Category: Junior Faculty Research Seminar Page 1 of 2

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-13

Meifang CHEN, Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Claudia NISA, Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science is scheduled to give a seminar on Dec 10th (see below). Please email yl827@duke.edu if you want to get the Zoom link.

Presentation date& time: 9:30-10:30 am Dec 10th (Friday) Beijing Time via Zoom
• 30mins presentation
• 30mins Q&A

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-12

Huansheng CAO, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science is scheduled to give a seminar on Dec 3rd (see below). Please email yl827@duke.edu if you want to get the Zoom link.

Presentation date& time: 9:30-10:30 am Dec 3rd (Friday) Beijing Time via Zoom
• 30mins presentation
• 30mins Q&A

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-11

Xin TONG, Assistant Professor of Computation and Design is scheduled to give a seminar on Dec 2nd (see below). Please email yl827@duke.edu if you want to get the Zoom link.

Presentation date& time: 9:30-10:30 am Dec 2nd (Thursday) Beijing Time via Zoom
• 30mins presentation
• 30mins Q&A

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-10

Nathan HAUTHALER, Lecturer in Philosophy is scheduled to give a seminar on Nov 19th (see below). Please email yl827@duke.edu if you want to get the Zoom link.

Presentation date& time: 9:30-10:30 am Nov 19th (Friday) Beijing Time via Zoom
• 30mins presentation
• 30mins Q&A

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-09

Ira SOBOLEVA, Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science is scheduled to give a seminar on Nov 3rd (see below). Please email yl827@duke.edu if you want to get the Zoom link.

Presentation date& time: 8-9 pm Nov 3rd (Wednesday) Beijing Time via Zoom
• 30mins presentation
• 30mins Q&A

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-08

Philip SANTOSO, Assistant Professor of Political Science gave a presentation on the topic of “The Nature and Sources of Voters’ Beliefs about the Left-Right Positions of Political Parties” in September (see flyer below).

Presentation date& time: 9:30-10:30 am Sep 10th (Friday) Beijing Time via Zoom
• 30mins presentation
• 30mins Q&A

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-07

Keping WU, Associate Professor of Anthropology is scheduled to give a seminar in May (see below). Please email jl1093@duke.edu if you want to get the Zoom link.

Presentation date& time: May 14 (Friday) 9:30-10:30 am Beijing Time via Zoom
• 30mins presentation
• 30mins Q&A

Northwest Yunnan is nested in the border areas of Tibet, Myanmar and Southwest China. The religiously and ethnically diverse region has been astonishingly lack of “conflict,” as what is often assumed in regions of ethnic and religious differences. This paper argues that there is an organic form of pluralism through frequent inter-ethnic and inter-religious marriages, multi-lingual daily interactions and strategic ethnicity registrations. Ethnic and religious boundaries are made permanently or temporarily permeable through celebration of boundary-crossing rituals such as weddings and funerals and other shared experience such as collective labor and migrant work. Furthermore, analysis of its ideas of the spirits reveal that this region has a strong tradition that associates “the other” with power and creativity, instead of inferiority or the need to be subdued. This sacred and secular understanding of power thus enables the people to use kinship, rituals and other shared experiences to foster group-formation that is fluid, porous and malleable, instilling empathy and obligation as the basis of this pluralistic borderland society.

To be updated

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-06

Xin ZHANG, Assistant Professor of Chinese Language and Intercultural Communication is scheduled to give a seminar in March (see below). Please email fx28@duke.edu if you want to get the Zoom link.

Presentation date& time: March 25 (Thursday) 20:00-21:00 Beijing Time via Zoom
• 30mins presentation
• 30mins Q&A

Being able to function in a Chinese workplace is what many learners of Chinese as a Second Language (CSL) report as their long-term motivation and the ultimate goal of learning Chinese language and culture. Yet few empirical studies have investigated CSL learners at the most sophisticated level to understand what leads to and constitutes their multilingual experience and identity co-construction as a foreign professional in modern Chinese workplace. The project examines foreign professionals (including academians) with advanced Chinese skills working in a multilingual environment in China where being able to use Mandarin is integral to the subjects’ professional standing and performance. Engaging the current debate over a “multilingual/multicultural turn” in fields concerning language learning and development as well as intercultural engagement, this project adopts, and contributes to the theorization of, Third-Space personae as a key analytical notion in understanding the negotiated and co-constructed nature of selfhood/identity in multilingual and intercultural interactions.

This paper focuses on the ways race and native-speakerness as well as their ideological manifestation in a Chinese context interfere with selfhood/identity negotiation of heritage and non-heritage (white) CSL speakers. We examine if and how Third-Space personae mediate the racialized expectations of these foreign professionals in multilingual Chinese workplaces.

  • Zhu Hua, Professor and Chair of Educational Linguistics, University of Birmingham
  • Xiaobin Jian, Associate Professor of Chinese, The Ohio State University 

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-05

Horvath Gergely, Assistant Professor of Economics is scheduled to give a seminar to introduce his research concept (see below). Please email fx28@duke.edu if you want to get the Zoom link.

Presentation date& time: March 12 (Friday) 9:30-10:30am Beijing Time via Zoom

• 9:00 -9:30 presentation
• 9:30-10:00 Q&A

In an online experiment, we study the effectiveness of policy interventions in reducing the impact of behavioral biases on the job search. Due to the present bias, individuals set a lower search effort and a lower reservation wage than the optimal values, while the sunk-cost fallacy makes individuals reduce their reservation wage over the search spell. We compare the effects of search cost reduction and nudging on alleviating these biases. We find that search cost reduction increases the investment in the search effort and the individual welfare but not the reservation wage. Conversely, nudging increases the reservation wage, but not the investment in search effort or individual welfare. Furthermore, we show that both search cost reduction and nudging are effective in alleviating the impact of sunk-cost fallacy on the choice of the reservation wage. Our results suggest that behavioral interventions should be part of active labor market policies.

  • Andrew Schotter, Professor of Economics, NYU

Junior Faculty Research Seminar Series-04

Benjamin Anderson, Assistant Professor of Global Health is scheduled to give a seminar to introduce his study proposal in February (see below). Please email fx28@duke.edu if you want to get the Zoom link.

Presentation date& time: February 26 (Friday) 9:30-10:30 am Beijing Time via Zoom
• 30mins presentation
• 30mins Q&A

Pork production in China is rapidly increasing and swine production operations continue to expand to meet demand. Disease outbreaks can readily threaten these production sites resulting in large economic losses. Recent disease examples include porcine epidemic diarrheal virus (PEDV), highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2), and African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV). The movement of pathogens between humans and animals (zoonoses) also pose a unique challenge for disease control in swine production settings. Surveillance within swine farms can be an effective approach for the early identification of new disease threats and the mitigation of transmission before broad dissemination among a herd occurs. However, due to being moderately invasive, standard surveillance practices might not always be feasible as they may disrupt normal production operations. Furthermore, the cost of conducting surveillance, particularly in large-scale settings, could also be a barrier to its routine implementation. Non-invasive environmental bioaerosol sampling could be an effective and affordable approach for conducting routine surveillance in farms, providing an additional tool for farmers to protect their animals and themselves from new disease threats.

In this proposed two year prospective epidemiological study, we aim to 1) use a novel bioaerosol sampling approach to determine the prevalence of known swine pathogens; 2) apply a pathogen discovery algorithm to identify new disease threats; 2) evaluate the transmission dynamics of detected pathogens by comparing bioaerosol sampling, with water, fecal slurry, and surface sampling data; 4) characterize zoonotic transmission risk of detected pathogens by also studying swine worker sera and nasal wash samples.

  • Greg Gray, Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases;Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore Professor, Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases”, Duke
  • Charlie Nunn, Gosnell Family Professor in Global Health, Duke
  • Chris Woods, Duke
  • L Gayani Tillekeratne Assistant Professor of Medicine
  • Gavin Smith, Professor & Interim Director | Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS
  • Lijing Yan, DKU
  • Jim Junfeng Zhang, Duke
  • Patrick Casey James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke-NUS

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