95 – Old Hildebrand

KHM 95 - Old Hildebrand

Once upon a time lived a peasant and his wife, and the parson of the village had a fancy for the wife, and had wished for a long while to spend a whole day happily with her, and the peasant woman, too, was quite willing. One day, therefore, he said to the woman, “Listen, my dear friend, I have now thought of a way by which we can for once spend a whole day happily together. I’ll tell you what: on Wednesday, you must take to your bed, and tell your husband you are ill, and if you only complain and act being ill properly, and go on doing it until Sunday when I have to preach, I will then say in my sermon that whosoever has at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or whosoever else it may be, and makes a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where you can get a peck of laurel-leaves for a kreuzer, the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, or sick mother, the sick sister, or whosoever else it may be, will be restored to health immediately.”
“I will manage it,” said the woman directly. Now therefore, on the Wednesday, the peasant woman took to her bed, and complained and lamented as agreed on, and her husband did every- thing for her that he could think of, but nothing did her any good, and when Sunday came the woman said, “l feel as ill as if I were going to die at once, but there is one thing I should like to do before my end – I should like to hear the parson’s sermon that he is going to preach today.” On that the peasant said, “Ah, my child, do not do it – you might make yourself worse if you were to get up. Look, I will go to the sermon, and will attend to it very carefully, and will tell you everything the parson says.”
“Well,” said the woman, “go, then, and pay great attention, and repeat to me all that you hear.” So the peasant went to the sermon, and the parson began to preach and said, if any one had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or anyone else, and would make a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laiuel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it might be, would be restored to health instantly; and whosoever wished to undertake the journey was to go to him after the service was over, and he would give him the sack for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer.
No one was more rejoiced than the peasant, and after the service was over, he went at once to the parson, who gave him the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer. After that he went home, and even at the house door he cried, “Hurrah! dear wife, it is now al- most the same thing as if you were well! The parson has preached today that whosoever had at home a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or who- ever it might be, and would make a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer, the sick child, sick husband, sick wife, sick father, sick mother, sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately; and now I have already got the bag and the kreuzer from the parson, and will at once begin my journey so that you may get well the faster,” and thereupon he went away. He was, however, hardly gone before the women got up, and the parson was there directly.
But now we will leave these two for a while, and follow the peas- ant, who walked on quickly without stopping, in order to get the sooner to the Göckerli hill; and on his way he met his gossip. His gossip was an egg-merchant, and was just coming from the market, where he had sold his eggs. “May you be blessed,” said the gossip, “where are you off to so fast?”
“To all eternity, my friend,” said the peasant, “my wife is ill, and I have been today to hear the parson’s sermon, and he preached that if anyone had in his house a sick child, a sick husband, a sick wife, a sick father, a sick mother, a sick sister, brother or anyone else, and made a pilgrimage to the Göckerli hill in Italy, where a peck of laurel-leaves costs a kreuzer; the sick child, the sick husband, the sick wife, the sick father, the sick mother, the sick sister, brother, or whosoever else it was, would be cured immediately; and so I have got the bag for the laurel-leaves and the kreuzer from the parson, and now I am beginning my pilgrimage.” “But listen, gossip,” said the egg-merchant to the peasant, “are you, then, stupid enough to believe such a thing as that? Don’t you know what it means? The parson wants to spend a whole day alone with your wife in peace, so he has given you this job to do to get you out of the way.”
“My word!” said the peasant. “How I’d like to know if that’s true!”
“Come, then,” said the gossip, “I’ll tell you what to do. Get into my egg-basket and I will carry you home, and then you will see for yourself.” So that was settled, and the gossip put the peasant into his egg-basket, and carried him home.
When they got to the house, hurrah! but all was going merrily there I The woman had already had nearly everything killed that was in the farmyard, and had made pancakes; and the parson was there, and had brought his fiddle with him. The gossip knocked at the door, and the woman asked who was there. “It is I, gossip,” said the egg-merchant, “give me shelter this night; I have not sold my eggs at the market, so now I have to carry them home again, and they are so heavy that I shall never be able to do it, for it is dark already.”
‘Indeed, my friend,” said the woman, “you come at a very inconvenient time for me, but as you are here it can’t be helped; come in, and take a seat there on the bench by the stove.” Then she placed the gossip and the basket which he carried on his back on the bench by the stove. The parson, however, and the woman were as merry as possible. At length the parson said, “Listen, my dear friend, you can sing beautifully; sing something to me.” “Oh,” said the woman, “1 cannot sing now, in my young days indeed I could sing well enough, but that’s all over now.” “Come,” said the parson once more, “do sing some little song.”
Then the woman sang,

“I’ve sent my husband atoay from me
To the Göckerli hill in Italy.”

Thereupon the parson sang,

“I wish ’twas a year before he came back,
I’d never ask him for the laurel-leaf sack.
Hallelujah.”

Then the gossip, who was in the background, began to sing (but I ought to tell you the peasant was called Hildebrand), so the gossip sang,

“What art thou doing, my Hildebrand dear.
There on the bench by the stove so near?
Hallelujah.”

Then the peasant sang from his basket,

“All singing I ever shall hate from this day, And here in this basket no longer I’ll stay.
Hallelujah.”

And he got out of the basket and drove the parson out of the house.