Events

July 25: Family Medicine Population Health with Lloyd Michener, M.D.

12:15-1 p.m., Room 020A, Pickens Classroom. CME.

July 27: Family Medicine PHIT Project with Nikki Henry, M.D.

12:15-1 p.m., Room 020A, Pickens Classroom.

July 28: “Write Winning NIH Grant Proposals”

8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Medical Student Amphitheater, Duke South.

  • Seats held open for faculty through June 1
  • Registration for non-faculty begins June 2
  • Registration link below

Registration is now open to all faculty for Write Winning NIH Grant Proposals, the full-day grant writing seminar presented by John D. Robertson, Ph.D. and Associate Member of the widely acclaimed group Grant Writers’ Seminars and Workshops LLC. This session provides step-by-step instructions for how to craft a winning NIH grant proposal and is appropriate for all SoM faculty who are actively writing grants. Click here for a complete session description. Space is limited and seats are expected to fill up quickly, so sign up now if you wish to attend. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. Seats will be held open for faculty until June 1, at which point limited seating will become available for staff, fellows, postdocs, and other non-faculty. Click here to register

If you have questions or need any additional information, please contact Jessica Womack via email or phone: (919) 684-4139.

July 28: Family Medicine Team Leader Meeting

12:15-1 p.m., Room 020A, Pickens Classroom.

July 29: Family Medicine Work Culture Group Celebration

12:15-1 p.m., Room 020A, Pickens Classroom.

Aug. 5: OEM Seminar and Journal Club

3-4:30 p.m., 2200 West Main Street, 4th Floor Conference Room. “Enzymes, Detergents and Product Stewardship – Lessons Learned” presented by Richard R. Hammel, M.D., MPH.

Aug. 6: Duke School of Nursing Institute for Educational Excellence Presents the Clinical Instructor Intensive

Duke University School of Nursing. Registration is open for the 8th annual Clinical Instructor Intensive. The Intensive consists of two components – one for novice clinical instructors and one for both novice and experienced individuals.

The novice component helps build a foundation related to basic principles of teaching/learning, formative and summative evaluation practices, and student/teacher relationships.

The combined novice and experienced component provides an opportunity for participants to discuss challenges that arise while teaching in the clinical setting and how to best understand and manage them.

Click here to learn more and register today!

Aug. 9: Walk With a Doc

5:30 p.m., Marshall I. Pickens Building. Join Family Medicine providers on a one-mile walk through Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Rain or shine!

Aug. 25-26: Advancing the Science of Community Engaged Research– Innovative and Effective Methods of Engagement

Washington, D.C., Association of American Medical Colleges. The CEnR conference will convene researchers and community stakeholders in order to advance knowledge of the innovative methods and promising practices being used in the rapidly developing field of community engaged research. Learning labs will provide “how to” opportunities for small group learning on specific issues and practices and think tanks will advance discussion and problems solving for issues that can impede or accelerate community engaged research.

Aug. 31: 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Course

7-8:45 a.m., Learning Hall (Rm. 2050) in the Trent Semans Center for Health Education. Registration is now open for the 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) course. This 5-week course is held in the fall each year and the upcoming course will take place Wednesdays, August 31, September 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2016.

The course is open to recipients of NIH training grants and fulfills the NIH requirement for RCR education. The course is also open to post-docs. Course materials will be provided.

Sessions begin with a lecture in the Learning Hall and then divide into small groups for case discussions. Attendance at all sessions is required for credit. Sessions include:
Introduction to Responsible Conduct of Research and Mentoring
Human Subjects in Research
Research Misconduct
Publication and Authorship
Intellectual Property
Conflict of Interest

To register, please email the Trent Center.  Registration deadline is Friday, August 19, 2016.

Sept. 7: 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Course

7-8:45 a.m., Learning Hall (Rm. 2050) in the Trent Semans Center for Health Education. Registration is now open for the 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) course. This 5-week course is held in the fall each year and the upcoming course will take place Wednesdays, August 31, September 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2016.

The course is open to recipients of NIH training grants and fulfills the NIH requirement for RCR education. The course is also open to post-docs. Course materials will be provided.

Sessions begin with a lecture in the Learning Hall and then divide into small groups for case discussions. Attendance at all sessions is required for credit. Sessions include:
Introduction to Responsible Conduct of Research and Mentoring
Human Subjects in Research
Research Misconduct
Publication and Authorship
Intellectual Property
Conflict of Interest

To register, please email the Trent Center.  Registration deadline is Friday, August 19, 2016.

Sept. 13: Third Annual Health Professions Education Day – Save the Date!

9 a.m.-2 p.m., Trent Semans Center. “Working and Learning Together to Advance Health and Wellness for All.”

Sept. 13: Walk With a Doc

5:30 p.m., Marshall I. Pickens Building. Join Family Medicine providers on a one-mile walk through Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Rain or shine!

Sept. 14: 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Course

7-8:45 a.m., Learning Hall (Rm. 2050) in the Trent Semans Center for Health Education. Registration is now open for the 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) course. This 5-week course is held in the fall each year and the upcoming course will take place Wednesdays, August 31, September 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2016.

The course is open to recipients of NIH training grants and fulfills the NIH requirement for RCR education. The course is also open to post-docs. Course materials will be provided.

Sessions begin with a lecture in the Learning Hall and then divide into small groups for case discussions. Attendance at all sessions is required for credit. Sessions include:
Introduction to Responsible Conduct of Research and Mentoring
Human Subjects in Research
Research Misconduct
Publication and Authorship
Intellectual Property
Conflict of Interest

To register, please email the Trent Center.  Registration deadline is Friday, August 19, 2016.

Sept. 21: 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Course

7-8:45 a.m., Learning Hall (Rm. 2050) in the Trent Semans Center for Health Education. Registration is now open for the 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) course. This 5-week course is held in the fall each year and the upcoming course will take place Wednesdays, August 31, September 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2016.

The course is open to recipients of NIH training grants and fulfills the NIH requirement for RCR education. The course is also open to post-docs. Course materials will be provided.

Sessions begin with a lecture in the Learning Hall and then divide into small groups for case discussions. Attendance at all sessions is required for credit. Sessions include:
Introduction to Responsible Conduct of Research and Mentoring
Human Subjects in Research
Research Misconduct
Publication and Authorship
Intellectual Property
Conflict of Interest

To register, please email the Trent Center.  Registration deadline is Friday, August 19, 2016.

Sept. 24: North Carolina Diabetes and Insulin Management Summit

8 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Hilton DoubleTree, RDU Airport / Research Triangle Park. The first North Carolina Diabetes and Insulin Management Summit leverages the expertise across premier academic medical centers to provide healthcare providers applicable insights into the latest evidence-based care for diabetes patients. Topics include:

  • New and emerging insulins on the horizon
  • “Old” Insulins: How to initiate and titrate different insulin regimens
  • Panel Debate: Pros and cons of new analog and concentrated insulin
  • Adding stepwise therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Pitfalls and pearls: meters, pens, insulin delivery devices, and insulin
  • What a Certified Diabetes Educator can do for your patients

This jointly accredited Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) Education program is customized for primary care and family physicians, internists, endocrinologists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses.

To learn more about the summit details, agenda, logistics, and pricing, register now

or contact Ana Quinn, Associate Director Business Operations, DCRI Education

Sept. 26-27: Duke University School of Nursing Presents the Patient Safety Institute: “Promoting a Culture of Safety”

Duke University School of Nursing (DUSON). The conference will introduce patient safety concepts and methods to give participants the framework to facilitate, create and promote an improved culture of safety.

Featured Speakers

  • Judy Milne, MSN, RN, CPHQ, CPPS, patient safety officer for Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C. In her role at Duke, Milne is responsible for administering and facilitating the ongoing patient safety program and initiatives that foster safe patient care. She has participated in the development of patient safety policies, methods and responses for nearly 20 years as the regulatory and accreditation systems in the United Sates have advanced the focus on patient safety.
  • René Schwendimann, Ph.D., RN, chief patient safety officer for University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. In his role at the 750-bed University Hospital, Schwendimann is responsible for leading patient safety programs such as adverse event detection and learning from medical errors using root cause analyses or learning from defects. He has more than 30 years of professional experience in the clinical, administrative and teaching arena. His research includes patient falls prevention, nurse workforce issues and patient safety culture.
  • Bryan J. Sexton, Ph.D., director of Duke Patient Safety Center for Duke University Health System in Durham, N.C. With specializations in organizational assessment, teamwork, survey development and quantitative methods, Sexton spends his time teaching, mentoring, conducting research and finding practical ways of getting busy caregivers to do the right thing by making it the easy thing to do. He has captured the wisdom of frontline caregivers through rigorous assessments of safety culture, teamwork and workforce resilience and his research instruments have been used around the world in more than 3,000 hospitals in 30 countries.

In addition to the in-person lectures, participants will participate in two pre- and post- course webinars. There will also be time allocated for Q&A and consultation regarding issues pertinent to the participants’ local experiences or needs.

The conference is open to patient-care practitioners, registered nurses, nurse practitioners, patient safety, quality and risk professionals, hospital executives and board members, and patient advocates. The cost of the conference is $649.

Duke University Health System Department of Clinical Education and Professional Development designates this jointly accredited activity for a maximum of 15.0 AMAPRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ and designates this activity for up to 15.0 credit hours for nurses. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Nurses should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in this activity.

Learn more about the conference and register.

Sept. 27: CTSA Virtual Town Hall on Stakeholder Engagement

noon, login details. Learn more about how faculty and staff at Duke are helping to create community-ready researchers and research-ready communities. Hosted by Dr. Ebony Boulware, a PI for the Duke Clinical and Translational Science Award (Duke CTSA), this conversation will include presentations by Bray Patrick-Lake, director of Stakeholder Engagement for the Duke CTSA, and also members of the recently created Community Collaboration and Connection Core (c4), part of Duke’s Center for Community and Population Health Improvement.

Sept. 28: 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Course

7-8:45 a.m., Learning Hall (Rm. 2050) in the Trent Semans Center for Health Education. Registration is now open for the 2016 Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) course. This 5-week course is held in the fall each year and the upcoming course will take place Wednesdays, August 31, September 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2016.

The course is open to recipients of NIH training grants and fulfills the NIH requirement for RCR education. The course is also open to post-docs. Course materials will be provided.

Sessions begin with a lecture in the Learning Hall and then divide into small groups for case discussions. Attendance at all sessions is required for credit. Sessions include:
Introduction to Responsible Conduct of Research and Mentoring
Human Subjects in Research
Research Misconduct
Publication and Authorship
Intellectual Property
Conflict of Interest

To register, please email the Trent Center.  Registration deadline is Friday, August 19, 2016.

Sept. 29: New Faculty Welcome Reception

5:30 p.m.-7 p.m., Doris Duke Center at Duke Gardens. Heavy hors d’oeuvres, beer and wine will be provided. The purpose of this reception is to welcome all new faculty from the schools of Medicine and Nursing to the Duke community. There are no formal presentations. The event is structured as a networking reception for new faculty to meet colleagues and interact with leadership. It is a relaxed and informal evening, and typically a lot of fun. Our goal is to foster a sense of community and to provide information that can be used to navigate Duke and build a successful career here. This event is appropriate for faculty hired in the past 3 years. Please click here to register if you plan to attend.

Oct. 4: Duke Institute for Health Innovation’s 2nd Innovation Jam

The proposed ideas can be a concept or a simple prototype, but must need to have a clear business and value proposition. The event will be formatted after the television show Shark Tank.

Several senior leaders have pledged to invest actual dollars in order to earn a coveted place at the Investors Table. The Innovation Jam will also be an incredible opportunity to be noticed by some of the most important people at Duke and have their undivided attention. Six to eight innovative and well-conceptualized ideas will be selected to pitch to our esteemed Investors. Submissions are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, August 12th and open to staff, faculty, residents, and students from Duke Health, Duke University, and Duke University Health System.

Teams can consist of individuals from different divisions, departments, and schools. The Innovation Jam is an exciting chance to see what the best and brightest can pitch to our Investors and hear what our Investors think! Event attendance is open to both Duke and external audiences. More information.

Oct. 6: New Faculty Orientation

8 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Trent Semans Center, Great Hall. Topics will include an institutional overview, unconscious bias, advice for appointments, promotion, and tenure, and interactive discussions of academic integrity. Everyone is welcome to attend, however, material will be geared towards School of Medicine faculty hired within the last 3 years. Please click here to register.

Oct. 11: Walk With a Doc

5:30 p.m., Marshall I. Pickens Building. Join Family Medicine providers on a one-mile walk through Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Rain or shine!

Nov. 8: Walk With a Doc

5:30 p.m., Marshall I. Pickens Building. Join Family Medicine providers on a one-mile walk through Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Rain or shine!

Dec. 13: Walk With a Doc

5:30 p.m., Marshall I. Pickens Building. Join Family Medicine providers on a one-mile walk through Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Rain or shine!