Tibetan

Two Buddhist monks walk while reading booksTibetan is the language of a vast region at the heart of Asia and is used in China, Nepal, Bhutan, Pakistan, India, Russia, and Mongolia. In addition, Tibet is home to Tibetan Buddhism, which is itself the source of one of the worlds’ richest contemplative traditions. Learning Tibetan gives students the ability to explore this uniquely rich and diverse culture in today’s Asia, as well as learn about Buddhist philosophy, contemplation, and other forms of knowledge.

UVA will not offer Tibetan during the 2020-20 academic year.

Fall 2019 Courses 

TIBETAN 101 / 701 (Elementary Tibetan I) MTWTh 11:00 – 11:50

Introductory Tibetan language course for students who have little to no knowledge of Tibetan. Development of speaking, listening, reading, writing skills through Tibetan concepts, grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan. Topics include situations of everyday life (e.g. greetings, introductions, family, habits/hobbies, making appointments, food, visiting friends, weather, shopping, etc.) as well as aspects of Tibetan people and culture (e.g. songs, short stories, etc.). Course taught at University of Virginia; Duke students participate through Zoom virtual classroom.

TIBETAN 203 / 703 (Intermediate Tibetan I) MTWTh 12:00 – 12:50

Intermediate skill-building in the grammar and syntax of spoken and written Tibetan, along with development of skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the integrated use of spoken and literary forms. Students will also enhance their knowledge of Tibetan culture in order to improve their communication skills. Course taught at University of Virginia; Duke students participate through Zoom virtual classroom. Pre-Requisite: TIBETAN 102 Elementary Tibetan II or equivalent.

TIBETAN 301 (Advanced Tibetan I)  T Th F 1:00 – 1:50

A continuation of the Intermediate Tibetan language sequence, focusing on advanced grammar, syntax, and structures. Emphasis is laid on mastering comprehension and communication in colloquial Tibetan, writing skills in the various scripts of literary Tibetan, and integrating comprehension of colloquial and literary forms. Course taught at University of Virginia; Duke students participate through Zoom virtual classroom. Prerequisite: Tibetan 204 or equivalent.