Publications

June 2016

Research by Matthew Dupre, Ph.D., associate professor of community and family medicine, was featured in the American Heart Association’s Scientific Statement on the Social Determinants of Risk and Outcomes for Cardiovascular Disease.

Michelle Lyn, MBA, MHA, assistant professor, Fred Johnson, MBA, assistant professor, and Cindy Haynes, MSA-PA, CHES, wrote a case study, “Chronic Non-Malignant Pain, Addiction and Accidental Overdose: Interventions Inside and Outside the Walls,” that was published by the American Hospital Association.
Perri Morgan, Ph.D., PA-C, professor of community and family medicine and director of research at the Duke Physician Assistant Program, and Christine Everett, Ph.D., MPH, PA-C, assistant professor of community and family medicine, are authors on “Physician assistant specialty choice: Distribution, salaries, and comparison to physicians,” published in the Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants.
Mina Silberberg, Ph.D., associate professor of community and family medicine, and Kathryn Pollack, Ph.D., professor of community and family medicine, are authors on “Use of the 5 As for Teen Alcohol Use,” published in Clinical Pediatrics.

April 2016

Patricia G. Moorman, Ph.D., professor of community and family medicine, is senior author on the article “The Association Between Body Mass Index and Presenting Symptoms in African American Women with Ovarian Cancer,” published in the Journal of Women’s Health; and co-author on the article “Association of Ovary-Sparing Hysterectomy With Ovarian Reserve,” published in Obstetrics and Gynecology.


February 2016

The study, “Scarcity of Primary Care Positions May Divert Physician Assistants Into Specialty Practice” was conducted by a team of researchers at Duke University and the University of California, San Francisco, led by Perri Morgan, Ph.D., PA-C, professor of community and family medicine and director of research at the Duke Physician Assistant Program, and Christine Everett, Ph.D., MPH, PA-C, assistant professor of community and family medicine, also at Duke. The research was funded by a grant from the Physician Assistant Education Association.

The research team also includes: Kristine A. Himmerick, Ph.D., MPAS, PA-C, post-doctoral fellow, Center for the Health Professions University of California, San Francisco; Brandi Leach, MS, research analyst, Duke Physician Assistant Program; and Patricia M. Dieter, MPA, PA-C, professor of community and family medicine and division chief of the Duke Physician Assistant Program.


December 2015

E. Harvey Estes, Jr., M.D., professor emeritus and former chair of Duke Community and Family Medicine, is the first author on “Individual components of the Romhilt-Estes left ventricular hypertrophy score differ in their prediction of cardiovascular events: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study,” published in the American Heart Journal.

Truls Østbye, M.D., Ph.D., MPH, MBA, FFPH, professor of community and family medicine, is an author on the article “The Relationship Between the Use of a Worksite Medical Home and ED Visits or Hospitalizations” in The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing.

Christine M. Everett, Ph.D., MPH, PA-C, assistant professor of community and family medicine, is an author on the article “Physician Assistant Job Satisfaction: A Narrative Review of Empirical Research” in the Journal of Physician Assistant Education.

Kim Cavanagh, DHSc, MPAS, PA-C, assistant professor of community and family medicine, is the first author on the article “Twenty Years of Growth and Innovation: A Reflection on PACKRAT’s Impact on Physician Assistant Education” in the Journal of Physician Assistant Education.

The Journal of Physician Assistant Education published an article, “Reinventing the Wheel: One Program’s Approach to Redesign of Didactic Courses,” by multiple Duke Physician Assistant Program authors. Authors are Nicholas M. Hudack (first author), MPA, MSEd, PA-C, assistant professor of community and family medicine; Victoria Scott, MHS, PA-C, associate consulting professor; and Karen J. Hills, MS, PA-C, associate professor of community and family medicine.


November 2015

Sharon Hull, M.D., MPH, chief of the Duke Division of Family Medicine, and J. Lloyd Michener, M.D., chair of Duke Community and Family Medicine, are authors on a paper “Partnering for Tranformation: A Menu of Many Points of Entry for Your Department,” published in the Annals of Family Medicine.

Viviana Martinez-Bianchi, M.D., FAAFP, is an author on the article “Preparing the Next Generation of Family Physicians to Improve Population Health: A CERA Study,” published in the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine’s Family Medicine journal.

Tara Ilsely-Murillo, MPH, published an article, “Rural and Metropolitan Experiences during Pregnancy: A View from Central North Carolina,” in Internal Medicine: Open Access.


October 2015

Patricia G. Moorman, Ph.D., professor of community and family medicine, is a co-author of “Benefits and Harms of Breast Cancer Screening-A Systematic Review,” published in Journal of the American Medical Association.


September 2015

Perri Morgan, Ph.D., PA-C, associate professor of community and family medicine, and Christine M. Everett, Ph.D., MPH, PA-C, assistant professor of community and family medicine published an article, “Facilitating Research in Physician Assistant Programs: Creating a Student-Level Longitudinal Database,” in The Journal of Physician Assistant Education.

Don Bradley, M.D., associate consulting professor of community and family medicine, is senior author for “An Integrated Framework For The Prevention And Treatment Of Obesity And Its Related Chronic Diseases,” published in Health Affairs.

Brian Blank, M.D., first-year family medicine resident, was a co-author on “Student and Resident Perspective: Family Medicine Is a Major Landmark on the Health Care Landscape,” published in Family Medicine.


July 2015

Duke Family Medicine Division Chief Sharon Hull, M.D., MPH, wrote a commentary, “Capsule Commentary on Goldman et al., Comparative Effectiveness of Multifaceted Outreach to Initiate Colorectal Cancer Screening in Community Health Centers: A Randomized Controlled Trial,” published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Kathy Andolsek, M.D., MPH, professor in community and family medicine, wrote an article, “Chasing Perfection and Catching Excellence in Graduate Medical Education,” published in the journal Academic Medicine.

Truls Østbye, M.D., Ph.D., professor of community and family medicine, published the article “Worksite Medical Home: Health Services Use and Claim Costs,” in the American Journal of Managed Care.

Matthew Dupre, Ph.D., associate professor of community and family medicine, was an author on the article “Association of Bystander and First-Responder Intervention With Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in North Carolina, 2010-2013,” published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.


June 2015

Aaron George, DO, third-year-resident, wrote an article, “A Potential Unexpected Consequence of Drug Shortages on Long-Term Prescribing Patterns,” published in the American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.


May 2015

Aaron George, DO, third-year resident, wrote an article, “Hold on one second: interrupting the intern year,” which was published in the online journal Medical Education.

Aaron George, DO, and Jon Bonnet, M.D., third-year residents, were co-authors on a guest commentary article published on Modern Healthcare website, titled “Let sleep be thy medicine.


April 2015

Gloria Trujillo, M.D., assistant professor of community and family medicine, co-authored an article published in the Journal of Heath Communication: International Perspectives. “Patient Beliefs and Behaviors About Genomic Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: Implications for Prevention” presents examinations of illness representations in a clinical sample who are at risk for type 2 diabetes and interested in genetic testing.

Duke Family Medicine Division published an article by Duke Community & Family Medicine authors Barbara Sheline, M.D., MPH; Viviana Martinez-Bianchi, M.D.; FAAFP; Melinda Blazar, MHS, PA-C; Patricia Dieter, MPA, PA-C; and Nancy Weigle, M.D. An additional author is Christopher Danford, M.D., of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wis. As explained in the article, Course on care of patients with chronic illness: Patient-centered medical home model,” the authors developed a one-semester curriculum to teach the principles and practice of patient-centered medical homes to medical and physician assistant students during their clinical clerkship year.

Duke Physician Assistant Program faculty Nick Hudak, MSEd, MPA, PA-C, assistant professor and clinical coordinator, and Kenyon Railey, M.D., medical instructor, were co-authors with three other Duke University faculty on the article “Enlisting New Teachers in Clinical Environments (ENTICE); novel ways to engage clinicians,” published Oct. 4 in Advances in Medical Education and Practice. The article provides the results of a 2013 survey of 180 primary care providers. The survey provides further insight into clinician educators’ perceptions regarding the education of a variety of different learners.


October 2014

The Journal of Obesity has published an article by Duke Family Medicine and Division of Community Health authors entitled “Rethinking Obesity Counseling: Having the French Fry Discussion.” Authors are Jonathan Bonnet, M.D. and Aaron George, DO, both Duke Family Medicine Center third-year residents; Mina Silberberg, Ph.D., assistant professor and vice chief for research and evaluation in the Division of Community Health; Pippa Evans, M.D., Duke Primary Care; and Diana Dolinsky, M.D., MPH, a general pediatrician in private practice. The article examines a study of family medicine primary care providers’ perceived barriers for preventing and treating pediatric obesity and their related practice behavior during well-child visits. The authors suggest primary care providers could consider integrating a “French Fry Discussion” at the 12-month well-child care visit, based on findings that food choices transition toward fast foods between a child’s age of 12 and 24 months.