Filed Under (Nutrition) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 04-05-2015 and tagged , , , , ,

Contributed by Kate Sayre, MPH, RDN, LDN

You’ve worked hard and deserve to celebrate milestones-whether it is the Beach Week, graduation, or your birthday.  I’m a big fan of celebrating these events and am a believer in calories not counting on your birthday (birthDAY, not birthMONTH).  One day of celebratory eating does not mean that you’ve “fallen off the wagon” but can rather be part of an overall balanced and healthy diet.  That being said, there are so many good things in life that it’s important to know how to enjoy events while keeping your health goals in mind.

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Filed Under (Nutrition) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 21-04-2015 and tagged , , , , ,

bacteria pic

Contributed by Franca B. Alphin, MPH, RDN, CSSD, CEDRD, LDN

Many of us have had it.  That feeling in our stomachs that doesn’t bode well, the cramps and the wave of nausea that we know is coming.   That feeling is usually caused by some unwanted bacteria, a virus or even toxins from something being off in the food that we ate. Food safety is a national concern addressing a range of issues from ethical treatment of animals to antibiotic resistant bacteria, GMOS etc.,  but most commonly it refers to reducing risk of food borne illness.  48 million Americans report foodborne illness each year which results in 128,000 hospitalizations per year and 3,000 deaths per year.

How do we fight BAC (bacteria)?  There are four basic things you can do:

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Filed Under (Nutrition, Sustainability) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 13-04-2015 and tagged , , , , ,

Contributed by Kate Sayre, MPH, RDN, LDN

Earth Day is coming up and at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke we’re celebrating it on Friday, April 17th and Saturday, April 18th.  While we’d love you to take part in the events those days and throughout the month, it’s important to think about sustainability on a daily basis.  We only have one earth after all!

Here are 5 tips to incorporate impactful lifestyle changes into your life.

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Filed Under (Nutrition) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 06-04-2015 and tagged , , , , ,

Contributed by Toni Ann Apadula, RDN, LDN, CEDRD

Well that warm golden blob in the sky has finally decided to appear and it is actually starting to feel like spring. This of course means that warm weather clothing is making an appearance along with more skin.

Skin is an organ just like you heart or liver (in fact it is the largest organ of your body), but it’s easy to take for granted.  You might think that slathering on expensive lotions is the best way to keep skin healthy and looking its best but the real work begins on the inside.

Here’s a quick guide to foods that help you have great looking healthy skin:

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Filed Under (Nutrition) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 30-03-2015 and tagged , , , , , , ,

 By Rebecca Cray, Nutrition Intern, Trinity ’15

Walking into Joe Van Gogh a few mornings ago, I can’t say I was very surprised to see macadamia nut milk being advertised as the newest addition to the menu.  In February, coffee-giant Starbucks started offering coconut milk, and just a quick trip to the Lobby Shop presents you with rice, almond, and soy alternatives to your classic dairy staple.  Alternative milks are trendier than ever, but before you get swept up in this cow-less chaos (or strain your brain pondering how to milk an almond), it’s important to evaluate the nutritional differences that exist amongst the plethora of dairy-free options.

Cow’s Milk:

After coming from the cow, traditional milk is pasteurized (heated, then quickly cooled) to kill bacteria.  Then, depending on the type – non-fat, 1%, 2% or whole – the liquid is “skimmed” to remove a certain percentage of milkfat.

A cup of dairy milk contains between 90 and 150 calories (depending on the milkfat level), and is a good source of protein with 8 grams per cup.  Dairy milk ranges between 0 to 8 grams of fat and contains 12 grams of naturally occurring sugar per cup. A cup of cow’s milk contains 30% of the recommended daily value of calcium and is fortified with vitamin D.

Why vitamin D you ask?

Vitamin D is necessary for the body’s absorption of calcium.  It’s also important to note that D is a fat-soluble vitamin, meaning your body needs to consume some fat – either in or alongside the milk – for effective absorption.

Nut Milks (Almond, Cashew, Macadamia):

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Filed Under (Nutrition) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 16-03-2015 and tagged , , , , ,

Contributed by Duke Student Health Dietitians

Have you noticed that now-a-days there appears to be a mobile app for everything: one to monitor our sleep, our exercise, our diet, our breathing, our heart rate and so on and so on.  But the question begs, just because the app exists, is it really always in our best interest to use it? As dietitians we hear a lot about calorie and physical activity tracking apps, so we’d like to review a few of the more popular ones. Important point to remember is that both diet and exercise are behaviors, which are not typically tracked using numbers: mindfulness, hunger/satiety, feelings; whereas apps tend to be all about “the numbers”; calories, fat, protein, carbs, sugar, time spend exercising, intensity of exertion, number of days, minutes, hours etc.  Just because the numbers “hit” your target, doesn’t mean you’re engaging in healthy behaviors. It’s important to try to create healthy behaviors and habits that are long lasting, not just for immediate gratification.

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Filed Under (Nutrition) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 23-02-2015 and tagged , , , , ,

Toni Ann Apadula, RDN, LDN, CEDRD, Duke Student Health Nutrition

I remember several years ago as a young adolescent my daughter and her friend dressing up in homemade Halloween costumes as “We’ve Been Dumped Girls”. The costumes consisted of PJs, bathrobes, fuzzy slippers, hair in sloppy ponytails, smeared mascara and of course empty containers of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream.  Creative-Yes! Accurate? Let’s see…

New research shows that people with temporary mood lows generally bounce back pretty well on their own regardless of what they may eat. Those with more prolonged mood lows may turn to food on a more regular basis for comfort but the resulting lift in spirits is generally short lived and may result in cyclical emotional eating patterns. For these folks consulting a qualified therapist for an evaluation is the best advice.

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Filed Under (Nutrition) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 09-02-2015 and tagged , , ,

Beginning next Monday, February 16th, Nutrition Services is partnering with many offices across campus to host a positive body image week.  In the past, we’ve celebrated National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, but found that students are already aware of eating disorders.  Renaming the week and focusing on learning to embrace our bodies can help students to move away from some of the behaviors that might increase risk of developing disordered eating and exercise patterns.

Here’s a breakdown of the events we have going on next week, all of which are free and do not require tickets.

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Filed Under (Nutrition) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 26-01-2015 and tagged , , , , ,

Contributed by Rebecca Cray, Student Nutrition Intern, Trinity ‘15

As a Duke student, I am no stranger to the late-night cram session the night before an exam, or the essay-writing marathon that stretches into the early morning hours.  For many of us in college, day and night have become flexible terms that more often than not misalign with being awake and being asleep.  When burning the midnight oil, we often crave a snack to keep us going through the night.  However, a recent study by the Salk Institute for Biological Studies (reviewed here in the NY Times) suggests that these late-night nibbles may be messing with our bodies’ internal clocks.

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Filed Under (Nutrition) by Kate Pilewski, M.P.H. on 12-01-2015 and tagged , , , , , , ,

Contributed by Franca B. Alphin, MPH, RDN, LDN, CSSD, CEDRD

It’s ironic that at a time when new legislation will demand that restaurants (having more than 20 locations), and vending machines (anyone owning more than 20) will have to disclose calorie and nutrition information, we are also learning that counting calories might be counterproductive to addressing the obesity epidemic in this country.

It’s not rocket science to figure out that calorie counting might not be working – it’s been done for years and look where it got us. Believe me, I realize that our obesity epidemic is not just about calorie counting: obesity is actually very complex, we always just want to over simplify it by bringing it back to calories in and calories out.  We now know that the source of calories consumed have different effects metabolically in our bodies.

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