Reading List: Black History Month

  1. The Souls of Black Folks, W.E.B. DuBois
  2. African American History and Devotionals, Teresa Fry Brown
  3. Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God
  4. Go Tell It On The Mountain, James Baldwin
  5. Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston
  6. Beloved, Toni Morrison
  7. Underground Railroad, Colson Whitehead
  8. The Cross and the Lynching Tree, James Cone
  9. The African American Century, Cornel West and Henry Louis Gates
  10. Knowing Christ Crucified, M. Shawn Copeland
  11. Our Lives Matter, Pamela Lightsey
  12. A Testament of Hope, Martin Luther King Jr,
  13. Just A Sister Away, Renita Weems
  14. Blood Done Sign My Name, Tim Tyson
  15. The Autobiography of Malcolm X
  16. Roots, Alex Haley
  17. Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839, Fanny Kemble
  18. The Audacity of Hope, Barack Obama
  19. To Die For The People, Huey Newton
  20. An American Marriage, Tayari Jones
  21. Proud Shoes, Pauli Murray
  22. Washington Black, Esi Edugyan
  23. Nickel Boys, Colson Whitehead
  24. The Third Reconstruction, William Barber
  25. Enfleshing Freedom, M. Shawn Copeland
  26. Were You There? David Goatley
  27. Making A Way Out of No Way, Monica Coleman
  28. Katie’s Canon, Katie Geneva Canon
  29. Deeper Shades of Purple, ed. Stacey Floyd Thomas
  30. MARCH, vol. I, vol. II, and vol. III, John Lewis
  31. Breathe: A Letter To My Sons, Imani Perry
  32. Word, Like Fire, Valerie Cooper
  33. This Far by Faith, Quinton Dixie and Juan Willians
  34. Economic Ethics and The Black Church, Wylin D. Wilson

Finding Commentaries in the Divinity School Library: A Short Guide

Need to find one or more biblical commentaries* for a sermon or an assignment? Below you’ll find advice on how to find commentaries using the Atla database, the Reference Room, the library catalog, and more!

Using Atla

You can access the Atla database directly from the Divinity Library’s homepage — look for the blue catalog search box and choose the second tab (Atla). Use the keywords “Daniel commentary” (or whatever book of the Bible you are searching for) and hit Search.

Now. Atla indexes a lot of material — articles, book reviews, books, and more. To narrow it down to commentaries specifically, scroll down and watch the left-hand menu. “Source Types” has a default selection of “All Results,” but that’s not what you want. Select “Books” — the page will refresh, and now all the results will be books!

Browse through the results and pick a few you like. The item record will only give you a little information — the title, the author, and the publication data. Once you’re ready to find the book itself, click the “Get it at Duke” icon. This icon will run a search for an online version of the book, and it will likely take you to a page that says we don’t have it — but that just means we don’t have it online. The same page gives you options to locate the book in the print catalog, OR request the item through Interlibrary Loan!

Using the Catalog — Finding PRINT or ONLINE Commentaries

Go back to the Divinity Library homepage and find the blue search box again. Use the same search string we just used for Atla (book name + commentary) in the main catalog search box. Sometimes if your book of the Bible is a common English name (Samuel, Daniel, Matthew, Mark, etc.), it helps to toss the word “Bible” in there, too.

You might get a lot of results — look at the menu on the left-hand side of the page for helpful ways to narrow them, for example:

“Available Online” — Check this box to only see e-books you can access immediately!

“Location” — Select “Divinity” to limit your search results to print books that are from the Divinity Library’s collection.

“Publication Year” — This one is towards the bottom of the menu, but very helpful if you are looking for the latest scholarship (e.g., within the last 25 years).

Using the Reference Room

The entire back wall of the Reference Room is filled with commentary series, arranged in alphabetical order by series title — starting with ANCHOR BIBLE on your left and proceeding to WORD BIBLICAL COMMENTARY on your right. The series are then arranged in order of canon (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus…). These are all modern commentaries (after the development of historical critical methodology),  and the wall is designed to be very easy to browse. None of these volumes can circulate (which means they’ll always be right there in the Reference Room for you to use!), but we typically have a circulating copy of all Ref Room commentaries that you can find in the stacks and check out.

One exception to the Reference Room’s WALL OF MODERNITY is the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture series. Per its title, this series gathers short excerpts from commentaries by Early and Medieval church fathers and mothers on particular passages of scripture. Interested in using the ACCS or other methods to find pre-modern commentaries? Keep reading!

Looking for Pre-Modern Commentaries

What is a pre-modern commentary, and why should you be interested in studying one? We’re using “pre-modern” here to mean “before the development and popularization of historical criticism”; in other words, before the 19th century. (As for why you should care about pre-modern biblical commentary, go read David Steinmetz’s “The Superiority of Pre-Critical Exegesis,” chapter one in Taking the Long View.) When you’re well and truly convinced by Steinmetz’s thesis and ready to go about finding some good pre-modern material, here are a few places to start:

Searching the Library Catalog: Pull up the library catalog and use the following search string: “Bible. Daniel. Commentaries. Early works to 1800” Seriously. Copy and paste it (quotation marks and all) and hit SEARCH. (And insert whichever book of the Bible you are studying for “Daniel” in the example.) This will bring you pre-modern commentaries from our library catalog. Enjoy!

Using the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture Series: ACCS gathers lots of short excerpts on short passages of Scripture, but these come from longer works. So how do you find the longer works? First, find a passage you like in ACCS. Locate the author (small caps, after the bolded section heading), and the source (small caps, at the end of the section). The source will have a footnote: look for the corresponding number at the bottom of the page. Here you will find an abbreviation of the larger source: LCC 3:178-79, for example, means Library of Christian Classics, volume 3, pages 178-79. Not sure what the abbreviation stands for? Look for the Abbreviations section in the front of the volume you are using. Popular series in English include ACW (Ancient Christian Writers), ANF (Ante-Nicene Fathers), FC (Fathers of the Church), LCC (Library of Christian Classics), and NPNF (Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers) — and ALL of these series are in the Reference Room! (Ask a librarian if you get stuck.)

Using Biblia Patristica: Interested in finding commentaries in Latin and Greek? The Biblia Patristica series is located in the Reference Room at BR 66.5 .U53, or you can also use the online, open access search tool at BiBLindex. These resources gather citations of passages in the writings of early and medieval Christians that comment on Scripture and organize them by verse. Start by looking up your passage in a Biblia Patristica volume: you’ll find abbreviated citations of longer works; for example, “TERT PAT ” is Tertullian’s De patientia. (See the abbreviation list at the front of the volume — which will also tell you Tertullian’s De patientia can be found in CCL (Corpus Christianorum, Series Latina) volume 1. Look closely at the citation: often Biblia Patristica will give you the book and chapter number of the larger work, and/or the page and line number from the critical edition in CCL or PG (Patrologiae, Series Graeca) or PL (Patrologiae, Series Latina)! Confused? Find Dr. Benjamin. She loves helping people learn Biblia Patristica.

Browsing the Stacks for Commentaries

The Divinity School Library uses the Library of Congress classification system, which arranges books by subject. Each book of the Bible is its own subject — commentaries on Old Testament books start with Genesis at BS 1231 and end with Malachi at 1671; OT Apocryphal books occupy BS 1711-1871; New Testament books start with Matthew at BS 2570 and end with Revelation at 2820; and NT Apocryphal books occupy BS 2860-2970. Looking for commentaries on Daniel? Go browse BS 1550-1560! This section will be full of commentaries* and monographs** on Daniel. The full list of biblical books by Library of Congress Classification Number can be found here.

 

*What is a commentary?

A commentary is an in-depth, verse-by-verse analysis of a book of the Bible. Commentaries often interact with the original language of a text as well as its cultural, historical, literary, and socio-political contexts, in order to help readers understand the text’s function and purpose.

 

** What is a monograph?

A monograph is a book that is written (graph) by a single (mono) author, typically on a single subject. But a monograph is not necessarily a commentary! Remember, a commentary is a verse-by-verse engagement with a text. A monograph might go on at length about something related to the biblical text (e.g., coins within the Roman empire and currency used in 1st-century Judea), but will not offer verse-by-verse commentary. Trying to figure out if the book you have chosen is a commentary on Matthew? See if you can find the part that deals with Matthew 4. And Matthew 16. If that was an easy exercise, you have a commentary!

 

De-coding your Syllabus: Practical Tips for the Beginning of the Semester

Welcome to Duke Divinity School! We know the first days of a new semester are always hectic — and on top of it all, professors keep sending you 18-page documents full of dates and bibliography entries and bullet points! A syllabus can be complicated and intimidating, even for people who have been in academia for years, so please know it is NOT just you.

Don’t panic. Do this instead.

Sit down with a hard copy of the syllabus, a highlighter, and your personal calendar. (And a cookie.) 

Everything in this syllabus is important. But let’s grab the REALLY important stuff first.

REQUIRED TEXTS: These usually show up early in the syllabus. You MUST have these books OR know exactly how you can access them. HINT: if a reading says “SAKAI” next to it, the professor has posted it to your course’s Sakai site. If a reading doesn’t have this notation, YOU are responsible for making sure you have access to the reading, whether by purchasing the book or finding it in the library. Professors send their book lists to the library before each semester so that we can collect “e-reserves”, or electronic copies of required textbooks, that you can access online and read from home or from your favorite Durham coffee shop. Give it some thought: choose which books you want to invest in buying and which books you can find at the library.

ASSIGNMENTS LIST: Open the syllabus to find the calendar of assignments. Sometimes you have to dig a few pages to find it. And it may be under a few different categories, but often it will be under something akin to “Assignments and Policies.” You are looking for assignments and DATES. This section is the most important thing in the entire document.  Read it closely, TWICE, and immediately write or enter all of the assignments into your calendar on the days they are due. Midterm exam? In-class presentation? Final paper? Final paper due the same week as all your other final papers for all your other classes? Don’t let any of these dates sneak up on you! GET THEM ON THE CALENDAR. Start to make a plan for the hard weeks in the semester now. Do you know who’s great at helping make a plan for the hard weeks in the semester? Judith Heyhoe, director of the Writing Center and Academic Support! Email her at jheyhoe@div.duke.edu — she will be very happy to help you look at your schedule.

ASSIGNMENT DETAILS: Knowing you have a paper due in the first week of October and getting it on your calendar is a great first step. But as soon as you get it on the calendar, your whole brain is going to go, “Great! Let’s not worry about this until October 1.” HOLD THAT THOUGHT. Flip through the rest of the syllabus and see if you can find a section that gives more detail on the expectations for each assignment. Flag this section with a Post-it note that will stick out the side of your syllabus so you can find it easily again when you start worrying about an assignment in earnest. But do yourself a favor and read it now, and think about how you can prepare: does the assignment ask you to review a book that’s not on the assigned readings list? Summarize and analyze the course readings up to this point in the semester? You should make a plan for how you’re going to get that work done before the night before your assignment is due.

RHYTHM OF A WEEK: What does a normal week in this class look like? Find the CALENDAR OF ASSIGNED READINGS. Slowly skim through the first couple of weeks. About how many pages are you being asked to read to prepare for class? Do you need to write a summary of the readings, post a discussion question for Sakai, email your preceptor a reflection paragraph, or prepare some other response to each week’s readings? Figure out exactly how much work this class is going to be, and figure out when you’re going to do it. Reading is slow work! Try to find spaces in your schedule where you know you can read without being stressed about rushing off to your next thing.

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS: Okay, admit it: you skipped ahead to see what you need to read for next week, and you saw “CCOT” and some numbers and got confused. Slow down! Go back and look through the different required texts and see if any of them have an acronym next to them. Often these books have long, complicated titles — and in the assignments sections, a professor will only refer to the book by its author’s last name, or by an acronym. So for the Cambridge Companion to the Old Testament, a professor might call it CCOT — aha!

OTHER AWFUL WORDS: Monograph… Peer-reviewed article… Chicago/Turabian style footnotes… Highlight ANY word you aren’t sure about and either look it up or ask your friendly librarians. Sometimes in a syllabus, professors will speak in the ways in which they are used to speaking and reading, which often includes jargon that is unfamiliar to people who haven’t spent the last decade (or more) immersed in the academy. And, if you feel overwhelmed from the start of the semester because you don’t understand the syllabus, that can be a difficult start to the class. We want you to feel empowered!

PARTING THOUGHTS: If there is ANYTHING you do not understand in a syllabus, make an appointment with either Dr. Katie Benjamin or Lacey Hudspeth on Sakai, or email them at katie.benjamin@duke.edu or lacey.hudspeth@duke.edu. Librarians are here to help make your lives easier and to aid in your academic success in any ways that we can! 

Reading List: Latin/x and Mujerista Theology

Books (and where to find them)

  1. En La Lucha, Ada Maria Isasi-Diaz — Ten-year anniversary editionFirst edition
  2. A Reader in Feminist Latina Theology: Religion and Justice — PrintElectronic
  3. Mujerista Theology, Ada Maria Isasi-Diaz — PrintElectronic
  4.  Our Cry for Life: Feminist Theology from Latin America, Maria Pilar Aquino — Print
  5. Borderlands/La Frontera, Gloria E. Anzaldua — Print
  6. A Theology of Liberation, Gustavo Gutierrez — PrintElectronic
  7. The Mestizo Augustine: A Theologian Between Two Cultures: Justo Gonzales — Electronic
  8. Mañana : Christian Theology from a Hispanic Perspective, Justo L. González — Print
  9. The Faith of the People: Theological Reflections on Popular Catholicism by Orlando O. Espín — Print
  10. From the Heart of Our People: Latino/a Explorations in Catholic Systematic Theology, edited by Orlando O. Espín and Miguel H. Díaz — Print
  11. Reading the Bible From the Margins by Miguel De La Torre — Print
  12. Theologizing en Espanglish by Carmen Nanko-Fernández — Electronic
  13. Christ Outside the Gate by Orlando Costas — Print
  14. Ignacio Ellacuria: Essays on History, Liberation, and Salvation, edited by Michael E. Lee — Print
  15. Good News from the Barrio: Prophetic Witness for the Church by Harold Recinos — Print
  16. The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Latino/a Theology — Electronic
  17. In Our Own Voices: Latino/a Renditions of Theology, edited by Benjamín Valentín — PrintElectronic
  18. The Gospel of Cesar Chavez by Mario Garcia and Virgil Elizondo — Print
  19. Indecent Theology by Marcella Maria Althaus-Reid — PrintElectronic
  20. Latinas Evangélicas by Loida I. Martell-Otero, Zaida Maldonado Perez, Elizabeth Conde-Frazier — Print
  21. Galilean Journey: The Mexican-American Promise by Virgil Elizondo — Print
  22. Longing for Running Water: Ecofeminism and Liberation by Ivone Gebara — Print
  23. Decolonizing Biblical Studies: A View from the Margins by Fernando F. Segovia — Print
  24. Faith Formation and Popular Religion: Lessons from the Tejano Experience by Anita de Luna — Print
  25. Freedom Made Flesh: Mission of Christ and His Church by Ignacio Ellacuria — Print
  26. Mestizo Christianity: Theology from the Latino Perspective by Arturo J. Bañuelas — Print
  27. Caminemos con Jesus by Roberto S. Goizueta — Print
  28. Creada a su imagen: Una pastoral integral para la mujer, Agustina Luvis Núñez
  29. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: Selected Writings — Print
  30. Hope Abundant: Third World and Indigenous Women’s Theology, Clara Luz Ajo Lázaro — Print
  31. Evangelicals in Mexico: Their Hymnody and Its Theology, Dinorah B. Méndez — Print
  32. Hispanic Bible Institutes: A Community of Theological Construction, Elizabeth Conde-Frazier — Print
  33. A Many Colored Kingdom: Multicultural Dynamics for Spiritual Formation, Elizabeth Conde-Frazier

Forma para pedir libros desde el Library Service Center (LSC) como visitante

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Sojourners’ Latinx Theology Reading List: https://sojo.net/articles/latinx-theology-reading-list

The Global Church Project: 18 Latin American Female Theologians you should know about: https://theglobalchurchproject.com/18-latin-american-female-theologians-know/

 

SPANISH-LANGUAGE or LATIN/X THEOLOGY WEBSITES, DATABASES, and JOURNALS

  1. The Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz Project
  2. Tesis Doctorals en Xarxa (dissertations completed in Spain)
  3. Antigüedad y Cristianismo
  4. Caminhando (revista published by the School of Theology at the Methodist University of Sao Paolo — in Portuguese)
  5. Ciencias Sociales y Religión/Ciências Sociais e Religião (CS&R)
  6. Estudos Teologicos (Portuguese)
  7. Humanitas (revista de antropología y cultura cristiana)
  8. Ignaziana (from the Centro de Espiritualidad Ignaciana de la Pontificia Universidad Gregoriana in Rome)
  9. Ilu: Revista de Ciencias de las Religiones
  10. Revista Batista Pioneira: Biblia, Teologia, Pratica (Portuguese)
  11. Revista: Cultura & Religion
  12. Sociedades Biblicas Unidas: Traduccion de la Biblia
  13. Biblioteca de la Iglesia Reformada: Biblias, Catecismos, y Obras Reformadas
  14. Colección Latinoamericana del Seminario Teológico de Princeton: Books and Periodicals
  15. RIBLA – Revista de Interpretacion de la Biblia Latinoamericana

Duke Self-Checkout: Adding a Proxy

Supported by meeScan, Duke’s new Self-Checkout feature is a fast and easy way to check out books from Duke Libraries. Perkins, Bostock, Divinity, Goodson Law, and Marine all have a meeScan.

The self-checkout unit can be used with the attached iPad, or an app you download on your smart phone. Search “Duke Self-checkout” in your phone’s app store:

 

How to set up a proxy account:

  1. Have your research assistant download the Duke Self-checkout app.
  2. On your research assistant’s phone, choose the Change Patron icon in the lower right hand corner, and select the green “Log In” option.
  3. This will take you to a secure page that prompts you to enter your Net ID and password. Enter YOUR OWN password on your RA’s phone; DO NOT send your RA your login information.
  4. Your RA will now see two accounts on their phone, and they will be able to switch back and forth:
  5. And whenever a book is checked out to your account, you will get an email: 
  6. When the academic year ends, or when you are finished using a particular RA as your proxy, they can delete you from their Self-checkout app by selecting the red “log out” option under the Change Patron icon:
  7. Questions? Need help getting started? Stop by the Divinity Library Circulation Desk, and we will be happy to help.

Databases and Electronic Resources Divinity Students Should Know About: A Quick Guide

As Duke Divinity prepares to transition to online classes for the remainder of the spring semester, you might already be asking yourself how you will research that seminar paper remotely. Whether you find yourself researching from your home in Durham or elsewhere, Duke Divinity Library resources are here for you, 24 hours a day — if you know how to look. Below are the search strategies and top databases Divinity students should know about:

 

1. Searching for Electronic Books

 

 

 

Our EBooks tab on the main Divinity Library page searches the Books and Media catalog and automatically limits the results to “Resource Type -> Book” and “Access Type -> Online.” If you do this using “Theology” as a keyword search, you get over 15,500 results! You can also use this strategy to see what commentaries we have electronically to help you with your exegesis paper. For commentaries on Mark, for example, search “mark bible commentary,” and bring up over 100 results. “Exodus bible commentary” brings up 60 results, and “1 Samuel bible commentary” brings up 80 results.

Good to Know: For these searches, it’s important to include the word “bible” because the catalog search will treat all of your search terms as keywords. That means a search simply for “mark commentary” will also bring up any work whose author’s first name is Mark, or that has Mark in the title, etc., regardless of whether the book in question has anything to do with the Gospel of Mark! If you want to learn more about search strategies for commentaries, check out our Guide to Finding Commentaries in the Divinity Library!

 

2. The Atla Database

Atla is the biggest religion and theology database in the world, and once again, you can search it with keywords directly from the Divinity Library’s main catalog search box. When you find articles related to your topic, be sure to look for the following icons:

These will take you directly to the article to read online or download and save. If we do not have the article immediately through one of our online subscriptions, the “get it @ Duke” button will take you to a deeper search of the print/online catalog. Want more help searching Atla? Watch our video tutorial here.

Good to Know: Sometimes Atla and JSTOR don’t link directly to the downloadable PDF of an article. Before you give up, note the title of the journal your article appears in and use the “Online Journal Titles” search option from the main Divinity Library page to see if Duke subscribes to the journal through another platform. You can then search for the article by the date/issue in which it appeared.

 

3. Oxford Biblical Studies Online

Offers access to study Bibles as well as tools such as timelines, concordances, dictionaries, maps and images, and over 6,000 entries from Oxford reference sources. Commentary sources available on this site include Oxford Bible CommentaryNew Oxford Annotated Bible (NRSV), Oxford Study Bible (REB), Jewish Study Bible (TANAKH), Catholic Study Bible (NAB), and the Access Bible (NRSV)

 

4. JSTOR

Another huge database of online journals and articles you can search directly from the Divinity Library’s website is JSTOR. This database is more broadly focused than Atla — it includes religion and theology, but also history, literature, anthropology, classical studies, cultural studies, economics, natural sciences, and many, many more.

 

5. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Atla and JSTOR and other online databases are fantastic when you’re trying to test-drive a thesis idea and you want to see who else has written on a topic. Another great resource for this sort of work is ProQuest’s database for dissertations and theses.

Because many dissertations have their full text available, ProQuest will use your keywords to search everything: the first results will be the most relevant ones, which have your keywords in the title. But the results will include any dissertation that mentions your search terms anywhere. For example, a search for “feminist theology,” for example, brings up over 57,000 results! A search for “thomas aquinas” yields over 33,000 results, while “bonaventure” brings up over 10,000.

Note that if you want to limit your results to truly recent work, there’s a helpful Date Range selector in the left-hand column:

You can also narrow your search by Subject, Language, University/Institution, etc. It’s also important to realize that scholars sometimes place an “embargo” on their dissertation while they work on revising and publishing it as a book, so if you are looking for a specific person’s work, you may not find it. Want to browse dissertations completed by Duke Divinity students? Check out this open access repository.

 

6. The Encyclopedia of the Bible and its Reception

Looking for a quick way into your research on a person, place, or topic in the Bible? EBR gives an overview of how a concept (e.g., “Abraham”) functions within Scripture, but also gives a sense of the concept’s reception history among Christians, Jews, and Muslims. From the publisher: “The Encyclopedia of the Bible and Its Reception (EBR) pursues a twofold task. Firstly, it comprehensively renders the current state of knowledge on the origins and development of the Bible according to its different canonic forms in Judaism and Christianity. Secondly, it documents the history of the Bible’s reception, not only in the Christian churches and the Jewish Diaspora, but also in literature, art, music, and film, as well as Islam and other religious traditions and current religious movements. With the help of a comprehensive search engine the online edition of the EBR makes the articles fully searchable.”

 

7. Ministry Matters

Looking for online Bible commentaries, sermon resources, Bible study guides, and other tools for ministry? Ministry Matters gathers resources for worship, teaching, preaching, and more. You can search the “legacy library” (default setting), or use the orange banner at the top to navigate to the “research library.” You’ll find full text copies of commentaries on individual books of the Bible and more, including Abingdon Old Testament Commentaries, Abingdon New Testament Commentaries, Immersion Bible Studies, the New Interpreter’s Bible, and more.

 

8. Intelex Past Masters

Looking for primary source material? The Past Masters database includes full-text electronic editions of primary source materials in religion, philosophy, political thought and theory, education, classics, and more.  Featured authors that might interest Divinity students are Thomas Aquinas, Augustine of Hippo, Anselm of Canterbury, Peter Lombard, and more. The database allows you to browse/read full texts online, or to search a collection by keyword. (For example, you could select the collection of Augustine’s writings and search “baptism” or “lord’s supper” to bring up places where these words appear in his treatises or sermons.) See our full tutorial for using this database here.

 

9. The Loeb Classical Library

The beautiful red- and green-covered sets in the Divinity School Library’s Reference Room are also available online through the Loeb Classical Library.  The search function for this database is notoriously cumbersome, but you can always select the “Browse Authors” option to take you to an alphabetical list of authors, from which you can pull up the full text of individual volumes with facing English and Greek/Latin pages.

 

10. Library of Latin Texts Series A (and Series B)

The Library of Latin texts. Series A and the Library of Latin texts. Series B reproduce a massive amount of Latin literature (including early and medieval Christian literature) for online reading and searching. If you use any of the Corpus Christianorum series for your work, this online database helpfully reproduces many of those editions. From the main page, you can search by Author, Title, or Keyword, or you can go to the Table of Contents and browse by letter of the alphabet.  Selecting “A” under the Table of Contents, for example, will bring up any author (and some titles) that begin with the letter A. Looking for Albertus Magnus? LLT-B has links to a dozen of his texts, including his commentary on Lombard’s Sentences.

 

11. Tools for Studying the Hebrew Bible

This site, put together by Duke’s own Professor Marc Brettler (Judaic Studies; Department of Religious Studies), gathers resources for learning the specialized discipline of studying Hebrew texts.  Dr. Brettler has put together glossaries (English to Hebrew and Hebrew to English) that introduce students to major terms important for understanding the critical apparatus (i.e., the notes at the bottom of the page) of a scholarly edition of the Hebrew Bible.  He also gives helpful introductions to different editions of the text, lexica, grammars, concordances, and more. For those interested in taking a deep dive into exegesis of the Hebrew text, this site provides an invaluable set of resources to get you started.

 

12. The Digital Karl Barth Library

Looking for Karl Barth’s writings specifically? The Digital Karl Barth Library gathers the massive The Church Dogmatics(Die kirchliche Dogmatik) in English and German versions, as well as the first 45 volumes of Barth’s Gesamtausgabe (including letters, sermons, etc.).

 

13. ProQuest Central

ProQuest Central is another massive online database, but this one has a focus on bringing together full texts of newspapers. Are you looking for contemporary coverage of historical events? Popular attitudes toward a certain event or cultural group or trend? ProQuest Central is a great way to browse for a topic in local, national, and international newspapers.

Database Highlight: Past Masters

Are you taking a seminar on the thought of St. Augustine this fall and looking for an easy way to get broad, searchable access to his writings? Are you curious about the theological writings of Anselm, Lombard, or Aquinas? Want to flip through Jane Austen’s letters, or Søren Kierkegaard’s journals, or learn about the Blue Stockings Society’s advocacy of women’s education and literacy in 18th-century England?

The Past Masters database includes full-text electronic editions of primary source materials in religion, philosophy, political thought and theory, education, classics, and more. Think it could be useful for your research? Here’s how to get started:

 

Step 1: In the Divinity Library catalog, search “Intelex Past Masters.” Your first result will look like this:

Select “View Online” to navigate to the database’s main page.

 

Step 2: Begin searching!

You can search the entire database using the SEARCH box in the left-hand menu, or you can select a title from the alphabetized list in order to navigate directly to a particular author’s works. Let’s say you want to learn more about Augustine’s writings. In that case, select the link for “Augustine: Works.”

 

 

Step 3:  Once you’ve brought up Augustine: Works, focus on the left-hand menu.

There are two main ways to search within a collection like Augustine’s writings: broadly through the whole collection, or within individual volumes/works. Both of these search strategies make use of the left-hand menu. Notice that the SEARCH box is still present at the top, but specifies its search parameters within the collection of Augustine’s writings. Further down, you’ll begin to see titles of Augustine’s works linked in the grey boxes. This is how you would select a specific individual title to read or search online.

 

Step 4: Example search: collection-wide. Let’s say you want to learn more about Augustine’s thinking on the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper. Using the SEARCH box, enter keywords that have to do with the Lord’s Supper: for example, you might run searches for “communion”, “Eucharist”, or “bread and wine”. Here’s what happens when you search for “Eucharist”: the database finds hits within 38 of the 41 available volumes of Augustine’s writings! The volumes will then appear in order of relevance. Coming in first place with 39 separate hits is Augustine’s Sermons (184-229Z) on the Liturgical Seasons. Here’s a peek at the result list:

Notice that you get minimal context surrounding each occurrence of your search term. This can help you narrow down which hits will actually be helpful to your specific research question.

 

Step 5: Ready to see one of your hits in the broader context of Augustine’s writings? One thing to be aware of: your search will bring up results in the main body of Augustine’s text, but it will also bring up results in the titles, subtitles, and footnotes. Some of these will be useful, but many you’ll want to cross off your list quickly. How to go about this? Notice that each occurrence of your search term is in bold scarlet print. These are hyperlinks connected to the place in the volume where the term appears. Select any line to get started. Here’s an example of where you’ll be taken in the larger text:

Once again, your search term is highlighted in scarlet. Also, notice there are arrows before and after the search term. These allow you to navigate quickly forward or backward through your search results without returning to the main results page. This can be very helpful, especially if you get several results in a row that are irrelevant or take you to occurrences of your search term in the translator’s footnotes.

 

Step 6: Okay, we’ve found some good stuff. How do we cite it? Let’s look at the left-hand menu again.

Notice the option, right under the SEARCH box, to “Export a Citation.” This will pull up a citation for you in plain text, or, if you use a citation management program like EndNote, you can select an option that exports the citation to that program. Prefer to cite the print version of the text? Notice the title, volume, and part of the text you wish to cite. For example, “The Confessions I/1” means the volume title is The Confessions, the volume number is I, and the part number is 1. The print series is located on the Divinity Library’s BQ-BR level, starting at  BR 65  .A5   E53   1990.

German for Reading

There’s no sense shielding you from the awful truth. You might as well know.

German is a very difficult language to learn.

Or had you already figured that out? If you had, you are in good company: no less an American dignitary than Mark Twain agreed with you. In fact, while you’re procrastinating from learning German, you might read his brilliant essay, “The Awful German Language.”

Many academics have felt the same way. And yet, for various reasons — whether to read a source in the original, or to follow modern academic scholarship, or to pass muster before a committee — these academics have persisted in trying to teach themselves German. They have persisted despite separable prefixes, distant verbs, and the syntactical pattern Twain accurately described as “Parenthesis distemper.”

So how have these giants of academia past overcome the hurdle that is German? Some of the popular strategies of learning and practicing the language include:

  • auditing a class in the German department
  • taking a summer course in German for Reading
  • bringing a German Bible along to worship services and following the Scripture reading
  • watching films with German audio and/or subtitles
  • listening to lessons from the Pimsleur German language program
  • finding an introductory grammar text and buckling down
  • lots and lots of flashcards — pre-made or home-made

Regardless of the strategy that most appeals to you, learning a new language is likely to be a long and difficult road. At the Divinity Library, we want you to have everything you need to build good habits for studying German. So we’ve added a permanent Reserve collection for German resources. Here are the items you can borrow:

Three-hour loan:

  • Introduction to Theological German: a beginner’s course for theological students, by J. D. Manton
  • Modern Theological German: a reader and dictionary, by Helmut W. Ziefle

Two-week loan:

  • Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen (HP 1), by Joanne K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter und die Kammer des Schreckens (HP 2), by Joanne K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter und der Gefangene von Askaban (HP 3), by Joanne K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter und der Feuerkelch (HP 4), by Joanne K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter und der Orden des Phönix (HP 5), by Joanne K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter und der Halbblutprinz (HP 6), by Joanne K. Rowling
  • Harry Potter und die Heiligtümer des Todes (HP 7), by Joanne K. Rowling

Ask for any of these titles at the circulation desk to get started on (or continue!) your German adventure. And be sure to let us know when you pass your exam!

Prost!

Summer 2018 Reading Suggestions

Ah, summer… Long days, warm temperatures, and far too many mosquitoes.

Let’s go back inside and read!

Wherever you find yourself this summer, we at the Divinity Library hope you are getting an opportunity to rest and recharge, and rediscover the joy of reading without the pressure of class deadlines. To that end, what follows is a short list of recommendations for summer reading, compiled with the help of the faculty and staff at Duke Divinity School. Happy reading!

Novels:

C. S. Lewis, Till We Have Faces

George Eliot, Adam Bede

Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See

Walter M. Miller, Jr., A Canticle for Leibowitz

 

Spiritual Writings:

Howard Thurman, Meditations of the Heart

Pauli Murray: selected sermons and writings

 

Essays and Stories:

Wendell Berry, The art of loading brush: new agrarian writings

 

History:

Judith Herrin, Byzantium: the surprising life of a medieval empire

Philip P. Hallie, Lest Innocent Blood be Shed: the story of the village of Le Chambon and how goodness happened there

Harry S. Stout, Upon the altar of the nation: a moral history of the American Civil War

 

What else have you been reading this summer? Let us know in the comments!