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We’re excited to announce our Spring 2021 schedule! Some events are still pending scheduling, so stay tuned for even more great speakers.

 

Wealth, inequality, and health in a small-scale subsistence society

Wednesday, January 20th at 12pm EST

headshots of Adrian Jaeggi and Aaron BlackwellJoin us for a conversation with Adrian Jaeggi, Assistant Professor and Head of the Human Ecology Group at the University of Zurich Institute of Evolutionary Medicine, and Aaron Blackwell, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Washington State University. In high-income countries, relative wealth and inequality may affect health by causing psychosocial stress. We test this hypothesis in a small-scale subsistence society, the Tsimane. We associated relative household wealth and community-level wealth inequality with a range of psychosocial and health outcomes (depressive symptoms, social conflicts, non-social problems, social support, cortisol, BMI, blood pressure, self-rated health, morbidities) controlling for community mean wealth, age, sex, community size, distance to town and relevant random effects. Wealth inequality was associated with respiratory disease, the leading cause of mortality in the Tsimane. Both inequality and wealth were associated with blood pressure. However, psychosocial stress did not mediate these associations. These findings suggest effects of socio-economic hierarchies on health in any society, but that some effects are exacerbated in high-income countries. Sign up here for the meeting link.

 

Successful Aging in the Forest: How wild chimpanzees can help us understand the evolution of human aging

Thursday, January 28th at 12pm EST

headshot of Melissa Emery Thompson and a picture of a chimpanzeeJoin us for a conversation with Melissa Emery Thompson, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico. Recent research has revealed that despite shorter life expectancies, humans in small-scale subsistence populations exhibit surprisingly good health, suggesting that some debilitating diseases of aging may be novel products of industrialized environments. This research highlights an urgency to look deeper in our evolutionary past to understand how we age today. I will discuss emerging findings from the first longitudinal study to examine aging in our closest evolutionary relatives, chimpanzees, in their natural environment. Attendees may be interested in reading articles in a recent theme issue on primate aging.

After the talk, perspectives on how the research applies in a clinical setting will be presented by Arun Karlamangla, Professor of Medicine with a specialty in geriatric medicine at UCLA. Sign up here for the meeting link.

 

Club EvMed led by Christine Stabell Benn (Univ of Southern Denmark)

Thursday, February 11th at 12pm EST

Full details to be announced soon, but you can register in advance here.

 

Club EvMed led by Phil Starks (Tufts)

week of February 15th

Full details to be announced soon.

 

Club EvMed led by Robert Woods (Univ of Michigan)

Tuesday, February 23rd at 12pm EST

Full details to be announced soon, but you can register in advance here.

 

Club EvMed led by Herman Pontzer (Duke)

Tuesday, March 9th at 12pm EST

Full details to be announced soon, but you can register in advance here.

 

Club EvMed led by Sandra Breum Andersen (Univ of Copenhagen)

Thursday, March 25th at 12pm EDT

Full details to be announced soon, but you can register in advance here.

 

Club EvMed led by Joe Henrich (Harvard)

Thursday, April 1st at 12pm EDT

Full details to be announced soon, but you can register in advance here.

 

Club EvMed led by Zaneta Thayer (Dartmouth)

Monday, April 5th at 12pm EDT

Full details to be announced soon, but you can register in advance here.

 

Club EvMed led by Beth Archie and Chelsea Weibel (Univ of Notre Dame)

Wednesday, April 21st at 12pm EDT

Full details to be announced soon, but you can register in advance here.

 

Club EvMed led by Barb Natterson-Horowitz (UCLA), Martie Haselton (UCLA), Athena Aktipis (ASU), Joe Alcock (Univ of NM), and Dan Blumstein (UCLA)

Monday, May 10th at 12pm EDT

This discussion will focus on their recent PNAS paper, “The pandemic exposes human nature: 10 evolutionary insights.” Full details to be announced soon, but you can register in advance here.

 

Club EvMed led by Sarah Mathew (Arizona State Univ)

Monday, May 17th at 12pm EDT

Full details to be announced soon, but you can register in advance here.