Duke in Africa

2009 meeting of the Madagascar Fauna Group

Duke Lemur Center – Madagascar

The Duke Lemur Center was established in 1966 and today is the world’s largest sanctuary for rare and endangered prosimian primates.   Nestled on 85 acres in Duke Forest, the Lemur Center houses about 250 animals, including 233 lemurs encompassing 15 species, along with lorises from India and Southeast Asia and bushbabies from Africa.

The Mission of the Duke Lemur Center is to promote research and understanding of prosimians and their natural habitat as a means of advancing the frontiers of knowledge, to contribute to the educational development of future leaders in international scholarship and conservation and to enhance the human condition by stimulating intellectual growth and sustaining global biodiversity.

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DukeEngage

DukeEngage provides funding for Duke undergraduates who wish to pursue an immersive (minimum of eight weeks) service experience that meets a community need locally, domestically or internationally. More than 1,000 Duke students have participated in Duke Engage since the program launched in 2007 with funding from The Duke Endowment and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. DukeEngage Programs in Africa include:

  • DukeEngage in Kenya: Foundation for Sustainable Development (FSD)
  • DukeEngage in Kenya: Women in Secondary Education and Research (WISER)
  • DukeEngage in Cape Town, South Africa: Documenting & Engagement Movements of Social Change
  • DukeEngage in South Africa: Durban
  • DukeEngage in Tanzania: Engineering World Health
  • DukeEngage in Togo: Working with a Local Community Organization to Step Out Migration
  • DukeEngage in Uganda: Progressive Health Partnership

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Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI)

Duke Global Health PLUS

Duke Global Health PLUS (Placement of Life‐changing Useable Surplus) was created in 2007 by Duke University Health System and DGHI to provide useable surplus equipment to health facilities around the world. The first shipment of nine tons of equipment valued at $1.3 million was made to Mulago Hospital in Kampala, the nation’s largest hospital. Duke neurosurgeon Michael Haglund and his team used the equipment to modernize the hospital’s operating rooms, intensive care units, and recovery rooms. In addition, they provided neurosurgical, anesthesiology, nursing and clinical engineering training camps to local health providers. Haglund’s effort has been instrumental in Mulago Hospital’s success in doubling the number of surgical cases, and nearly tripling the number of neurosurgery cases, the hospital handles each year. It has also led to an eightfold increase in operating room efficiency. Haglund’s program is proof that combining capacity building, training and partnership between health systems from the United States and East Africa can be a successful model to address disparities in surgical care.

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Partnership with KCMC: Moshi, Tanzania

Moshi, Tanzania, is home to Duke’s most established partnership for research, education and service‐learning.  Spanning more than 10 years and with almost $3 million per year in research funding, Moshi is the largest of any site in the DGHI portfolio. In that time, Duke has built substantial clinical research collaborations with Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), and has placed medical students, residents and fellows there for training opportunities. In addition, Duke is helping to sustain and build capacity by enabling 34 Tanzanian trainees to complete research training in the U.S. and around the world. Duke’s research projects so far have largely focused on HIV/AIDS, though in the past year they have expanded to include women’s reproductive health and mental health.

With the help of DGHI, KCMC received a five year $10 million grant beginning in 2010 from PEPFAR, Fogarty International Center and Health Resources and Services Administration, to strengthen medical education in Tanzania. The KCMC‐Duke Medical Education Partnership Initiative grant expands the decade‐plus partnership between Duke and KCMC by providing a new generation of Tanzanian physicians with the knowledge, commitment and tools to become their country’s leaders in academics, research and policy.

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Duke Divinity School: Center for Reconciliation

The Center for Reconciliation was founded in 2005 to inspire, form, and support leaders, communities, and congregations to live as ambassadors of reconciliation, justice, and peacemaking in a divided world. After five years, the Center has become a leading voice in shaping a distinctly Christian vision of reconciliation. Every spring, the Center takes a group of divinity students on a 5‐day immersion experience into two communities, providing them with an opportunity for spiritual growth, theological and classroom learning, and wisdom from community leaders with life‐long experience in reconciliation. Center co‐director Emmanuel Katongole is a Catholic priest from Uganda and Associate Professor of Theology & World Christianity at Duke Divinity School.

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Duke Divinity Faculty Partnerships with The Methodist Church of Southern Africa, John Wesley College in South Africa, and the Catholic Church in Uganda

Duke Divinity School maintains partnerships with several international church and scholastic institutions. Through these arrangements, faculty and students from the divinity school and the partner institutions share expertise, experiences and prayer. The partnership programs afford the opportunity for Duke Divinity School faculty and staff to visit, teach, serve and learn from the partner institutions, and for students, faculty and staff from the partner schools to visit Duke University.

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Duke Divinity School: International Field Education

The Divinity School’s summer internships in International Field Education place theological education and pastoral training in the context of an increasingly interconnected global community. These international placements have been offered since 2001, when three divinity school students spent the summer serving in South Africa. Since then, interest and applications to the program have risen dramatically. The program now includes internships in Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, South Africa, Kenya, Malawi and Uganda.

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Global Education for Undergraduates (GEO-U)

Duke in Ghana

The Departments of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies, in conjunction with the Duke University Global Education Office for Undergraduates, offer a  six week, two‐course program on culture and life in Ghana. The program is based at the University of Ghana at Legon, just outside the capital city of Accra.

Courses focus on Ghanaian politics, history, social life, dance, music and art. Students also travel as a group through various parts of the country, crossing from rainforest to dry savannah, visiting cities, coastal fishing towns, and rural farming villages. Students tour and learn about the former slave forts at Cape Coast and Elmina. They also visit museums and craft villages in and around Kumasi, capital of the former Ashanti Empire.

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Global Education for Undergraduates and Organization for Tropical Studies: Global Health; Issues in South Africa

Launched in the summer of 2011, this course integrates classroom and field instruction to introduce students to the fundamental principles of South African medicine and public health systems. Students study such topics as infectious diseases, epidemiology, virology and zoonosis, sexual health and reproductive issues, environmental health, global health issues, and traditional and alternative medicine, as well as current techniques and concerns in South African medicine and public health.

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The Fuqua School of Business

Fuqua has long been engaged with Sub-Saharan Africa through our various partners, alumni network, and diverse curriculum including exchange programs, Global Academic Travel Experience (GATE) elective courses, and Global Consulting Practicums.

These programs have provided students with the opportunity to internationalize their MBA experience, and in recent years, we have been busy building an even stronger foundation in Sub-Saharan Africa so that we can genuinely become embedded and connected in the region.

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Duke Corporate Education – South Africa

Duke Corporate Education opened its Johannesburg office in 2008 to provide custom executive education to South African clients. Clients have included Standard Bank, Anglo Platinum and

Rand Merchant Bank. The Johannesburg office also supports local deliveries of global programs for American and European clients.

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The Africa Initiative│John Hope Franklin Center│ (919) 681-2293  Email: deirdre.white@duke.edu

Duke University