September 15, 2017

Speaker Reports

Burde on Benton “Legal Logic of Conquest”

Lauren Benton’s article, “The Legal Logic of Conquest: Political Pluralism, Truces, and Early Modern Colonial Violence[1],” the concept of imperial powers – both governments and corporations – developing international law, examines the evolution of political and legal pluralism through colonial conquests. The application of pluralism and its impacts shapes how a sovereign power approaches a Read more about Burde on Benton “Legal Logic of Conquest”[…]

Bottom-Up Approach to Comparative History

Professor Lauren Benton (Vanderbilt, History and Law) spoke at Duke as the inaugural guest in the Mellon Sawyer Seminar speakers’ series being hosted at the University this year. Benton is a distinguished scholar whose work cuts across history, law, and anthropology. Her work specifically focuses on the history of international law, and the history of Read more about Bottom-Up Approach to Comparative History[…]

The Corporation in Conquest: Reflections on the Methodology of Legal History

The inaugural seminar of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law took place on Friday, September 22nd with Professor Lauren Benton speaking about her paper “The Legal Logic of Conquest: Political Pluralism, Truces, and Early Modern Colonial Violence.” The discussion was thought-provoking and wide-ranging, covering a variety of topics extending from the legal relationship Read more about The Corporation in Conquest: Reflections on the Methodology of Legal History[…]

Benton and “Pluri-political Formations”

Last Friday, Professor Lauren Benton came to speak at the Mellon Sawyer Seminar about her upcoming paper, “The Legal Logic of Conquest: Political Pluralism, Truces, and Early Modern Colonial Violence.” In her opening remarks, Benton discussed the method she used in writing “The Legal Logic of Conquest,” and Rage for Order: The British Empire and Read more about Benton and “Pluri-political Formations”[…]

Walburn, Benton and the Legal Logic of Conquest

In her recent article, “The legal Logic of Conquest: Political Pluralism, Truces, and Early Modern Colonial Violence,” Lauren Benton reworks our understandings of conquest, and revises modern legal historiography, arguing that “the history of the early modern world can be styled as a history of invasion, occupation, and the sweeping cultural and institutional consequences of Read more about Walburn, Benton and the Legal Logic of Conquest[…]

The Decategorization of Conquest

Lauren Benton’s career has spanned an impressive range of disciplines—and it is that diversity which makes her paper uniquely valuable in the inaugural Sawyer Seminar. As a legal historian with training in anthropology and economics, Benton’s paper, “The Legal Logic of Conquest: Political Pluralism, Truces, and Early Modern Colonial Violence”, focuses on the commonalities of Read more about The Decategorization of Conquest[…]

Ng on Benton, “The Legal Logic of Conquest”

On Friday, September 22nd, Professor Lauren Benton spoke as the first guest of the Seminar on Corporations and International Law. The seminar discussed her recent paper “The Legal Logic of Conquest: Political Pluralism, Truces, and Early Modern Colonial Violence” as well as her co-authored book, A Rage for Order: The British Empire and the Origins Read more about Ng on Benton, “The Legal Logic of Conquest”[…]

Burde on Turner, “The Poetics of the Corporate Person”

Comparing Henry Turner’s article, “The Poetics of the Corporate Person,” with his book The Corporate Commonwealth – Pluralism and Political Fictions in England, 1516 – 1651, it becomes evident that Turner views and analyzes corporations through a unique lens. In his article, Turner highlights the term “group person,” and during the seminar discussion, he further Read more about Burde on Turner, “The Poetics of the Corporate Person”[…]

Henry S. Turner and Corporate Ontology

On October 6th, 2017, Professor Henry S. Turner of Rutgers University presented at the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law at Duke University. Professor Turner presented on his paper “The Poetics of the Corporate Person,” and his book The Corporate Commonwealth: Pluralism and Political Fictions in England 1516-1651. The main thrust of the presentation Read more about Henry S. Turner and Corporate Ontology[…]

Deardorff on Turner, “Corporate Values”

On Friday, October 6th, Henry Turner, Professor of English at Rutgers University, spoke as the second guest of the Seminar on Corporations and International Law. He discussed a portion of his forthcoming paper, The Poetics of the Corporate Person, which is an extension of his most recent book, The Corporate Commonwealth: Pluralism and Political Functions Read more about Deardorff on Turner, “Corporate Values”[…]

Turner and the Corporate Personality: Conceptualizing the Group-Person

What is the nature of the fictitious body of the corporation? According to Henry S. Turner, who visited Duke University’s Smith Warehouse on last Friday, October 6th, a corporation is little more than a group-person, come together to achieve a joint purpose.  Although we often conceive of corporations as little more than the joint-stock enterprises Read more about Turner and the Corporate Personality: Conceptualizing the Group-Person[…]

Revisiting Corporate Ontology to Upend the Status Quo

Henry S. Turner addresses his myriad concerns through the prism of the corporation’s ontology. On October 6, 2017, the professor of English literature joined the Duke Seminar on Corporations & International Law to voice those concerns and share his unique view of the corporation. More specifically, he came to explain and hear feedback on his Read more about Revisiting Corporate Ontology to Upend the Status Quo[…]

Veni, Vidi, Vici: Puig and Welker on Big Tobacco Litigation, Culture, and Regulation

For the third session of the guest speaker series, two scholars presented on the topic of international tobacco corporations tangling with national populations and international regulation. Sergio Puig shared accounts of recent legal developments in national tobacco litigation and international health regulation, while Marina Welker presented an anthropological piece on cigarette culture in Indonesia. Puig Read more about Veni, Vidi, Vici: Puig and Welker on Big Tobacco Litigation, Culture, and Regulation[…]

Kretek Capitalism & Tobacco Litigation: Welker & Puig on how Tobacco’s Proponents Attempt to Defeat Tobacco Control Measures

On October 20th the third iteration of the Seminar on Corporations & International Law’s Guest Speaker Series welcomed Professor Marina Welker of Cornell University and Professor Sergio Puig of the University of Arizona to present on the topic of tobacco control measures. Professor Welker, an anthropologist, detailed her experiences studying the role of tobacco in Read more about Kretek Capitalism & Tobacco Litigation: Welker & Puig on how Tobacco’s Proponents Attempt to Defeat Tobacco Control Measures[…]

Whose responsibility? : A Discussion With Sergio Puig and Marina Welker on the Complexities of International Tobacco Regulation

Regulatory divergences between jurisdictions complicate the realm of international law, becoming even more complex when corporate actors are added into the equation. The study of international tobacco regulation clearly demonstrates these challenges, particularly the way in which the corporation can manipulate its power to advance self-interests. On October 20th, 2017, Duke University’s Mellon Sawyer Seminar Read more about Whose responsibility? : A Discussion With Sergio Puig and Marina Welker on the Complexities of International Tobacco Regulation[…]

Puig & Welker: Navigating International Tobacco Regulation

Sergio Puig and Marina Welker were the guests of the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law speaker series on Friday, October 20. Members of the seminar course and faculty from the university convened in Smith Warehouse, a former tobacco warehouse, to discuss international tobacco regulation. In fact, the location of the meeting came Read more about Puig & Welker: Navigating International Tobacco Regulation[…]

Scholars discuss the challenges for regulating tobacco in the courtroom and real world

International laws have been strengthening the regulation over tobacco control. But the suits brought by Philip Morris International (PMI) against tobacco regulations, as well as the sluggish improvement in the regulatory environment in Indonesia demonstrate that these regulations are facing serious challenges in both the courtroom and real world, from multiple interested parties including corporations, Read more about Scholars discuss the challenges for regulating tobacco in the courtroom and real world[…]

Kretek Capitalism & Tobacco Tactics: Influence, Narratives, and Regulation

The third meeting of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law welcomed Professor Marina Welker, of Cornell University, and Professor Sergio Puig, of the University of Arizona’s James E. Rogers College of Law, to Durham on October 20, 2017. The two scholars, while hailing from the different fields of anthropology and law, both addressed Read more about Kretek Capitalism & Tobacco Tactics: Influence, Narratives, and Regulation[…]

Examining the Relationship Between States & Corporations Through the Lens of Territoriality

On Friday, November 3, 2017, Joshua Barkan and David Ciepley were the guests of the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law. Barkan and Ciepley were the first guests of the seminar to explicitly bring together its two named subjects: corporations and international law. Barkan, a geographer at the University of Georgia, discussed his Read more about Examining the Relationship Between States & Corporations Through the Lens of Territoriality[…]

Two Opposing Visions of Corporate Sovereignty

On November 3rd Joshua Barkan and David Ciepley presented their papers at the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law on corporate sovereignty and its relationship to international law. Both papers shared the same thematic emphasis on how corporate power is manifested and maintained in relation to state power, and how the two can even Read more about Two Opposing Visions of Corporate Sovereignty[…]

Walburn on Barkan and Ciepley

This week Joshua Barkan and David Ciepley came to discuss corporate sovereignty. Both of these scholars noted how corporations function as an alternative modality of sovereign governance. Barkan explained that corporations act in relation to, different than, and in tension with states. As a geographer, he is especially interested in the territorial aspects of corporate Read more about Walburn on Barkan and Ciepley[…]

DiSalvo on Barkan and Ciepley

On November 3rd, 2017, Professor Joshua Barkan of the University of Georgia and Professor David Ciepley of the University of Denver presented Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law at Duke University. Together, they broadly presented on the topic of corporations and sovereignty. Professor Ciepley specifically discussed his working paper Three Corporate Ages and the Read more about DiSalvo on Barkan and Ciepley[…]

Ciepley and Barkan on Territoriality

Last Friday in the Mellon Sawyer Seminar, Joshua Barkan and David Ciepley came to discuss their upcoming articles. In his paper, “Property and Sovereignty: Political Territoriality and the Corporate Control of Land,” Barkan explored the connection between territoriality and sovereign power. In his paper, he used the U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s leasing of land Read more about Ciepley and Barkan on Territoriality[…]

Khalid on Barkan and Ciepley, “Corporate Sovereignty”

Joshua Barkan and David Ciepley visited the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law on Friday, November 3, 2017 to discuss the topic of corporate sovereignty. Barkan discussed his ideas regarding corporate sovereignty through the framework of his paper Property and Sovereignty: Political Territoriality and the Corporate Control of Land. Ciepley addressed his position Read more about Khalid on Barkan and Ciepley, “Corporate Sovereignty”[…]

Stewart on Barkan and Ciepley

Joshua Barkan, Associate Professor of Geography at the University of Georgia, and David Ciepley, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Denver, joined us for the fourth meeting of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law at Duke University this past Friday, November 3, 2017.  Each professor presented on a paper they Read more about Stewart on Barkan and Ciepley[…]

Addressing Corporate Sovereigns As Foreign Policy Actors: A Conversation With Steve Coll On ExxonMobil’s “Private Empire”

Throughout the speaker series in the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law, the cohort has continuously questioned the implications that arise when corporations wield more power than governments. Through a conversation on November 7th with Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Steve Coll, this conversation continued with a particular focus on multinational corporations essentially adopting their Read more about Addressing Corporate Sovereigns As Foreign Policy Actors: A Conversation With Steve Coll On ExxonMobil’s “Private Empire”[…]

Steve Coll Presents Keynote at the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law at Duke University

On Tuesday, November 7, 2017 the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law at Duke University welcomed Pulitzer-prize winning New Yorker Journalist and Dean of the Columbia Journalism School Steve Coll to give the seminar’s keynote lecture. More than 150 people filled the lecture hall in Rubenstein Library to hear Coll speak on the Read more about Steve Coll Presents Keynote at the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law at Duke University[…]

Khalid on Coll, “The World According to Exxon Mobil”

Steve Coll visited the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law on Friday, November 7, 2017, to deliver the seminar’s keynote titled “The World According to Exxon Mobil.” Coll currently serves as the dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism as well as a staff writer for The New Yorker. Coll has Read more about Khalid on Coll, “The World According to Exxon Mobil”[…]

Steve Coll discusses “the World according to ExxonMobil”

“ExxonMobil does not make decisions based on what is good for the U.S. It makes decisions based on what is good for its stakeholders.” Steve Coll, the Dean and Henry R. Luce Professor at the Columbia Journalism School, as well as the author of “Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power,” spoke about ExxonMobil’s past and Read more about Steve Coll discusses “the World according to ExxonMobil”[…]

ExxonMobil Private Empire

The Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law welcomed keynote speaker, Steve Coll to Duke for a talk on “The World According to ExxonMobil.” Coll is Dean and Henry R. Luce Professor of Journalism at Columbia University’s Journalism School, staff writer at The New Yorker, and the author of the book Private Empire: ExxonMobil Read more about ExxonMobil Private Empire[…]

Deardorff on Press and Fitzmaurice, “Capitalism and Sovereign Rights”

On Friday, November 17, 2017, Steven Press, Associate Professor of History at Stanford University, and Andrew Fitzmaurice, a Professor of History at the University of Sydney, presented their works on corporations and colonization to the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law. Both professors’ works focused on the late 19th and early 20th centuries Read more about Deardorff on Press and Fitzmaurice, “Capitalism and Sovereign Rights”[…]

Fitzmaurice and Press on the Micro and Macro History of the Scramble for Africa

On November 17th, Duke University hosted two scholars of empire, Andrew Fitzmaurice and Stephen Press.  The two focus on the same historical moment, namely the scramble for Africa and ensuing colonization by both sovereign states and corporate-sovereigns.  However, beyond the historical moment the two scholars diverge drastically.  Fitzmaurice focuses on micro histories of the individuals Read more about Fitzmaurice and Press on the Micro and Macro History of the Scramble for Africa[…]

Fitzmaurice and Press on Imperial Administration and International Law

              This week, Professors Steven Press and Andrew Fitzmaurice presented their research to the seminar. Professors Press and Fitzmaurice utilized diverse approaches to explore the field of  international law and corporate governance in the age of European imperialism. In doing so, both professors focused on very specific facets within this broad field of legal history.                Professor Press provided insight Read more about Fitzmaurice and Press on Imperial Administration and International Law[…]

Individual Motivations and the Shaping of International Law

On November 17, 2017, Professors Andrew Fitzmaurice and Steven Press joined the Duke Seminar on Corporations & International Law to discuss their current scholarly interests. Professor Fitzmaurice revealed his work on a forthcoming manuscript about the lives of international lawyer Sir Travers Twiss and his wife, Pharailde van Lynseele. He characterized his work as a Read more about Individual Motivations and the Shaping of International Law[…]

Varying Lenses for History: Fitzmaurice and Press Discuss Corporations and Sovereignty

The presentations and subsequent discussions by Steven Press and Andrew Fitzmaurice on November 17, 2017 were welcome additions to the penultimate Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and Internal Law. The contributions by each served to advance the audience’s understanding of issues ranging from the relationship between states and corporations, the balance of public and private Read more about Varying Lenses for History: Fitzmaurice and Press Discuss Corporations and Sovereignty[…]

Costa on Fitzmaurice and Press

This week we hosted Andrew Fitzmaurice and Stephen Press, both interested in the recognition of the Congo Free State at the Berlin Conference. Both acknowledged this moment as the “resurrection” of corporate sovereignty after a long period of dormancy under liberalism. Press came to the question from an interest in German imperialism and in why Read more about Costa on Fitzmaurice and Press[…]

What brings scholars to their subjects? Scholars Discuss Their Intellectual Trajectories

One of the pleasures of attending the 2017-2018 Sawyer Seminar speaker series at Duke over the past three months has been to hear what circumstances, intellectual or otherwise, has pushed guest scholars to think about the intersections of corporations and international law. This was especially true for last week’s session, which featured the works of Read more about What brings scholars to their subjects? Scholars Discuss Their Intellectual Trajectories[…]

John Locke Inc.: Professor David Armitage’s Thoughts on an Unexplored Aspect of An Intellectual Giant

On December 1st, the final iteration of the fall portion of the Seminar on Corporations & International Law’s Guest Speaker Series welcomed an especially distinguished guest, Professor David Armitage of Harvard University. Professor Armitage, the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History, is the author of innumerable works including the award winning “The Ideological Origins of Read more about John Locke Inc.: Professor David Armitage’s Thoughts on an Unexplored Aspect of An Intellectual Giant[…]

Stewart on Armitage, “John Locke, Inc.”

David Armitage, Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History at Harvard University, joined us for this semester’s final meeting of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law at Duke University this past Friday, December 1, 2017.  He presented on a paper that he had prepared for the seminar, then took questions Read more about Stewart on Armitage, “John Locke, Inc.”[…]

Ng on Armitage, “John Locke, Inc.”

On December 1st, 2017, David Armitage, the Lloyd Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University, led the final meeting of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law. In preparation for the discussion, Professor Armitage had written the paper – “John Locke, Inc.,” a study on Locke’s relevance in study of corporations. This paper was Read more about Ng on Armitage, “John Locke, Inc.”[…]

How to do History with Professor Armitage

The final Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law on December 1st, 2017, brought David Armitage, the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University, to Duke University. In preparation for the presentation and discussion, Professor Armitage prepared a short draft of an article titled John Locke Inc. The paper sought to engage John Read more about How to do History with Professor Armitage[…]

Locke on Corporations: Corpus, Corporeality, & Relation to Corporation

The final fall meeting of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law welcomed Professor David Armitage, of Harvard University, to Durham on December 1, 2017. Professor Armitage presented on two short pieces, one a commentary recently published in Itinerario, and the other, titled John Locke, Inc., drafted specifically for the seminar. While introducing his Read more about Locke on Corporations: Corpus, Corporeality, & Relation to Corporation[…]

Looking Forward and Back: Two Approaches to Solving State-Centrism

On Friday, February 2, 2018, the Duke University Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law welcomed two scholars, Erika George, Professor of Law and Co-Director Center for Global Justice at the University of Utah, and Natasha Wheatley, Assistant Professor in Modem European History at Princeton University, to present their papers at an interdisciplinary academic workshop, Read more about Looking Forward and Back: Two Approaches to Solving State-Centrism[…]

Telo on George and Wheatley “From Habsburg to the Internet: the Fluidity of International Law across Time and Place”

The Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law held its first spring talk last Friday on February 2, 2018. University of Utah’s Professor Erika George and Princeton University’s Professor Natasha Wheatley kicked off the spring visiting scholar series by discussing how international law has, and continues to, adapt to emerging participants in the international sphere. Read more about Telo on George and Wheatley “From Habsburg to the Internet: the Fluidity of International Law across Time and Place”[…]

The Theory and Practice of International Law: from WWI to Facebook’s Empire

In the most recent installment of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law, Erica George of the University of Utah College of Law, and Natasha Wheatly of The Princeton History Department presented their recent work. Professor George’s paper, “Protecting Human Rights Through Rankings and Reporting,” examined the potential for ranking mechanisms to set more Read more about The Theory and Practice of International Law: from WWI to Facebook’s Empire[…]

Yang on George and Wheatley, “Corporate Rights and Responsibilities: Past and Present”

The first guest speaker session of the spring semester of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporation and International Law on February 2, 2018 welcomed Professor Erika George, of the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law, and Professor Natasha Wheatley, of Princeton University. The two scholars addressed the issue of the intersection between corporations, international Read more about Yang on George and Wheatley, “Corporate Rights and Responsibilities: Past and Present”[…]

Ranade on George and Wheatley: Whose rights are them anyway?

Chinese journalist Shi Tao was jailed for a decade for ‘divulging state secrets’ because he sent a yahoomail about state restrictions on local journalists to the US-based Asia Democracy Foundation. Human rights activists blamed Yahoo!’s local subsidiary for assisting the Chinese government in tracking down Tao; and accused the internet giant of being complicit with Read more about Ranade on George and Wheatley: Whose rights are them anyway?[…]

Hughes on George and Wheatley, “Corporate Rights and Responsibilities: Past and Present”

To kick off the Spring 2018 semester of the Mellon Sawyer Seminar Guest Lectures, Natasha Wheatley, Professor of History at Princeton University, and Erika George, Professor at the University of Utah College of Law, presented papers on Friday, February 2nd, 2018.  Both papers discussed the role of non-state entities in international law. George began by Read more about Hughes on George and Wheatley, “Corporate Rights and Responsibilities: Past and Present”[…]

Understanding Corporate Legal Personhood: Past and Present

On Friday, February 2, the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law welcomed Professor Erika George of the University of Utah College of Law, and Professor Natasha Wheatley of Princeton University for a two-hour roundtable discussion on issues ranging from the history of corporate legal personhood to the responsibilities of business enterprises to respect Read more about Understanding Corporate Legal Personhood: Past and Present[…]

Edwards on George and Wheatley: “Corporate Rights and Responsibilities: Past and Present”

For the first installment of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law on February 2, 2018, Professor Erika George from the S.J. Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah was joined by Princeton University’s Professor Natasha Wheatley. Both scholars dealt with the past, present, and future role of non-state actors in the Read more about Edwards on George and Wheatley: “Corporate Rights and Responsibilities: Past and Present”[…]

Pasekoff on Richman’s Stateless Commerce

The speaker for the February 23, 2018 session of Corporations and International Law, Spring Semester 2018, was Barak Richman, the Edgar P. and Elizabeth C. Bartlett Professor of Law, and Professor of Business Administration at Duke University.  Professor Richman was discussing his recent book Stateless Commerce.  For this session, the highlighted reading selections were the Read more about Pasekoff on Richman’s Stateless Commerce[…]

Yang on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”

On February 23, 2018, the second guest speaker session of the spring semester of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporation and International Law welcomed Professor Barak Richman, the Edgar P. and Elizabeth C. Bartlett Professor of Law and Professor of Business Administration at Duke University. During the session, he discussed his book, Stateless Commerce, and answered Read more about Yang on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”[…]

Ranade on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”

  If a casual tourist is excited to see hot-shot bankers and lawyers bustle around Manhattan, New York City will present her with plenty of dark suits in all their glory. However, if she were to stumble upon 47th street, she might feel teleported to the 19th century by walking amidst scores of full-bearded Orthodox Read more about Ranade on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”[…]

Glover on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”

On Friday, February 23rd, 2018 as a participant in the Spring 2018 Mellon Sawyer Seminar Guest Lectures, Barak Richman, Professor of Contracts and Antitrust at Duke University School of Law, presented his recently published novel entitled Stateless Commerce: The Diamond Network and the Persistance of Relational Exchange. His presentation focused upon chapters six and seven Read more about Glover on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”[…]

King on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”

On Friday, February 23, the second spring speaker session for Sawyer Seminar on Corporation and International Law hosted Professor Barak Richman to discuss his new book, Stateless Commerce: The Diamond Network and the Persistence of Relational Exchange. Professor Richman is the Edgar P. and Elizabeth C. Bartlett Professor of Law and Professor of Business Administration Read more about King on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”[…]

Lukasiewicz on Richman, Stateless Commerce

On February 23, 2018, co-organizers of the Duke University Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law, professors Rachel Brewster and Philip Stern, welcomed Prof. Barak Richman for their second spring public seminar event.  Speaking as a Duke Law professor and Fuqua School of Business economist, Richman introduced some of the most interesting conclusions and theories Read more about Lukasiewicz on Richman, Stateless Commerce[…]

Durand on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”

On February 23rd, 2018, Barak Richman, the Edgar P. and Elizabeth C. Bartlett Professor of Law at Duke University joined students in the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law to discuss his most recent book entitled Stateless Commerce: The Diamond Network and the Persistence of Relational Exchange. For the purposes of the seminar, students were Read more about Durand on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”[…]

Hughes on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”

  On Friday, February 23rd, 2018, Professor Barak Richman presented his book, Stateless Commerce, as the most recent Guest Lecturer in the Mellon Sawyer Seminar Series. The book examines the self-regulating mechanisms of the diamond industry which uses relational networks based on ethnic communities in order to enforce and guarantee diamond transactions in lieu of Read more about Hughes on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”[…]

“Written by an Economist”

One theme definitely pervaded the conversation about Barak Richman’s book Stateless Commerce: The Diamond Network and the Persistence of Relational Exchange, published in 2017-namely that this book was “written by an economist, explained through the lens of efficiency.” Many of the questions asked in the seminar on Friday, February 23 pointed out potential non-economist perspectives Read more about “Written by an Economist”[…]

Voloshin on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”

Barak Richman, the Edgar P. and Elizabeth C. Bartlett Professor of Law, and Professor of Business Administration at Duke University, presented his recent work, Stateless Commerce: The Diamond Network and the Persistence of Relational Exchange at the February 23, 2018 session of Corporations and International Law. Richman’s presentation explained how ethnic trading networks operate and Read more about Voloshin on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”[…]

Edwards on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”

For the second session of the Mellon Sawyer Seminar Lectures on February 23, 2018, Duke Law’s Barak Richman, Professor of Anti-Trust and Contracts, spoke on his recently published book, Stateless Commerce: The Diamond Network and the Persistence of Relational Exchange. Professor Richman’s work has been over a decade in the making and a lecture that Read more about Edwards on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”[…]

Garrett on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”

The latest installment of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law brought Professor Barak Richman, an economist and a professor of law at Duke University, who discussed his recent book, Stateless Commerce: the Diamond Network and the Persistence of Relational Exchange. Specifically, the conversation heavily weighed on chapters 6 and 7, focusing on interactions Read more about Garrett on Richman, “Stateless Commerce”[…]

Shan on Wu: “China, Inc.”

On Friday, March 2, Professor Mark Wu from Harvard Law School visited Duke for the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on The Corporation and International Law. In addition to teaching and researching international trade law as a law professor, Wu is also involved in various international organizations, including the World Trade Organization, the World Economic Forum, and Read more about Shan on Wu: “China, Inc.”[…]

Telo on Wu, “China, Inc.”

On March 2, 2018, Harvard Law professor Mark Wu joined the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law to discuss China’s increasingly ambiguous role in the world economy. The Chinese economy features a unique organization of formal and informal synergetic links connecting public and private entities. This uniqueness has created tension in the international geopolitical Read more about Telo on Wu, “China, Inc.”[…]

A Brave New World? China, Inc. and International Law, Supranational Structures, and the Future of the Economic State

On Friday, March 1, 2018, Professor Mark Wu, of Harvard Law school, joined the Sawyer Seminar for its third guest speaker event. Prior to the event, Professor Wu shared a “thought experiment” exercise with the Sawyer Seminar students to facilitate a conversation around his larger article, The “China Inc.” Challenge to Global Trade Governance. His Read more about A Brave New World? China, Inc. and International Law, Supranational Structures, and the Future of the Economic State[…]

King on Wu, “China, Inc.”

On Friday, March 2, Professor Mark Wu from Harvard Law School came to speak as a guest speaker for the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law to discuss the unique economic structure of China, which he terms China, Inc. Professor Wu explained that international law and our global ideology about trade is a result Read more about King on Wu, “China, Inc.”[…]

Lynch on Wu, “The China, Inc. Challenge”

On March 2, 2018, the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law welcomed Professor Mark Wu of Harvard Law School for the third public seminar event of the spring. Professor Wu addressed his 2016 article, The “China, Inc.” Challenge to Global Trade Governance,[1] as well as a discussion essay he prepared for the seminar titled, Read more about Lynch on Wu, “The China, Inc. Challenge”[…]

“The China, Inc. Challenge”

On March 2, 2018, Professor Mark Wu, a Harvard law professor, joined the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law to discuss his insights on the unique economic structure of China, which he has deemed China, Inc., and its relation to international law Professor Wu began his talk with a few opening comments that framed Read more about “The China, Inc. Challenge”[…]

Choi on Wu, “China Inc.”

On Friday, March 2nd, 2018, Professor Mark Wu joined the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law to discuss China’s recent economic development and its implication on the development of future international law.   Professor Wu began the conversation by explaining that the contemporary international law and its political ideology are products of the Cold Read more about Choi on Wu, “China Inc.”[…]

Lyratzakis on Wu, “China Inc.”: Asking the right questions

On March 2, 2018, the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law welcomed Professor Mark Wu from Harvard Law School as the third speaker of the spring Seminar series. The topic of the discussion was, broadly, the modern Chinese political economy, and the extent to which the rise of the modern Chinese corporation within that Read more about Lyratzakis on Wu, “China Inc.”: Asking the right questions[…]

Fayyad on Wu, “China, Inc. and the Paradox of Blurred Lines”

On Friday, March 2, 2018, Professor Mark Wu of Harvard Law School joined the Sawyer Seminar to discuss his article, The “China Inc.” Challenge to Global Trade Governance. Wu, whose research focuses on international trade law, began his talk by challenging the audience to think through some of the hypothetical scenarios he had previously shared Read more about Fayyad on Wu, “China, Inc. and the Paradox of Blurred Lines”[…]

Stewart on Wu, “China, Inc.”

Mark Wu, Assistant Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, joined us for the latest meeting of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law this past Friday, March 2.  He discussed his paper, “China, Inc.,” as well as a thought experiment piece that he wrote in anticipation of the seminar meeting.   “China, Inc.” Read more about Stewart on Wu, “China, Inc.”[…]

Shan on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”

On Friday, March 23, Professor Gwendolyn Gordon from the Wharton School of Business at UPenn visited Duke to lead the discussion for the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on the Corporation and International Law. Professor Gordon’s academic background, as described by Professor Stern, perfectly embodies the interdisciplinary aspects of the Seminar. After obtaining a BA in psychology Read more about Shan on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”[…]

Choi on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”

Professor Gordon emphasized that she is not trying to use the Maori Corporation as an example that can be applied elsewhere. Instead, she wants us to be an example as how we can take apart our ideas of a corporation’s operation. The Maori study shows us that while corporations are people, they are also not Read more about Choi on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”[…]

Lynch on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”

On March 23, 2018 Professor Gwendolyn Gordon of the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania spoke at the fourth public event of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law.  Professor Gordon addressed her 2016 law review article, Culture in Corporate Law or: A Black Corporation, a Christian Corporation, and a Maori Read more about Lynch on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”[…]

Eible on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation” and “Culture in Corporate Law”

Professor Gwendolyn Gordon, Assistant Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, discussed her work and fielded questions from students and faculty during the March 23, 2018 meeting of the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law. Professor Gordon offered commentary on Culture in Corporate Law or: A Black Read more about Eible on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation” and “Culture in Corporate Law”[…]

Murphy on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”

On March 23, Gwen Gordon spoke to the Sawyer Seminar about her anthropological and legal scholarship regarding a case study of Maori incorporation. Gordon emphasized that the goal of her work was to provide a new way of conceiving of the corporation’s social and ethical responsibility without attempting to apply the Maori example to western Read more about Murphy on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”[…]

Lukasiewicz on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”

On March 23, 2018, co-organizers of the Duke University Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law, professors Rachel Brewster and Philip Stern, welcomed Prof. Gwendolyn Gordon from Wharton’s Legal Studies and Business Ethics department for their fourth spring public seminar event.  Prof. Gordon earned a JD from Harvard and a PhD in anthropology from Princeton, Read more about Lukasiewicz on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”[…]

Deardorff on Gordon, “Contingent Corporations and Sovereignty”

In her talk to the penultimate lecture to the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law on March 23, 2018, Professor Gwendolyn Gordon of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania spoke on her twist on the theory of the firm, using the case study of her research on Maori corporations on New Zealand’s Read more about Deardorff on Gordon, “Contingent Corporations and Sovereignty”[…]

Benenson on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”

On Friday, March 23, Professor Gwendolyn Gordon, Assistant Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business visited the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law to discuss her 2016 article, Culture in Corporate Law or: A Black Corporation, a Christian Corporation, and a Maori Corporation Walk into Read more about Benenson on Gordon, “The Contingent Corporation”[…]

Durand on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”

On Friday 13th, 2018, Professor Turkular Isiksel joined the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law to discuss her work. Isiksel, the James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum at Columbia University, began her lecture by explaining her roots. She had not started off as a scholar interested in corporations per se, but was Read more about Durand on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”[…]

Deardorff on Isiksel, “Decider of the Corporate Purpose”

In the final meeting of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law at Duke University on April 13, 2018, Turkuler Isiksel, the James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum at Columbia University, spoke to the Seminar on her work on corporations and human rights. Isiksel’s work stems from her initial interest in Read more about Deardorff on Isiksel, “Decider of the Corporate Purpose”[…]

Glover on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”

For the final gathering of the Seminar on Corporations and International Law on April 4, 2018, Professor Turkuler Isiksel, the James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum at Columbia University, joined students, faculty and guests to discuss her recent book proposal – a work-in-progress on corporate personhood and a new purposive theory of Read more about Glover on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”[…]

Cummings on “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”

Professor Turkuler Isiksel, a James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum at Columbia University, joined the Seminar on Corporations and International Law for its final class on April 4, 2018. She joined to discuss the proposal for her upcoming book and her paper titled “The Rights of Man and the Rights of the Man-Made: Read more about Cummings on “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”[…]

Eible on Isiksel, “Corporations and Human Rights” and Follow-Up Book Project

Professor Turkuler Isiksel, James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum at Columbia University, discussed her work and fielded questions from students and faculty during the April 13, 2018 meeting of the Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law. Professor Isiksel offered commentary on her The Rights of Man and the Rights of Read more about Eible on Isiksel, “Corporations and Human Rights” and Follow-Up Book Project[…]

Stewart on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”

Turkuler Isiksel, the James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum at Columbia University, joined us this past Friday, April 13, 2018, for the final meeting of the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law of the academic year.  Professor Isiksel began the meeting by summarizing some of the key ideas from the book Read more about Stewart on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”[…]

Garrett on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”

The Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law finished its yearlong discussion with Professor Turkuler Isiksel, the James P. Shenton Professor of the Core Curriculum at Columbia University, presenting a book proposal on her new purposive theory of corporate rights. Professor Isiksel, a modern political theorist, initially found scholarly fascination with the European Union and Read more about Garrett on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”[…]

Lyratzakis on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to have Rights?”

On Friday 13th, 2018, the Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law welcomed Professor Turkuler Isiksel, the James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum at Columbia University, for the last presentation of the Seminar Series. Prof. Isiksel offered a fascinating presentation of her paper “The Rights of Man and the Rights of the Man-Made: Corporations Read more about Lyratzakis on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to have Rights?”[…]

Voloshin on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”

The Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law welcomed Professor Turkuler Isiksel, the James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum at Columbia University, for its final class meeting of the semester on April 13, 2018. In this conclusory event, Professor Isiksel addressed many of the topics the Sawyer Seminar has covered throughout the Read more about Voloshin on Isiksel, “A Corporate Right to Have Rights?”[…]