Welcome to the CS-Ed Podcast

Welcome to The CS-Ed podcast, hosted by Dr. Kristin Stephens-Martinez at Duke University. This is a podcast where we talk about teaching computer science, with computer science educators, to learn about teaching and classroom management. Find all of our episodes here, along with transcripts and helpful links!

Be sure to follow us on Twitter and FaceBook, and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.

Season 2 Episode 6: Large Flipped CS1

Summary

For this season’s last episode, we talk with Jacqueline Smith, an Assistant Professor of the teaching stream in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. We talk about U of T’s large flipped CS1. We started with the class’s specifics, how it’s flipped, and their “prepare, rehearse, and perform” cycle. Then we discussed their decision to have a synchronous part of the class despite remote teaching. We spent the rest of the episode on her thoughts on how best to flip a class, which included reconsidering if video is the right medium, flipping doesn’t need to happen all at once, and colleague buy-in from all others that could teach the course is important.

You can find this episode’s transcription down below!

Listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

You can also download the episode directly.

Be sure to follow us on social media! You can find us on Twitter and Facebook!

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Season 2 Episode 5: Systemic Change

Summary

In this episode, we talk to Leigh Ann DeLyser, co-founder and executive director of CSforAll. Our topic is the need to reform systems for sustainable equity. We discuss what it means and what CSforAll does. We also discussed the specific difficulties our host, Kristin Stephens-Martinez, has with her CS1 class and how it’s actually a systems problem.

You can find this episode’s transcription down below!

Listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

You can also download the episode directly.

Be sure to follow us on social media! You can find us on Twitter and Facebook!

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Season 2 Episode 4: Grading for Equity

Summary

Joining us today is Joe Feldman, author of Grading for Equity and the CEO of Crescendo Education Group. We discuss the historical overview of grading and why now is a good time to rethink our grading process to make it more equitable. We got concrete by discussing our host’s, Kristin Stephens-Martinez’s, syllabus for her class and changes she was considering after reading Grading for Equity. One significant point Joe made is that grades should only convey the student’s level of mastery, not their behavior. Finally, we closed the episode with him pointing out we should do small experiments, iterate, and over time transition our classes to be more equitable, as well as discussed ways to normalize the new practices in the classroom. If you are interested in learning more, there is not only the book but also an online class.

You can find this episode’s transcription down below!

Listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

You can also download the episode directly.

Be sure to follow us on social media! You can find us on Twitter and Facebook!

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Season 2 Episode 3: Cultural Competence in Computer Science

Summary

In this episode, we talk with Nicki Washington, a full Professor of the Practice at Duke University, about cultural competence. We discuss the definition of cultural competence. Its history, why we should care, and what it means in the context of computer science. We also talked about Nicki’s new class on this topic and her 3C Fellows program. Finally, we close with a call to action. Many people and organizations have started learning, reading, and making commitments. What needs to happen next is to start executing plans and iterating on them quickly (agile method style). We need to hold people accountable because reading and planning aren’t enough. Our discussion did not close with a too long; didn’t listen segment, except simply “get uncomfortable and listen to the whole episode.”

Nicki mentioned many resources during our discussion. We have done our best to link to them in the transcript.

You can find this episode’s transcription down below!

Listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

You can also download the episode directly.

Be sure to follow us on social media! You can find us on Twitter and Facebook!

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Season 2 Episode 2: What K12 and Higher Ed CS can learn from each other

Summary

Our guest today is Jared O’Leary, the Director of Education and Research at BootUp PD. Jared creates computer science curriculum and professional development and is also the creator of the CSK8 podcast. Our topic was what K–12 and higher education computer science education can learn from each other. We discussed Jared’s philosophy and curriculum design process, as well as why K–12 and higher education do not communicate as much as would be ideal. In Jared’s too long; didn’t listen summary, Jared discussed the importance of reading and learning from outside of the field and how we need to figure out better ways to communicate and learn from each other.

You can find this episode’s transcription down below!

Listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

You can also download the episode directly here.

Be sure to follow us on social media! You can find us on Twitter and Facebook!

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Season 2 Episode 1: Supporting students of color

In this episode, we talk with Manuel Pérez-Quiñones, a Professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Our topic is supporting students of color. We discussed why this support matters and the differences between professors versus students and equality versus equity. We also discussed how he changed his grading practices for his remote class. He even shared about changing his syllabus to specification grading, which he reflects on in his blog now that the semester is over. For his too long; didn’t listen summary, Manuel talked about how we need to acknowledge the history that got us here and what is happening right now and then consider the repercussions that appear in our classroom.

You can find this episode’s transcription down below!

Listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

You can also download the episode directly here.

Be sure to follow us on social media! You can find us on Twitter and Facebook!

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Season 2: Where should we go from here?

We are launching season 2 of The CS-Ed Podcast on January 4th, 2021! The year 2020 has caused so much disruption and calls for change, which led us to make this season’s theme “Where should we go from here?” Join us for this season as our host, Kristin Stephens-Martinez, discusses with her guests about pedagogy and inequality in hopes it will give us all an opportunity to reflect rather than react to our present situation.

This season has 6 episodes. The first will come out on January 4th and we’ll release subsequent episodes every other Monday:

  • 1/04 – Manuel Pérez-Quiñones from University North Carolina at Charlotte on how to support students of color
  • 1/18 – Jared O’Leary from BootUp PD on what can K12 and higher education computer science learn from each other
  • 2/01 – Nicki Washington from Duke University on cultural competency
  • 2/15 – Joe Feldman joins me to talk about his book Grading for equity
  • 3/01 – Leigh Ann DeLyser from CSforAll on systemic change
  • 3/15 – Jacqueline Smith from the University of Toronto shares how to teach a large flipped class

Episode 6: Colleen Lewis

In this episode, we talk with Colleen Lewis, Associate Professor of Computer Science at Harvey Mudd College. She specializes in computer science education and diversity issues, as well as is the creator of http://csteachingtips.org/, which we at the CS-Ed Podcast post about often.

You can find this episode’s transcription down below!

Listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

You can also download the episode directly here.

Be sure to follow us on social media! You can find us on Twitter and FaceBook!

Summary

This conversation was a question and answer with Colleen. Our topics included: peer instruction, how she structures her lecture and class, how becoming a better and better teacher is a marathon, cheating on assignments, the pros and cons of splitting students based on prior experience, and where to hold office hours.

Colleen’s “something awesome in computer science” was another podcast, Modern Figures Podcast. It highlights the work of black women in computing. The audience is geared towards teenage girls interested in computer science.

Colleen’s Too Long; Didn’t Listen (TL; DL) was two tips. First, was survey your students and respond to that feedback. The second focused on how your teaching practices should allow for opportunities to see into student thinking and that’s really what active learning is meant to be.

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Episode 5: Armando Fox

In this episode, we talk with Armando Fox, Professor of Computer Science and Faculty Advisor to the MOOCLab at UC Berkeley. With David Patterson, he co-designed and co-taught Berkeley’s first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on “Engineering Software as a Service,” offered through edx.org. It is now a professional certificate in “Agile Development Using Ruby on Rails.”

You can find this episode’s transcription down below!

Listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

You can also download the episode directly here.

Be sure to follow us on social media! You can find us on Twitter and FaceBook!

Summary

Our conversation touched many topics involving MOOCs. We discussed the history of MOOCs, how he got into it, creating Small Private Online Courses (SPOCs), how MOOCs call into question established teaching habits, some experiments he’s planning that break those habits, and how to get student buy-in when using a MOOC in the classroom.

When asked about something awesome in computer science, Armando talked about his love for the history of computing. One thing he observed is how much ideas get recycled in computer science. He even has a web page called “Master geek theater” of his recommended documentaries ranging from five minutes to three hours.

Armando’s Too Long; Didn’t Listen (TL; DL) focused on MOOCs’ long-term legacy. He does not think they will replace instructors. Instead, they will enable instructors to use their time more creatively because they have well-curated, interactive, battle-tested exercises available to them. Moreover, they will help us think about how to get the non-deep content experts involved in helping the students or their peers in learning the material.

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Episode 4: Mark Guzdial

In this episode, we talk with Mark Guzdial, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, with a courtesy appointment in the School of Information at the University of Michigan.

You can find this episode’s transcription down below!

Listen to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

You can also download the episode directly here.

Be sure to follow us on social media! You can find us on Twitter and FaceBook!

Summary

Our conversation focused on live coding, which is programming in front of the class as the students would program. Mark emphasized that the most essential part of live coding is modeling process. The second part is modeling how to manage mistakes. And the third is to create opportunities for students to make predictions.

For his “something awesome in computer science,” Mark talked about how he loved that computer science can be anything else. That computer science can look like and behave like any other discipline.

Mark’s Too Long; Didn’t Listen (TL; DL) broadened our original conversation by pointing out that, while live coding is useful, it’s one method among many and not necessarily the most important one. Other teaching methods he thought were also important included peer instruction, contextualized computing education, and generally, to start with a problem.

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