, the film is only available in Mandarin without subtitles.

Thursday, 23 November

1900 Screening and discussion: A Single Spark

Location: Performance Cafe

A Single Spark (1959) is a Shanghainese opera film based on a violent confrontation between indentured laborers and their managers at the Japanese-owned Naigaiwata Company No. 7 Cotton Mill in 1925. Reflecting the dominant tropes of Chinese socialist cinema of the period, the film follows the trials and tribulations of a villager fighting to extricate her daughter from the despotic system of contract labor as well as the collective action taken by her fellow workers that eventually catalyzed the May Thirtieth Movement.

The screening will be followed by a discussion with Prof. Kim Gordon.

Note: Due to the lack of international distribution, the film is only available in Shanghainese with Chinese subtitles.

Friday, 24 November

1400 Screening and discussion: Red Skirt Popular in the Street

Location: CCT E1011

Set in the fictitious Shanghai-based Dafeng Cotton Mill, Red Skirt Popular on the Street (1984) follows the story of an enterprising model worker as she navigates the challenges of young adult life, from workplace conflicts to choosing what clothes to wear on her days off. A landmark of the early years of the Reform era, the film shows the growing consumer consciousness among the working class amidst the transition to the market economy, as best observed in the spellbinding array of colors seen in their sartorial choices—a reflection of the fashion trends being introduced into the country through trade fairs and catwalks at the time.

The screening will be followed by a discussion with Prof. Andrew Field.

Note: Due to the lack of international distribution, the film is only available in Mandarin without subtitles.

1630 Guided tour

Location: 1F CCTE

1700 Mapping exercise: Object and Network

Location: 1F CCTE

Using a selection of objects as its starting point, this student-led cartographic exercise attempts to connect the lines between different objects, people, and sites across the Yangtze River Delta region as a way to visually represent the material networks that constitute the region’s modern textile industry.

1730 Discussion moderated by Prof. Zairong Xiang

Location: 1F CCTE

1800 Break and refreshments

Location: 1F CCTE

1900 Lecture: Spinning Time

Ho Rui An and Zian Chen

Location: Performance Cafe

In this lecture, the networked lines of labor, technology, and capital that make up one river delta region flow into another river delta region as the textile histories along the Yangtze River are woven with those of its southern double: the Pearl River. Drawing upon their research across Shanghai, Nantong, Hong Kong and Guangzhou, Ho Rui An and Zian Chen construct a timeline that inquires into the displacements and returns that characterize China’s modern textile history as much as it reflects on the time of history itself.

Superdeep Nighthawks: “Minari” (“미나리”; Chung 2020) | Nov 16, 8:24pm

IB 1008 (IB Auditorium)

In a bustling week join the Nighthawks for a cineastic meal with Lee Isaac Chung‘s 2020 Minari  (미나리; & food & drink). Thu, Nov 9, 8:24pm, IB 1008 (Auditorium).

***

Superdeep Nighthawks meet on Thu eve (~8pm till late). For more info, or to submit proposals for the Nighthawks, follow this link; for info on Superdeep more generally, follow this one.

Superdeep is sponsored by DKU’s Humanities Research Center.

Event Report: The Professional Divide Between Writing & Language Studies in the US: History, Epistemology, and Implications for DKU

On Friday Nov. 2nd, the Third Space Lab (TSL) invited Prof. Tyler Carter from the Language and Culture Center to give a talk at the Brown Bag Lunch Talk event.

Dr. Carter provided an overview of the socio-historical development of English writing and foreign language instruction in the U.S with a focus on the development of the process approach to writing instruction, the audio-lingual approach to language instruction, and a series of key historical events in US higher education reform during the 1960’s. This talk was based on his newly published paper “Apples and Oranges: Toward a Comparative Rhetoric of Writing Instruction and Research in the United States” in College English. As an addendum to the talk, Laura Davies from the Language and Culture Center offered her perspectives on the British system of writing and language and the implication for the DKU context.

The event was well received by the audience, including more than 30 faculty, student and staff members of the DKU community. The speakers and the audience engaged in an excellent discussion of how the different developmental trajectories of wiring and language studies across the globe have an impact on the ideologies,  pedagogical practices, and professional advancement of faculty in and beyond the DKU context. The event was organized and hosted by Prof. Zhang Xin, assistant professor of Chinese and Intercultural Communication, and co-sponsored by the Humanities Research Center (HRC) and the Language and Culture Center (LCC).

Report on Reading Group for “Embracing Diversity: Developing Cultural Competence for Inclusive Education”

On Friday, November 10, 2023, DKU faculty, staff, and students were invited to our second reading group on “Embracing Diversity: Developing Cultural Competence for Inclusive Education”. This time, our discussion focused on Nuno Nodin’s “Queering the Curriculum. Reflections on LGBT+ Inclusivity in Higher Education.” This text was selected for two main reasons. First, it underscores the challenges that (LGBT+) students and staff still face regarding acceptance and integration, potentially influencing their learning and teaching experiences. Second, the text discusses the relevance of LGBT+ inclusivity in pedagogy and how it can be incorporated into higher education, providing examples from a specific discipline.

Around 18 participants, including both familiar faces and newcomers, attended the reading group event. Through the one-hour session, DKU faculty members and students shared personal encounters and anecdotes related to their experiences with the LGBT+ community. They discussed how their attitudes toward their “coming out” professors and students changed before and after reading the text. The sharing of personal experiences and anecdotes sparked discussions and raised awareness of the risks that LGBTQ+ students and staff face when trying to be themselves and coming out in professional space. Furthermore, the participating students shared their opinions on the inclusive pedagogies they would prefer their professors to adopt in class. Although there was not enough time to discuss the last question: What are your recommendations on how DKU can foster a more inclusive environment, encouraging understanding and empathy among both students and faculty members?, we plan to continue these conversations in our future events.

The event was organized by Zhenjie Weng, Assistant Professor of English Language Education, and Yanan Zhao, Senior Lecturer of English for Academic Purposes, from the Language and Culture Center. The event was sponsored by the Humanities Research Center, covering the fees for event promotion and refreshments for attendees.

 

Understand, Predict, and Enhance User Behavior in Mixed Reality

Nov 21st 10-11 am

Meeting ID: 520 960 7561

Guest: Dr. Yukang Yan

Assistant Professor at University of Rochester / Postdoctoral Researcher at Carnegie Mellon University

ABSTRACT:

My research focuses on the enhancements in human computer interaction in Mixed Reality. As the integration of digital and physical worlds through Mixed Reality expands the interaction space beyond traditional screens, it has a significant impact on how users perceive and interact with the world and themselves. Through conducting user studies, I aim to observe and model the behavioral and perceptual patterns of users as they interact with Mixed Reality. Based on these findings, I design and develop interaction techniques that are tailored to these behavioral changes in order to facilitate user input and information display. These techniques include multimodal input methods utilizing hand gestures, head movements, and facial expressions, as well as adaptive user interfaces that take into account the user’s mental state and environmental context to optimize information display. Additionally, I explore augmentation methods that allow users to surpass their capabilities in the real world, such as embodying healthier virtual avatars or non-humanoid avatars to gain unique experiences not possible in reality.

BIO:

Dr. Yukang Yan is an Assistant Professor in the ROCHCI group in the Department of Computer Science, University of Rochester. Before that, he was a postdoctoral researcher in the Augmented Perception Lab, Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He earned both his Ph.D. and Bachelor’s degree from Tsinghua University. His research focus lies in Human-Computer Interaction and Mixed Reality. He published journals and papers at ACM CHI, ACM UIST, ACM IMWUT, IEEE VR, with ACM CHI 2020 Honorable Mention Award, ACM CHI 2023 Honorable Mention Award, IEEE VR Best Paper Nominee Award. His thesis won Outstanding Doctoral Thesis at Tsinghua University.

Interfacing with Digitality: Practices in Curation

Speaker: Hayeon Heather Kim (Artistic Director, Materiaux Gallery, Seoul/Korea)

Hosted by: Prof. Jung Choi, Ph.D.(Anthropocene XR Lab, HRC)

Date and Time: 13 November 2023 13:00 pm Location: LIB 1113

Speaker: Hayeon-Heather Kim is a co-founder and the artistic director Materiaux focuses primarily on emerging and established Korean artists, particularly those whose practice involve various art forms and alternative modalities of visual art production and consumption.

Digitality has transformed our understanding and experience of art, calling for new forms of collaboration between artists, researchers, and curators. Immaterial and or time-based art presents critical challenges not only in the presentation of the works but also in their conservation. Curating new forms of media art requires an interdisciplinary, post-object approach to disseminate the works within and beyond the white cube. This talk will share recent examples of curatorial practices that engage in the creative use of technology for exhibition, collection, and preservation. The primary goal of this talk is to encourage discussion on how to overcome the inherent challenges in this type of art and to seek sustainability for the individuals working in the field.

Unveiling the Patriarchy: Exploring Homosociality, Homophobia, and Misogyny

Join us for a lecture on “Homosocial, Homophobia, Misogyny: understanding patriarchal society” with sociologist, intellectual feminist activist, and best-selling author Chizuko Ueno from Tokyo University.

Date: Fri, Nov 10th

Time: 10:00 – 11:30 AM BJT

Venue: IB Lecture Hall

欢迎参加由东京大学社会学家、女权运动家、畅销书作家上野千鹤子主讲的讲座:“同性恋、恐同症、厌女症:理解父权社会”。

日期: 11 月 10 日,星期五

时间:上午 10:00 –  11:30

地点:IB  Lecture Hall

期待在现场见到大家