comorbidity

Tobacco and other drug use among individuals with comorbid psychiatric illness. Individuals with psychiatric illness are more likely to become smokers and have greater difficulty quitting smoking. CfAST investigators have evaluated smoking in individuals with comorbid psychiatric problems including ADHD, depression and PTSD. In a longstanding line of research, we have identified ADHD symptoms as a risk factor for smoking, differential withdrawal symptom profiles among smokers with ADHD, and evaluated neurobehavioral correlates of ADHD-smoking comorbidity with fMRI. New approaches to understanding treating tobacco dependence among individuals with psychiatric conditions have been evaluated.

Relevant publications

McClernon FJ, Calhoun PS, Hertzberg JS, Dedert EA; VA Mid-Atlantic MentalIllness Research, Education, and Clinical Center Registry Workgroup, Beckham JC. Associations between smoking and psychiatric comorbidity in U.S. Iraq- and Afghanistan-era veterans. Psychol Addict Behav. 2013 Dec;27(4):1182-8. PUBMED FULL TEXT

Kollins SH, Schoenfelder E, English JS, McClernon FJ, Dew RE, Lane SD. Methylphenidate does not influence smoking-reinforced responding or attentional performance in adult smokers with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2013 Oct;21(5):375-84. PUBMED FULL TEXT

Current Projects

EFFECTS OF NICOTINE REDUCTION ON SMOKING BEHAVIOR IN ADHD SMOKERS R01HD083404 (PIs: Kollins, McClernon) NIH REPORTER

BEHAVIORAL AND GENETIC MECHANISMS OF SMOKING RISK IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ADHD R01DA033080 (PI: Kollins) NIH REPORTER